Ben Bradlee, Legendary Washington Post Editor, Dead

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Benjamin C. Bradlee, the legendary editor of The Washington Post who led its newsroom for 26 years, oversaw the reporting of the Watergate scandal and inspired countless journalists, died Tuesday, according to the newspaper.He was 93.Bradlee, forever cemented in the annals of American journalism as the no-nonsense, take-no-prisoners-in-your-pursuit-of-the-truth editor guiding the paper during its reportage and exposing of the Watergate political scandal—which led to the resignation of President Richard Nixon—and Pentagon Papers, is known as one of the most celebrated and revered of the craft, not just for his transformation of the metropolitan daily into one of the most reputable, and formidable newspapers in the world, but for his larger-than-life character, dedication to the finest virtues of the craft and undeniable magnetism that infected and inspired generations of writers, reporters and editors to strive for his emulation.“From the moment he took over The Post newsroom in 1965, Mr. Bradlee sought to create an important newspaper that would go far beyond the traditional model of a metropolitan daily,” writes The Post. “He achieved that goal by combining compelling news stories based on aggressive reporting with engaging feature pieces of a kind previously associated with the best magazines. His charm and gift for leadership helped him hire and inspire a talented staff and eventually made him the most celebrated newspaper editor of his era.”Bradlee would lead The Post to 17 Pulitzer Prizes during his tenure, open bureaus across the country, station correspondents around the globe, and found sections of the paper copied by many others, notes The Post.In 2013 President Barack Obama awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award of the United States.Journalists and news outlets flooded social media sites with memories and tributes to Bradlee following The Post‘s announcement of his passing.“Ben Bradlee was the best American newspaper editor of his time and had the greatest impact on his newspaper of any modern editor,” former Washington Post Publisher Don Graham told the newspaper Tuesday.Just as legendary as Bradlee’s journalistic accomplishments (and his take-no-BS attitude) was the size and openness of his heart–for years taking the time to meet, and share tales and tips, with everyone from aspiring journalism students to veteran muckrakers; even starry-eyed, lowly, bloodthirsty interns.They carry him with them. His relentless passion, and fury, burn on within their words.Rest in peace.last_img read more

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Pennsylvania credit union helps undercover cops nab Instagram fraudsters

first_img 16SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » The $5 billion Pennsylvania State Employees Credit Union in Harrisburg worked with undercover police investigation that led to the arrest of three Philadelphia men who allegedly used Instagram to steal from financial institutions.Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro said Tuesday that Shakour S. Smith, 26, Ikeem M. Starks, 25, and Quadir J. Burley, 18, were charged with multiple felonies following an investigation that is still under way by the AG’s Organized Crime Section.Smith, Starks, and Burley used Instagram to recruit people who allowed their accounts at banks in Philadelphia and Montgomery counties to be used to carry out the fraud. The suspects posted bank logos on Instagram and enticed people to “like” their posts. The criminals then obtained account information from the people who responded, promising them a cut of the money they planned to steal.Pennsylvania authorities said the trio stole more than $50,000 from various financial institutions, including PSECU. However, the other financial institutions have not been identified yet because the investigation is ongoing and more charges are expected to be filed, Shapiro said.last_img read more

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Man charged with multiple drug-related felonies following raid

first_imgThe Broome County Special Investigations Unit Task Force says 42-year-old Demetrius Drummond of Binghamton was charged with three criminal possession of a controlled substance in the 3rd degree (sub 1) and one count criminal possession of a controlled substance in the in the 3rd degree (sub 12), both felonies. Police say 62 grams of fentanyl, two grams of cocaine and drug packaging materials were found in the residence. He was also charged with three counts of criminally using drug paraphernalia in the 2nd degree, a misdemeanor.center_img (WBNG) — Authorities charged one person Wednesday after the execution of a narcotics search warrant on Tremont Avenue in Binghamton.last_img

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Take action to bring end to climate change

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion Climate change/global warming is the most important issue we face today. If we don’t do something to mitigate it, all our other issues will be moot, because we will be in the process of going extinct, along with the rest of God’s creation. Almost 100 percent of our scientists believe that this is so. The ones who express doubt are the ones on the payroll of fossil fuel companies.This is what climate change scientist Kevin Anderson has to say: “If our developing nations’ emissions peak in 2030, and decline at 3 percent per year thereafter, and if our developed nations’ emissions peak in 2015 (which they have not), and decline at 3 percent thereafter, we have a 50:50 chance of limiting global warming to 4 degrees C.”  This is equivalent to about 9 degrees F.  This could be happening as early as the 2060s.What will happen?  Seas will rise, droughts and fires will increase, as will hurricanes and floods. Species will be lost. As for humans, we will be stressed for water and food, forced to move by rising sea levels, stressed by heat waves and disease. People will have to migrate to survive, causing wars, chaos and social and economic breakdown. Do you have children and grandchildren?  Do you want to see them go through this? I don’t. Please, conserve fossil fuels, give up eating beef, encourage your congressmen to take the subsidies off fossil fuels and beef, and ask them to encourage clean, renewable energy.Jahnn Swanker-GibsonJohnstownMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationlast_img read more

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In Pennsylvania, a Trump-Biden battle on uneven ground

first_imgDoor-to-door canvassing and weekly rallies for Donald Trump, while Joe Biden’s campaign avoids both due to the coronavirus: Democrats in Pennsylvania’s rural counties are battling to win back the key electoral state, but the pandemic is not making it easy.The difference between the Republican and Democratic efforts in Pennsylvania’s Washington County, in the distant suburbs of Pittsburgh, is stark this election season: three tents welcomed the president’s supporters this weekend, as team Biden tried to stick to public health guidelines by organizing primarily online.Trump backers without anti-virus masks, arrived by the dozens to pick up yard signs and T-shirts emblazoned with the slogan “Make America Great Again” in an atmosphere akin to a family reunion. Topics : Reinvigorated voters Republican county official Dave Ball said that caution won’t do much to counter the lack of enthusiasm for Biden, who already faced a tough battle locally due to his environmental stance.Ball said 2016 Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton hit a nail into her electoral coffin when she advocated to close coal mines.2020’s version could be shale gas fracking, an industry that in recent years has become key to the region, with tens of thousands of jobs directly or indirectly linked.The Pennsylvania-born Biden has previously said he would block the issuing of new permits on public land, but stated just last week he would not ban shale gas fracking, despite his emphasis on moving away from fossil fuels in order to battle climate change.But according to Republican Ball, that pledge may not carry much weight locally: “those words came out of his mouth… but I don’t believe that he is committed to it,” he said, pointing to a number of prominent Democratic figures who denounce fracking and the fossil fuel industry.A few figures might justify his confidence. In this county that stood solidly Democratic before swinging for Trump in 2016, the gap between registered Democrats and Republicans is narrowing.The year Trump was elected, there were more than 14,000 registered Democrats than Republicans, says Ball.Today that margin has shrunk to 2,000 in favor of the Democrats.At a rally this weekend, at least one former Democrat registered for the rival party for the first time.”I haven’t voted for years,” said Martin Angelo, a 64-year-old retired miner. “Trump made me want to vote again.” A day prior, state representative Tim O’Neal had walked along the county’s hills to rally Republican supporters, saying he has knocked on 3,500 doors since late June.But on the Democratic side, “we are not canvassing door-to-door,” says Christina Proctor, the local Democratic party’s vice chair. “We don’t want to put our volunteers at risk.””I am frustrated with that, I do feel they (Trump’s campaign) are creating some enthusiasm with their events and they are still knocking doors and because we are taking the pandemic so seriously, we are not doing that — I am concerned that that will put us at a disadvantage,” she said just two months out from the November 3 vote.The local Biden campaign team, wearing face masks, hands out its yard signs from its office.  ‘Unpredictable’ The county’s Democrats concede they have work to do, but plan to fight.Bill Tasczak is getting involved in a campaign for the first time, phonebanking for Biden after having voted in the past for Republicans Ronald Reagan and George Bush Sr.”I hate Donald Trump and all he is about,” the 71-year-old said.A possible second Trump term “concerns me — that’s why I am getting involved this year.”Likewise Brian Still, a 67-year-old retail worker, says “this election cycle is the most important in my lifetime.””The division that’s been sown… I have never seen anything like it.””You can feel it in the air, you can cut it with a knife.”Democratic official Proctor, who became politically engaged after feeling shocked post-Trump election, thinks the determination of these volunteers could make the difference.Trump captured Pennsylvania by only a narrow majority of 44,000 votes in 2016, she emphasized, meaning Democrats just need to close the gap in a few key counties to beat him back.”If we could get 5,000 additional votes in Washington County for Joe Biden, we will have done our job to hand Pennsylvania to Joe Biden”,” she said.Recent polls suggest the race will be close in Pennsylvania, though nationally Biden has the lead.O’Neal, the Republican representative knocking on doors, says he’s seeing first-hand that voters’ reactions are unpredictable when it comes to Trump.”I have had what I thought were hardcore Republicans who weren’t supportive of him, and hardcore Democrats who were,” he said.”President Trump is one of those politicians that really is not defined necessarily by party.”last_img read more

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Wednesday people roundup

first_imgEuropean Commission – Kerstin Jorna has been appointed deputy director-general in the Commission’s department for Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN). Taking up her new position on 16 December, she will be in charge of the European Fund for Strategic Investments (EFSI), the fund at the heart of the Commission’s Investment Plan for Europe. Jorna joined the Commission in 1990, rising to head of cabinet for internal market and financial services commissioner Michel Barnier, and then a director in 2012. She is director for Single Market Policy, Regulation and Implementation in the Commission’s department for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs.Alcentra – The alternative fixed income manager has appointed Nicholas Pont as managing director and senior institutional marketer. He joins from PIMCO, where he was head of UK and Ireland business development. Sam Morse has been appointed executive director and institutional marketer for the UK. He joins from Muzinich & Co, where he was sales director.KB First Pension Company – Macedonia’s KB First Pension Company is now being run by Vesna Stojanovska, general manager and president of the management board, and Filip Nikoloski, member of the management board. Former head Janko Trenkoski has left the pension fund to run his own business, R3 Infomedia.SVB – Ruud van Es and Coen van de Louw have been named as members of the executive board of the Sociale Verzekeringsbank (SVB), responsible for the payment of the Dutch state pension AOW. Van Es has been working in several positions for the SVB since 2005, while Van de Louw has been head of inspection at the Social Affairs Ministry, a director for work and income in Amsterdam and unit head at the Dutch Inland Revenue.Pensions Infrastructure Platform – Paul Gill has been recruited as an investment manager, having previously worked at Lloyds Banking Group Asset Management as an associate director, specialising in infrastructure and energy.AEW – Hans Vrensen has joined as European head of research and strategy, based in London. Vrensen was global head of research at DTZ from 2009 to 2015. Prior to joining DTZ in 2009, he was head of European securitisation research at Barclays Capital. He has also worked as a consultant at Green Street Advisors and CREFC Europe.Erste Asset Management (EAM) – Wolfgang Zemanek has been appointed head of fixed income at the Austrian asset manager, reporting to Gerold Permoser, CIO. Zemanek has worked at EAM since 1999, most recently as senior fund manager, government bonds and foreign currencies. Skagen, Norges Bank Investment Management, APG Group, Lithuanian Financial Markets Institute, European Commission, DG ECFIN, Alcentra, PIMCO, Muzinich & Co, KB First Pension Company, Sociale Verzekeringsbank, Pensions Infrastructure Platform, Lloyds Banking Group Asset Management, AEW, DTZ, Erste Asset ManagementSkagen – Norwegian asset manager Skagen has named Norges Bank Investment Management’s (NBIM) Øyvind Schanke as its next chief executive. Schanke is CIO for asset strategies at NBIM, where he oversees equity and fixed income portfolios for the NOK7.3trn (€802bn) Government Pension Fund Global. He will start in his new role from 1 February 2017.APG Group – The €444bn APG Group has appointed Dick van Well as a member of its supervisory board (RvC). Van Well has more than 35 years of experience in management and board positions at building company Dura Vermeer, where he has been executive chairman. He is a member of the RvC at Dura Vermeer, gas and power grid manager Stedin Netbeheer and Multi Corporation, a developer, owner and manager of shopping centres.Lithuanian Financial Markets Institute (LFMI) – Marijus Kalesinskas has joined the LFMI as chief executive. He succeeds Gerda Žigienė, who had returned to her academic career but remains a senior adviser on academic matters at LFMI. Kalesinskas has previously worked in various managerial and specialist roles in several financial and other institutions, including the Bank of Lithuania, MC Wealth Management, SEB, Swedbank, ISM University of Management and Economics and the Lithuanian Association of Pension Fund Participants.last_img read more

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UK roundup: FTSE 350 companies ‘could de-risk at low or no cost’

first_imgAlistair Russell-Smith, head of corporate DB at Hymans Robertson, said many companies could find they were “closer than they think” to offloading their DB schemes altogether.However, he also warned that less well funded schemes should be on the lookout for intervention from the Pensions Regulator (TPR). As part of its new approach – with the tagline “quicker, clearer, tougher” – the UK regulator has pushed for a more even balance between dividend payments and pension scheme contributions.Russell-Smith said that “a minority of companies should plan for regulatory intervention at their next triennial valuation unless they pay more into their schemes”. He added: “22% of FTSE 350 companies with a DB pension scheme are paying over five times more in dividends than pension contributions, despite contributions at this level taking over eight years to pay off the IAS19 deficit.”Rentokil seals £1.5bn de-risking deal The majority of the UK’s biggest listed companies could pay off their defined benefit (DB) scheme deficits with less than six months’ earnings, according to research by Hymans Robertson.After a period of favourable movements in asset prices and liabilities, a number of FTSE 350 company schemes were also in a position to transfer their schemes to insurers or commercial pension fund consolidators with little or no cash injection needed, the consultancy group said.As much as 90% could pay for an insurance buyout using just six months’ corporate earnings, Hymans Robertson found.The company reported that 12% of schemes were fully funded on an insurance buyout basis, meaning sponsoring employers would not need to pay extra to de-risk their pension arrangements. A further 9% could transfer their DB schemes to a commercial consolidator at a cost of “less than one month’s earnings”, the group added.  Rentokil Initial’s planned DB scheme buyout will be one of the UK’s largestFTSE 100 listed pest control and hygiene company Rentokil Initial has agreed a £1.5bn (€1.7bn) insurance buy-in with Pension Insurance Corporation (PIC) at no extra cost to the company.The agreement – which covers more than 14,000 members – has been designed to lead up to a full buyout, scheduled for 2020, to take the Rentokil Initial 2015 Pension Scheme off the company’s balance sheet.When complete, the buyout would be one of the biggest such transactions undertaken in the UK, PIC said in a statement. The transaction was the insurer’s biggest of 2018.The DB scheme had an accounting surplus of £373.2m as of 30 June 2018. Once the buyout is complete, PIC estimated that there would be “a small cash surplus”, to be returned to the employer.John Baines, partner at Aon, the scheme’s adviser, said Rentokil had secured “very attractive pricing during the busiest ever year in the bulk annuity market”.“The deal was made possible by reacting quickly to wider market developments in order to bring together an attractively priced, innovative and bespoke agreement,” Baines added.PIC’s head of business development Mitul Magudia said his company had a “full pipeline” of transactions for 2019 after a busy year in 2018. “We expect to see many more transactions of similar size and nature in the future,” he added.Listed companies’ pension shortfall improvesConsultancy giant Mercer has estimated that FTSE 350 companies’ collective DB scheme shortfall reduced from £36bn to £17bn during November.The aggregate funding level rose to 98%, from 95% at the end of October. While asset values fell from £759bn to £750bn in total, collective liabilities also declined, from £795bn to £767bn. This was due to rising corporate bond yields and a decline in market-implied inflation, Mercer said.LeRoy van Zyl, DB strategist at Mercer, said: “This is a meaningful reduction in the deficit but, as we approach the end of the year and as the government attempts to get the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement through parliament, trustees should evaluate the potential impact of political uncertainty on their sponsor’s financial security and put themselves in a position to capitalise on de-risking opportunities as they arise.”last_img read more

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WHO denies concluding PH leads West Pac nations in COVID-19 rise

first_imgMANILA – It is “unfair” to say that the World Health Organization (WHO) had concluded that the Philippines is leading the rise in coronavirus cases in the Western Pacific region, its country representative said Monday following comments from government officials. From June 16 to 28, WHO said the total number of new cases in the Philippines was recorded at 9,655. The cases by date of report within the last 30 days in the country has stood out on WHO’s data. Abeyasinghe made the remark after broadsheet Philippine Daily Inquirer published an analysis report, which states that the Philippines has the most number of new cases from June 17 to 23, and has the fastest seven-day moving average. “We are in control of the situation,” he added. “We’re confident that we have done [the] correct steps and again I’m saying we’re not perfect but I think we did the best that we can do under the circumstance.” Also, based on the data showing the total confirmed cases of countries plotted against their doubling rate, the trend in the Philippines is actively rising near Singapore./PN Both Malacañang and the Department of Health have since reacted to the report, defending the country’s response to the virus outbreak.center_img “The World Health Organization does not compare countries or makes such assessments,” WHO Philippine representative Dr. Rabindra Abeyasinghe clarified during the Laging Handa virtual press conference on Tuesday. “We beg to disagree,” Presidential spokesperson Harry Roque said in a virtual press conference. “If you look at the WHO, I think we checked this and in the data of the WHO they are classified as Western Pacific countries (India, Pakistan and Bangladesh).” “The World Health Organization never made such a comment or an assessment,” he added. “The World Health Organization (WHO) does not compare countries or makes such assessments,” clarifies Dr. Rabindra Abeyasinghe, Philippine representative of WHO. PCOOlast_img read more

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Top-two water polo teams battle for bragging rights

first_imgThe top-two women’s water polo teams in the country will face off on Saturday when No. 1 USC hosts No. 2 UCLA in the second meeting this season of the crosstown rivals.This will be the third time the Women of Troy have faced the Bruins, first beating UCLA in February during the Triton Invitational Championship game. USC won the title with an 8-6 victory.USC and UCLA faced off in another title match during the championship game of the UCI Invitational in late February. The Trojans came out with a 10-7 win.“Even though we’ve already defeated UCLA earlier in the season, we need to focus on our game and play hard on offense and stop them on defense,” sophomore goalie Victoria Chamorro said.USC has been handling teams on the defensive side of the game, allowing a MPSF-leading 4.53 goals per game. Chamorro returns as an All-American from last year and is averaging 7.2 saves in her 30 periods of play.The other standout goalie for the Women of Troy is freshman Amanda Longan who is averaging 8.7 saves during her 32 periods in the net.USC’s own offensive prowess has allowed them to put up double-digit goals in 11 of their games so far this season. The Women of Troy (17-0, 3-0 MPSF) are second in the conference in goals scored with 12.59 goals per game and have outscored their opponents 214-77 over the course of the season.The leading goal-scorer for USC is junior driver Stephania Haralabidis with 46 goals — a number good enough to put her at No. 9 on the all-time goals scored list with 160 in her career. Just behind her is her sister, junior driver Ioanna Haralabidis who has scored 31 goals during the season.“Next week we want to focus on recognizing our opportunities on offense and forcing more turnovers on defense,” Stephania Haralibidis said. “We need to keep our intensity high.”The emphasis for USC will be on stopping UCLA’s high-powered offense. The Bruins (20-2, 3-0 MPSF) won their three games last weekend by a combined score of 61-11. Other than their two losses to USC, the Bruins have yet to lose a game this season. UCLA top-two goal scorers have each found the back of the net 32 times this season.“We need to be patient. It’s important that we take our time and watch the goalie so we can convert as many opportunities as possible,” sophomore utility Hayley McKelvey said. “We also really need to play hard on defense.”The two wins this season for USC snapped a losing streak of five games to UCLA including last year’s 7-9 loss in the MPSF tournament semifinals. UCLA owns the all-time record though with a 49-24 advantage over the Trojans. The rivalry game will begin at 1 p.m. on Saturday at the Uytengsu Aquatic Center.The Women of Troy won’t stop there though. Following their game against UCLA, USC has a non-conference game with Redlands slated to begin at 2:30 p.m. The Bulldogs (5-20) recently suffered a 5-20 loss against UCLA. USC holds an 8-1 record all-time against Redlands with the most recent game being a 31-0 win last year.last_img read more

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