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Helping Those Who Won’t Help Themselves

first_imgYou can’t want something for someone who doesn’t want it for themselves. It doesn’t matter that you can see what they could become, that you see talent being wasted, or that a potential financial gain is being lost. Until they want it for themselves, nothing you do will make a difference.Some have too little ambition, even though you see the talent. Others have too small a vision for themselves, even though you see what they cannot yet see. Some are lazy, some are fearful, some prefer the role of victim, even though you know they have power they don’t yet recognize.You can make introductions. You can offer advice and help develop plans. You can spend time coaching and mentoring the individual in whom you see something more, something bigger. But your actions won’t result in anything other than your frustration unless the person you are trying to help decides to exercise their own initiative and take action.The challenge here isn’t to offer your help providing opportunities, coaching, mentoring, or even doing the work that might help the person who won’t take action on their own. The challenge is in helping them change their mind about what they should want for themselves, about what they are truly capable of, about who they could become.The only real help you can offer the person in whom you see greater things is to help them change their beliefs, their mindset, their attitude, and their vision. And these are the most difficult areas in which to make a difference. Unless and until they decide to believe something different, and unless they take action on their own, all of your efforts are for naught.last_img read more

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Why You Didn’t Reach Your Goals Last Year and How to Reach Them Now

first_imgRight around this time each year, people stop to write their goals and to resolve to make changes in their lives. Most of the time the goals aren’t achieved or the resolutions kept. The reason we fail is because, outside of some greater context, goals and resolutions are impotent.Not Enough Focus at 50,000 FeetWe spend too much time in the here and now, and not enough time working on what will give our lives meaning, our vision of ourselves, our values, our mission, and our contribution. If you want to reach your goals and keep your resolutions, you have to spend time here, at 50,000 ft.How is your goal or resolution tied to the person you are striving to become?How does your goal align with your values? Which values?What mission is your goal or resolution going to help you to achieve?In what way does your goal or resolution help you to make the contribution you are here to make?There isn’t any reason to work on all the things on your To Do list unless those things are concretely tied to what gives your life meaning. But once you can answer these questions, you need to get to the concrete.Not Enough Focus at 10,000 ft.A goal or a resolution needs a plan. Without a concrete, written action plan and accountability, your goals or resolutions are simply good intentions. Spending time at 50,000 feet can help compel you with a burning reason “why.” Spending time at 10,000 feet can provide you with the “what,” the “how,” and the “when.”In order to reach your goal, what do you have to do right now?What actions do you have to take, and when do you have to take themWhat resources do you have available to help you achieve your goal and keep your resolution?How are you going to hold yourself accountable?Without a big, compelling reason “why,” your goals and resolutions are impotent. Without an action plan to commit to and personal accountability, your goals and resolutions are nothing more than good intentions.You breathe life into your goals and resolutions by doing the work to tie them to your mission and what gives meaning to your life.last_img read more

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The Two Types of Hunger

first_imgThere are two very different types of hunger. The first type is the hunger you feel when you want or need something now, like food, water, shelter, a new smart phone, an 85-inch television, or a Bugatti. This hunger is impetuous and feels urgent, even though much of the hunger is anything but urgent (no one ever died from a lack of Bugatti). This part of your hunger is insatiable and, except for food and water and shelter, feeding this hunger only increases your appetite.The second type of hunger is the hunger for what you really want. It isn’t a hunger for the things you want now, but it is instead a hunger for the things you want later, the person you will become. This hunger is “be more, do more, have more, and contribute more,” not just “have more.” It’s a different type of hunger altogether.Feeding the first type of hunger, let’s call it “Present You Hunger,” often means starving what we might call “Future You Hunger.”Feeding Present YouThe time and energy and money you invest in acquiring the things you want now deprive you of using those same resources in the future, time especially, it being your single, finite, non-renewable resource.What’s challenging here is the way we perceive time. We feel a sense of urgency around the things we want now without feeling a similar urgency about what we want in the future.Feeding Future You FirstThere is an age-old desire to make sure you feed Future You. It requires self-discipline, willpower, or what I call “Me Management,” but it is an easier shift than most people believe. The simple hack that ensures you become more, do more, have more, and contribute more is to feed future you first (very much like eating a healthy meal to crowd out the desire for something less healthy).What do you need to do now to become who you want to be in the future?What do you need to do now to have what you want in the future?What do you need to do now to contribute more later?Not DeprivationThere is a balance here. Present You Hunger doesn’t need to be eliminated completely. It just needs to be kept in check. It’s important that you be future-oriented while also living in the present. Dealing with “Future You Hunger” first allows you to live in the present without risking Future You. Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

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Police detain 2 Bihar entrepreneurs

first_imgTwo entrepreneurs were detained by police for six hours for posing questions to Chief Minister Nitish Kumar at a start-up summit held in Patna on Tuesday. The two entrepreneurs — Nemi Kumar Saraf (43), and Suresh Kumar Sharma (46), — were among hundreds of entrepreneurs who were invited to the “4th Bihar Entrepreneurship Summit-Start-up”, organised by the Bihar Entrepreneurs Association.Mr. Kumar was the chief guest with State Industries Minister Jai Kumar Singh and several top officials also present and released the Bihar Start-Up policy 2017 document. But when the two entrepreneurs, rose to pitch their ideas while raising issues of transparency in government approval of start-up projects and on the harassment from banks for loans, they invited the ire of the police officials. Though the Chief Minister in his speech acknowledged their suggestions and instructed officials to pay heed to their complaints, the police officials detained the duo after Mr Kumar left the venue. Speaking of the traumatic ordeal that followed, Mr. Saraf told The Hindu said, “I, along with Suresh Kumar, was taken to the local Gandhi Maidan police station where police officials questioned us like criminals and forced us to sit there for six hours. We’re not allowed to eat, drink water or even go to toilet…our mobile phones were seized and we’re not allowed to talk even to our family members.” Mr Saraf, a well-known social figure from Madhubani and an RTI activist, further added that when the police were quizzing him in Patna, the local police came to his house in Madhubani and interrogated his ageing parents and wife. “It was a real torture for them too…nightmare for us all,” he said.‘Falsely implicated’Mr. Saraf said, “I also proposed that the government should disclose the names of approved projects and give reasons for rejecting others on its official website… to make the process transparent.” Mr Sharma from Chhaurahi village of Begusarai too spoke of his ordeal. “I was falsely implicated in a loan case by someone who had purchased a machine from me in 2013…when I failed to get any response from any quarter, I raised the issue before the Chief Minister while asking how an entrepreneur could do business in the State…but, the policemen took me under detention,” Mr Sharma told The Hindu. The two men who were taken into detention at around 1 p.m. were released at 8:10 p.m. and were forced to state in writing that they had been treated well and were being released in good condition by the police.“We’d taken them under detention to get the details…name of one of them, Suresh Kumar Sharma, has come up in a case…But we released them after getting the details,” was all Patna Superintendent of Police Manu Maharaj told journalists on Thursday.Responding to the incident, State Industries Minister Jai Kumar Singh said, “Whatever had happened with the two should not have happened.” Opposition BJP leaders have demanded a response from the Chief Minister. “If somebody asks question to the Chief Minister, should he face such action,” asked senior State BJP leader Nand Kishore Yadav.last_img read more

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Rajasthan villagers perform rituals in government hospital

first_imgIn a bizarre case, villagers in Rajasthan’s Bhilwara district conducted rituals and beat drums for three hours on the premises of a government hospital in the belief it would drive out the soul of their dead relative. The incident happened at MG Hospital on Saturday where a relative of some of the villagers had died sometime back. Doctors said villagers performed the ritual in their belief that they could take the soul back with them. “Villagers believe that the soul of their dead relative wanders on the hospital premises and performed rituals so that it rests in peace and family members live in peace,” said principal medical officer K.C. Panwar. “We will issue an advisory for family members to not perform such activities on hospital premises,” Dr. Panwar said.Rooster sacrificed ADM (City) Anandilal Vaishnav and SP Pradeep Mohan Sharma had inquired about the incident from hospital authorities, hospital police post sources said. This is the second such case which has come to light in the State. Last week a rooster was sacrificed, lemons quashed and rituals performed by an occult practitioner at a government hospital in Kota in a futile bid to bring a dead man back. Following the incident, which happened in the presence of medical staff, the hospital had appointed a committee of three members to probe the matter.last_img read more

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Unaware of Lalu rally: Mulayam

first_imgSamajwadi Party patron Mulayam Singh Yadav on Sunday declined to confirm his participation in the proposed August 27 rally to be organised by RJD supremo Lalu Prasad in Patna. Several top Opposition leaders have been invited.“I don’t know anything about this,” Mr. Mulayam told reporters. The SP patron also endorsed his brother Shivpal Yadav forming a new party, while answering a question on Mr. Shivpal’s Samajwadi Secular Morcha.last_img

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Shun Chinese goods, says RSS wing

first_imgThe late evening calm on rain-washed Trilokinath Marg, barely 100 m away from the Uttar Pradesh Vidhan Sabha, is shattered by a Bhojpuri jingle played full blast from loudspeakers mounted on a gold-painted bus.“Gaonwa khushaal hoi apne karigari se, Chinwa dhahal jayi samaan bahishkaari se, Bhagawa apni desh se Cheen ke samanwa. (The villages will prosper with help of local craft. China will be rocked by the boycott of its products. Chase out Chinese products from our country),” urges the jingle in the earthy dialect.Termed the Swadeshi Sankalp Rath Yatra, the bus is part of the RSS’s campaign against Chinese products, led by its economic wing the Swadeshi Jagran Manch (SJM). It has just arrived in Lucknow from Rae Bareli after passing through the southern parts of Purvanchal and Awadh. The SJM yatra, which began from the Bharat Mata Mandir in Varanasi on June 28, will end in Ballia on September 25 after passing through 28 districts of eastern U.P. and Awadh regions. “We are holding small meetings in other parts of the State as well. After U.P., it will move to other states,” said Lalkeshwar Tripathi, an SJM activist in-charge of its programme in Lucknow.The campaign involves street plays, signature campaigns, public meetings and burning of effigies personifying China. Pamphlets are also being distributed. One pamphlet claims that the Chinese feel threatened that a “developing, young India” might challenge its economic might.last_img read more

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HC stays MoEF order to transfer Goa’s NGT jurisdiction to Delhi

first_imgThe Bombay High Court at Goa on Monday passed an interim order and stayed the recent order of the Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF) to transfer National Green Tribunal’s (NGT) jurisdiction for Goa. The order directed the petitions from the State to to be filed at the principal bench in Delhi instead of the western zone bench in Pune.Taking suo motu cognisance of the matter, the High Court on Monday appointed Sarath Lotlikar as amicus curie and decided to schedule the hearing of the case for September 5. The interim stay was hailed by the State unit of the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP), which had condemned the MoEF’s decision as illogical and arbitrary. The MoEF order was alleged to be a move by the NDA government to infringe on the independent functioning of the judicial arm of the State and put up hurdles for environmentalists.The AAP alleged that the order was prompted following successful efforts by Goa’s anti-coal pollution activists to stall Adani Group’s expansion plans at the Mormugao Port Trust in Vasco.Abhijit Prabhudesai of Rainbow Warriors, an environmental organisation opposing illegal mining, said that the MoEF order was aimed at discouraging activists from taking up environmental issues with the NGT. Earlier, around 35 environmental groups and civil society organisations had protested against the order and demanded that it be rolled back. The NGOs claimed the order was “anti-people” and vowed to intervene and challenge the decision in court.last_img read more

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Tantalising 36: where it’s a tight fight in Gujarat

first_imgAs the BJP and the Congress again face off in the electoral arena, this time in Gujarat, there is no dearth of big rallies and meta-narratives, all overflowing into the national discourse, as the campaign gains momentum across the State.For the ruling BJP, however, the strategy is not restricted to just that. Away from the big campaign planks is the fight for 36 seats where the victory margin was fewer than 5,000 votes in the 2012 Assembly elections. A senior BJP strategist says the party wants the elections to be fought seat by seat. This is one of the reasons, party leaders say, candidates were not declared on Wednesday evening after the central election committee of the party met.Keshubhai’s gambit“In 2012, the Gujarat Parivartan Party (GPP), floated by former Chief Minister-turned-BJP rebel Keshubhai Patel, was in the fray. In the areas where it fielded candidates, the victory margin was narrow. Of these 38 seats with a margin of fewer than 6,000 votes, the BJP won 14, the Congress 22 and the GPP two,” said a senior leader involved in crafting the BJP’s election strategy. “By our assessment, the GPP had an impact on 16 of these seats by polling more than the margin of victory/loss. The BJP won only three of these 16 seats, one going to the GPP and the rest to the Congress. The GPP polled just 3.63% of the votes, but it polled 10,000 votes in 28 seats, and the BJP lost 11 of these 28 seats,” he said.The party now feels that it has a fair chance to win the 12 seats won by the Congress, as the GPP is not in the fray and the anti-incumbency factor against the Congress MLAs can be leveraged.Almost 10 of the 38 seats decided by a narrow margin of fewer than 1,000 votes and the BJP won only one of them, while the Congress won seven.“Therefore, while the Congress is doing the big rallies and campaign rhetoric and Prime Minister Narendra Modi is yet to hit the trail in Gujarat, for us, it is a seat-by-seat fight of the micro-level contests,” he said.Clearly, the BJP believes victory lies in the details.last_img read more

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Now, U.P. varsity hit by paper leak

first_imgThe Deen Dayal Upadhyaya University Gorakhpur on Tuesday cancelled exams in two subjects after their question papers, one of which matched the original, surfaced on social media.Viral on social mediaThe BSc Part-1 Mathematics and BA Part-2 Sociology papers went viral on social media on Monday, a day before the exams were to be held. A committee formed under Pro Vice-Chancellor S.K. Dixit found that the Mathematics paper was actually leaked while the Sociology paper available on social media didn’t match the actual question paper. The university has informed police about the paper leak. It sent letters to District Magistrates and Superintendents of Police of the concerned districts, drawing their attention to the incident. New datesThe new dates for the two papers will be decided on April 19, university officials said. University spokesman Harsh Sinha said some “miscreants” had tried to create problems. He said the Sociology paper which went viral was based on the previous years’ papers while the Mathematics paper matched the original. “The university didn’t take a risk and decided to cancel both the papers,” he said. He said the V-C has sent letters to the DMs and SPs and the process of registering an FIR had begun.last_img read more

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Demands met, CMCH students end strike

first_imgThe agitating students of Calcutta Medical College and Hospital ended their hunger strike on Monday after the authorities conceded to their demands.The students, who were on strike for 13 days, were demanding that they be shifted to the new hostel building on the premises. They claimed that the main hostel, where the second, third and fourth-year MBBS students were lodged, was in a “deplorable condition”.Initially six students sat on hunger strike on July 10. Two more joined them a couple of days later. Fifteen other students joined the strike last Wednesday. The agitation was withdrawn after the CMCH authorities agreed to provide accommodation to the senior students in two floors of the new 10-storey hostel building.Temporary basis “Two floors of the 10-storeyed building will be allotted to senior unboarded boys after an open and transparent counselling, purely on a temporary basis,” stated a notification issued by the CMCH authorities following a college council meeting during the day. It further stated that the students will have to submit a “signed undertaking” that they will “vacate their accommodation” after the completion of the construction of another hostel building.last_img read more

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Now, Trinamool leaders participate in Ram Navami rallies

first_imgA day after the Bharatiya Janata Party leaders participated in armed Ram Navami rallies, Trinamool Congress leaders and activists participated in such rallies across the State in very large numbers on Sunday. Brandishing armsIn at least one of the rallies in north Bengal, participants were seen carrying machetes and swords. The BJP and other Hindu right-wing factions also participated in similar rallies.Many top TMC leaders, including candidates and Ministers, participated in the Ram Navami rallies. North Bengal’s Raiganj candidate Kanhaiyalal Agarwal, a TMC candidate, was seen at a rally where the participants were brandishing arms. Mr. Agarwal said it was not his responsibility to monitor the rally. “If anything is wrong in the rally, it is the job of the administration to initiate appropriate action,” he said. Among others who attended the rallies included Arup Roy, Ashish Banerjee and Gautam Deb, all Ministers in the TMC Cabinet. Mr. Deb, however, said that they were “not doing any politics” connecting the elections with the rallies, adding, “TMC does not need to do that to win elections”. No one displayed arms in rallies where the Ministers took part, the police said.last_img read more

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Taking the census, with cellphones

first_imgIf you want to figure out how many people live in a particular part of your country, you could spend years conducting home visits and mailing out questionnaires. But a new study describes a quicker way. Scientists have figured out how to map populations using cellphone records—an approach that doesn’t just reveal who lives where, but also where they go every day.“This is the first time people have provided statistical evidence that population data produced from cellphone records are of really good quality,” says applied mathematician Renaud Lambiotte of the University of Namur in Belgium, who was not involved in the study.Ninety-six percent of the world’s people have active cellphone subscriptions. In developed countries, the number of mobile phone subscribers has surpassed the total population as some individuals own more than one phone, and subscription rates continue to rise in developing countries, reaching as high as 90%. That’s great news for census scientists, because they can locate the calls by identifying the cellphone towers that send and receive them and use call density around the phone towers to estimate the local population density.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)As part of WorldPop, an open-source project mapping detailed population information from countries around the world, a team of researchers led by geographer Catherine Linard of the Université Libre de Bruxelles and data scientist Pierre Deville of the Université Catholique de Louvain in Belgium used mobile phone data to estimate population density in France and Portugal. For each country, they obtained aggregate, anonymized call records from major carriers containing more than a billion calls. The call records in Portugal came from 2 million users, covering about 20% of the population. Every call record indicated the originating and receiving phone towers, the timing of the call, and a user identifier—information collected and stored by network providers for billing purposes. Records in France came from 17 million users, about 30% of the population, and contained only the day of the call and the phone tower locations, due to differences in the carrier’s policy.Using the call records, the researchers developed a model to estimate population density around every phone tower from call density, taking into account variations in phone usage between high-coverage and low-coverage areas. The results showed clear trends in population dynamics across weeks and seasons that traditional survey-based censuses can’t reflect, the team reports online today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. During the holiday season, populations in cities dropped sharply, while tourist sites such as coastlines and Disneyland Paris boomed. During the week, people traveled to cities for work on weekdays and back to rural areas on weekends.The researchers also compared their results to population density data gathered through remote sensing technologies, a widely used method that relies on satellite imaging to gather detailed information on population settlement patterns and estimate population counts. They found that the two methods are comparable in accuracy when checked against actual survey-based census data, but estimates from mobile phone data can provide more timely information, down to the hours.Still, the method isn’t perfect, Linard says. To apply it in other countries, the team would need to adjust the model to account for diverse mobile phone usage patterns. Some countries may prefer texting to calls, for example, while others may have many residents who are too poor to own a cellphone. Rather than replacing census surveys, the method would be most effective when combined with technologies like remote sensing, she says.The study shows the merit as well as limitation of big data, says statistician Tom Louis, chief scientist at the U.S. Census Bureau at Suitland, Maryland, who was not involved with the work. Though the information is timely, it is not yet accurate enough for official use, he says. “Big data can be very valuable, but at least at this point in our history, it needs the validation of traditional surveys to show that it works.”But for low-income countries, where census data are likely outdated and unreliable, mobile phone records present an easy and efficient alternative, Linard says. In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, for example, the most recent census took place in 1984. In contrast, about 70% of the people subscribe to mobile phones.With the ongoing Ebola outbreak, cellphone records could provide a valuable tool for tracking population movements, says co-author Andrew Tatem, a geographer at the University of Southampton in United Kingdom who leads the WorldPop project. His organization has used a different model to estimate population flow across affected West African countries, based on cellphone data from Senegal and Ivory Coast. Better access to up-to-date data from the affected countries could lead to more accurate information on population movement that would help governments coordinate responses to the outbreak, he says.last_img read more

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Sewage sludge could contain millions of dollars worth of gold

first_imgIf the holy grail of medieval alchemists was turning lead into gold, how much more magical would it be to draw gold from, well, poop? It turns out that a ton of sludge, the goo left behind when treating sewage, could contain several hundred dollars’ worth of metals—potentially enough to generate millions of dollars worth of gold, silver, and other minerals each year for a city of a million people.Metals have long been known to concentrate in sewage, which mixes toilet water with effluent from industrial manufacturing, storm runoff, and anything else flushed down the drain. It’s a headache for sewage utilities that must cope with toxic metals lacing wastewater headed for streams or sludge that might otherwise be spread on farm fields.But what if those metals had value? In a new study, scientists at Arizona State University (ASU), Tempe, quantified the different metals in sewage sludge and estimated what it all might be worth. They took sludge samples gathered from around the country and measured the metal content using a mass spectrometer that can discern different elements as they are ionized in a superhot plasma. The upshot: There’s as much as $13 million worth of metals in the sludge produced every year by a million-person city, including $2.6 million in gold and silver, they report online this week in Environmental Science & Technology.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)That amount won’t be rattling the world gold market, nor would it be feasible to extract every last bit. But the study’s lead author, environmental engineer Paul Westerhoff, says it could prove worthwhile for cities looking for ways to gain value from something that can be a costly disposal problem. One city in Japan has already tried extracting gold from its sludge. In Suwa in Nagano Prefecture, a treatment plant near a large number of precision equipment manufacturers reportedly collected nearly 2 kilograms of gold in every metric ton of ash left from burning sludge, making it more gold-rich than the ore in many mines.Although no U.S. sewage plants have followed suit, the new study adds to a growing push to rethink sewage as a valuable commodity, says Jordan Peccia, a Yale University engineer who was not involved in the work. Approximately 8 million tons of biosolids—a dried derivative of sludge—are generated every year in the United States.Today, about 60% of the sewage sludge in the United States is already spread on fields and forests as fertilizer. But there are concerns it poses contamination risks from toxic chemicals and pathogens, a subject Peccia’s lab studies. The remaining sludge is burned in incinerators or dumped in landfills.“We’re not going to get rid of this sewage sludge,” Peccia says. “We need to make this push where we stop thinking about it as a liability and instead we think about it as a resource. And anything we can find in sewage sludge that’s valuable, it’s good.”Metals aren’t the only things with potential value. A small number of sewage plants are removing phosphorous and nitrogen, which can be sold as fertilizer. A Swedish treatment plant is testing the feasibility of making bioplastics from wastewater. A model sewage incinerator that generates electricity and drinking water was just promoted by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which helped fund its construction.But it could be a while before wastewater operators start prospecting for precious metals in more than an isolated case. The minerals found in the sludge were frequently dissolved or in microscopic particles. Rare earth elements were so dilute that they were present in levels similar to those in plain dirt.Precious metals such as gold could find their way into the sewers courtesy of mining, electroplating, electronics and jewelry manufacturing, or industrial and automotive catalysts. The sludge in the study came from two Arizona treatment plants and from a mixture of samples from around the country stored at ASU’s U.S. National Biosolids Repository.Focusing on 13 of the most concentrated minerals with the highest value, the scientists put the haul at $280 per ton, or $8 million for that hypothetical million-person city. That included such precious metals as platinum, gold, and silver, as well as more common copper, iron, and zinc. A metric ton of sludge contained 16.7 grams of silver and about a third of a gram of gold. Even then, the practical value could be less, as the estimate was based on extracting every bit of the metals.The study doesn’t spell out the potential cost of getting at these metals or the price society pays for leaving them in the sludge, such as added pollution. “The next thing is to look at whether it’s economically or technically viable,” Westerhoff says. “We think it is.”Cost is one of the chief barriers keeping sewage treatment plants from going for the gold, says Charles Bott, chief of research and development at the Hampton Roads Sanitation District in Virginia Beach, which serves 1.7 million people in southeastern Virginia. The district started extracting phosphorous and nitrogen from sludge at one of its plants in 2010 to comply with stricter protections for Chesapeake Bay. Mining sludge is “a hot topic of conversation,” Bott says. “It’s just a question of getting to the point where the technology is available that makes the finances work out.”last_img read more

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British-Indian Minister To Lead UK Business Team In Indore

first_imgA major UK business delegation to Global Investors Summit in Madhya Pradesh will be led by a British Minister of Indian origin. Related Itemslast_img

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UK indies body pacts with Indian

first_imgBritish indies body Pact is today signing a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with the Producers Guild of India.The partnership is designed to increase production between the UK and India, with better trade links between the countries critical for Britain in a post-Brexit world.Read it at TB Vision Related Itemslast_img

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The Special Way Rural India is Learning to Read

first_imgIn its Annual Status of Education Report (ASER) 2017, the Pratham Education Foundation, a non-profit working towards improving learning outcomes for rural children, found that nearly 25% of rural youth between the age of 14 and 18 cannot read in their own language.What this story tells us is that a lot of children are falling through the cracks of our public education system. Besides uncertain economic outcomes for students growing up in the system, the inability to read in their own language has the potential to shatter their self-confidence—the one human characteristic that has the potential to change lives drastically.Read it at The Better India Related Itemslast_img

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Dream of Happy Life With NRI Hubbies Shattered

first_imgGetting a nice groom is difficult. It is further difficult if he is a high salaried NRI. But dream gets shattered if the groom found to be a wrong one as has happened in case of two innocent girls of Sambalpur town. Read it at Daily Pioneer Related Itemslast_img

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Immigration Deform

first_imgSince 2000, India has been the second largest source of immigrants to the United States, after only Mexico. You would not know that from the debate in the Senate as the most dramatic change in immigration law in 20 years is railroaded through Congress.In fact, the immigration discussion is shaped almost entirely around the “crisis” of illegal immigration and the “solution” of the guest worker program, both of which principally center around agricultural, construction and unskilled laborers from Mexico. But issues for immigrants of virtually all countries other than Mexico are markedly different. Mexico accounts for a sixth of all legal migration to the United States and to shake up the infrastructure of legal immigration for 85 percent of the rest of the world by focusing solely on 15 percent would be naïve, however urgent and politically sensitive the issues.Tragically those impacted most by the policies – immigrants, including Mexican – are peripheral to the debate. We will all be impacted by the resulting policies, but we have no role in shaping the discussion. Come to think of it, even the American public is pretty much excluded as the comprehensive immigration reform bill is bamboozled through Congress without full public disclosure, much less debate. Many of the terms of the bill are still unknown or unclear. It continues to be amended, so there is no knowing its final shape – if it doesn’t self-destruct along the way.The broad contours of the bill are known: a path to legalization for the estimated 12 million illegal aliens in the country, although the onerous conditions and costs might make it impractical for most of them; a guest worker program for seasonal laborers, already halved by an amendment from 400,000 to 200,000 annually; and a major overhaul of immigration laws currently favoring family reunification to one deferential to professional skills. As currently drafted, the law would also double the number of H1B visas, almost half of which are snapped up by Indians every year, from 65,000 to 115,000.But the devil is not just in the details of these provisions, but equally in the hundreds of lesser-known revisions to immigration laws in the 1,000-page bill. By far the most dramatic shift will occur in family based immigration, which currently enables immigrants and naturalized Americans to sponsor family members, such as parents and siblings. In its place, the new law will create a point-based system, similar to one in Canada, favoring skilled workers and professionals. Last year, only a sixth of all immigrant visas were employment based. Almost three-quarters were for family reunification. The point system will overturn the country’s immigration ethos on its head and while that may well prove meritorious, there has been no debate or serious research on its implications.The American public, as well as the immigrants impacted by it, deserve thorough public disclosure and substantive deliberations. Anything less will be disastrous both for the country and for immigrants.  Related Itemslast_img read more

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India’s Missing Girls

first_imgStanding in front of his small brick home, in a courtyard where the dirt has been packed down by generations of barefoot children, the middle-aged mustard farmer doesn’t bother to hide his exhaustion.“Only someone who has been through something like this can understand the size of my catastrophe,” said Sukhpal Singh Tomar. For years, he has struggled to find some reason for his suffering, but has come up with little. He shrugged: “It must be my karma.”The catastrophe? His daughters – all eight – so many he sometimes stumbles over their names. But his wife, Shanti, never forgets, and the words spill from her like a breathless prayer: “Anu-Jyoti-Poonam-Roshni-Sheetal-Bindu-Chandni-Shezal.” They have been born in a country leaping headfirst into the globalized world but still holding tight to a preference for boys, enlarging an ever-widening gender imbalance in the second most populous nation on earth.Tomar, 50, said his wife had also had three abortions. Asked if the intent had been to abort female fetuses, he looked silently at the ground.“It would have been easier to have a son. Even just one,” said Shanti, 38, whose stringy hair and worn skin make her look 20 years older. She’s holding their youngest girl, 3-month-old Shezal.Much has changed in this village since the Tomars’ first daughter was born 19 years ago. Electricity arrived, and later the first cell phones. The number of tractors has quadrupled. Today, the village’s girls attend the local primary school just like its boys.“There’s more money here now, and more education. But it’s still in the back of everyone’s mind: ‘I must have a male child,”‘ said Madhur Gurhan, the obstetrician who runs the public hospital’s maternity ward in Morena, the largest nearby city. “The money doesn’t change that.”It has long been clear that India has a deep-seated preference for boys. By 2001, researchers estimated the country had anywhere from 20 million to 40 million “missing” girls from sex-selective abortions made available through the spread of ultrasound technology.But as India modernizes – as places like Singhpura become small towns, as towns become cities and as India’s once-overwhelming poverty is slowly supplanted by an increasingly educated middle class that wants fewer children – researchers say the problem is only getting worse.“We’re now dealing with attitudes that are spreading,” said Sabu George, a prominent activist against the practice. “It’s frightening what we’re heading to.”While the next national census will not be done until 2011, giving a detailed overall picture, study after study has found an increasingly grim situation even as India’s middle class grows.While researchers once thought education and wealth would dampen the preference for boys, the reverse has turned out to be true.According to UNICEF, about 7,000 fewer girls than expected are born every day in India. The British medical journal The Lancet estimates that up to 500,000 female fetuses are being aborted every year. This in a country where abortion is legal but sex-determination tests were outlawed in 1991 – a law nearly impossible to enforce, since ultrasound tests leave no trace.For a recent report, the group ActionAid sent interviewers to 6,000 households in five north Indian regions. In Punjab state, researchers found rural areas with just 500 girls for every 1,000 boys, and communities of high-caste urbanites with just 300 girls per 1,000.Around Morena, in an increasingly urbanized part of Madhya Pradesh state, the 2001 census found a total of 851 girls per 1,000 boys – a number ActionAid found had dropped to 842.Researchers say pressure for smaller families is the most immediate problem.“Squeeze on family size is fueling the trend,” said ActionAid researcher Jyoti Sapru. “For households expressing preference for one child only, they want to make sure it is a son.”If India is changing dramatically, the rationale for preferring boys remains fixed: Boys don’t need the dowries that can cripple a family financially; boys stay home after marrying and help care for aging parents; Hinduism dictates that only boys can light their parents’ funeral pyres. Over the past decade, the government and aid agencies have spent millions of dollars on everything from poster campaigns to television ads to soap operas, all urging families to accept daughters. Governments have repeatedly vowed to crack down on clinics that perform sex-determination tests, yet these remain readily available.Around here, they cost about $60, or five times the cost of a legal ultrasound. Prosecutions are extremely rare.The number of lost girls is almost sure to increase.India’s growing middle class means far more people can afford ultrasound tests. Increased urbanization means easier access to the machines. And as family sizes drop, the pressure to have boys intensifies.The statistics tell this story starkly: In 1981, when ultrasound technology was rare here, India had 962 girls for every 1,000 boys. That’s roughly what nature dictates.But by 1991, as ultrasound technology began spreading, 962 had tumbled to 945. Ten years later, it was 927. In some parts of the country, particularly parts of north India where the preference for boys can be traced back for centuries, the ratio plummeted.What remains unclear are the long-term affects. Activists say the laws of supply and demand don’t apply in the face of such powerful cultural norms – and the shortage of potential brides has done nothing to make girls seem more valuable.“The girl is like someone else’s property – she’s going to leave one day,” said Hema Singhal, an ob-gyn who runs a small medical center in Morena with her husband.Tomar, a man drowning in daughters, is an aberration in his village.“Look around, you don’t see many other girls here,” he said.While no one will admit openly to having sex-selective abortions, the practice is clearly common. It’s clear in nearby villages, where girls are rarely seen. It’s clear in classrooms, where boys can outnumber girls by five to one.It’s very clear in the birth records in Gurhan’s maternity ward, in a desperately underfunded and filthy government hospital, where nearly every day the newborn boys outnumber the girls.Clusters of grandmothers stand outside the delivery room, waiting to carry their newborn grandchildren to the recovery rooms.When it’s a boy, their faces are lit with a protective gaze.But if it’s a girl the grimness is often palpable. And the mothers-in-law plod behind the mother’s gurney, walking unlit hallways scattered with litter.   Related Itemslast_img read more

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