In praise of John Hope Franklin

first_imgDURHAM, N.C. — John Hope Franklin, a scholar who helped create the field of African-American history, was instrumental both in documenting America’s long and long-ignored legacy of slavery and racism and in reaffirming the continuing importance of that history, Harvard President Drew Faust said during an event Thursday evening commemorating his life and scholarship.“John Hope Franklin wrote history — discovering neglected and forgotten dimensions of the past, mining archives with creativity and care, building in the course of his career a changed narrative of the American experience and the meaning of race within it,” she said. “But John Hope also meditated about history and its place in the world, on its role as action as well as description, on history itself as causal agent, and on the writing of history as mission as well as profession.”President Drew Faust was among those celebrating the 100th anniversary of the birth of scholar John Hope Franklin, who received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1941. In 1983, Franklin was appointed the James B. Duke Professor of History at Duke University. Credit: Duke PhotographyFranklin was born in 1915 and raised in segregated Oklahoma. Graduating from Fisk University in 1935, he earned a Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1941. Over the course of his career, he held faculty posts at a number of institutions, including Howard University and the University of Chicago, before being appointed in 1983 the James B. Duke Professor of History at Duke University. “From Slavery to Freedom: A History of African-Americans,” published in 1947, is still considered a definitive account of the black experience in America. A lecture series later published as a book, “Racial Equality in America,” became another of his most iconic works. Franklin died in 2009.An American historian herself, Faust gave the keynote address in the last of a yearlong series of events as part of the John Hope Franklin Centenary, sponsored by Duke University to mark the 100th anniversary of his birth.Reflecting on both the raging debate about the state of race relations in America after violent incidents in such locations as Ferguson, Mo., as well as on the glimpses of progress that came in their wake — including the removal of the Confederate flag from near the South Carolina capitol — Faust argued that Americans must remember our “shameful legacy” as we take stock of where we stand today.“And in that effort [Franklin] has also done something more — for history itself — insisting not just upon its relevance,” she said, “but indeed its pre-eminence as the indispensable instrument of change and even salvation from legacies that left unexamined will destroy us. ‘Good history,’ he remarked in 2003, ‘is a good foundation for a better present and future.’ ”Correcting the historical record was Franklin’s critical contribution to that future, she said.“For John Hope Franklin, history was a calling and a weapon, a passion and a project,” Faust said. “Fundamental to the task at hand would be to revise the ‘hallowed’ falsehoods, to illustrate how the abuse and misuse of history served to legitimate systems of oppression not just in the past but in the present as well.”The post-Civil War South had endeavored to “win with the pen what they had failed to win with the sword,” she said, quoting Franklin.Even the election of Barack Obama as America’s first African-American president during the last months of Franklin’s life was insufficient, in his view, to exorcise the remnants of racism.“He dared hope that the nation had ‘turn[ed] a significant corner.’ But he knew that erasing the color line required far more than electing a black president. Until we had a new history, we could not build a different and better future,” Faust said. “In other words, it is history that has the capacity to save us.“ ‘Historians to the rescue!’ ” she proclaimed, quoting Franklin.Recalling how other nations had confronted difficult pasts — Germany and the Nazis, South Africa and apartheid — Faust argued that America must do the same by infusing the work of historians into public policy and national discourse.“Only a collective investigation and acknowledgement of past wrongs can exorcise them and liberate a nation and a people for a better future,” she said. “History must move beyond the academy, must become a recognized part of everyday life and understanding for all those who would themselves be free from its weight.”Faust concluded her remarks by tying Franklin’s revelations about African-American history to the current dialogue about race in America, asking if the nation is now prepared to confront the truth — and the history — of yesterday’s injustices in order to create a better tomorrow.“If so, it is in no small part because of the kind of history John Hope Franklin dared to write and the ideals he represented as he walked the ‘tightrope’ between engagement and objectivity, as he struggled to unite history with policy and meaningful change, as he sought truths to save us all. Black lives matter. History matters. John Hope Franklin showed us how much they matter to each other,” she concluded.The three-day symposium, titled “Global Slaveries|Impossible Freedoms: The Intellectual Legacies of John Hope Franklin,” is scheduled to include a series of panels exploring topics that Franklin highlighted during his long career.Sven Beckert, Laird Bell Professor of History at Harvard, was among the many participating faculty from institutions of higher education across America. The author of, among other works, “Empire of Cotton: A Global History” and, with a group of students, “Harvard and Slavery: Seeking a Forgotten History,” Beckert was scheduled to participate in a panel titled “Slavery, Racism, and Capitalism.”last_img read more

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Hollister explains revised guidance on endowment

first_img The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. The COVID-19 pandemic has created significant and immediate financial challenges for colleges and universities. Many institutions of higher learning are faced with difficult decisions about the best way to manage declining revenue coupled along with increased investment to continue supporting an environment of academic excellence amid new health protocols.At Harvard, the Corporation has fiduciary responsibility for the University’s academic, financial, and physical resources, and overall well-being. The Gazette spoke with Thomas J. Hollister, Harvard’s vice president for finance and chief financial officer, to learn more about the Corporation’s revised endowment guidance for the 2021 fiscal year.Q&AThomas J. HollisterGAZETTE: Distributions from the endowment provide a critical source of funding to support the University’s mission of teaching and research. What is the process for setting the endowment distribution? HOLLISTER: It is indeed a critical source of funding, in fact, the University’s largest, at 35 percent of revenue. Between past gifts to the endowment and current giving, the generosity of Harvard donors creates 43 percent of the annual funding for the budget.The accumulated wisdom of endowment management over many decades suggests that if you are distributing as little as 4 percent of the market value of the endowment, you are probably hoarding too much, and if you are paying out at the 6 percent level or higher, you are probably being fiscally irresponsible, because distributions cannot be sustained at those levels in perpetuity.Harvard in particular uses a formula to smooth the impact of fluctuating market values and provide budget stability for Schools and units. Similar to our peers in higher education, we generally target to distribute about 5 percent of the market value, which is roughly $2 billion a year on a roughly $40 billion endowment. However, it is the Corporation that makes the annual decision.GAZETTE: You have previously mentioned in this space that Harvard intends to distribute as much from the endowment as it responsibly can. Can you give us insight into the Corporation’s recent decision to revise the fiscal 2021 endowment guidance from a 2 percent decrease to a flat percentage change in the dollar amount of the distribution?HOLLISTER: I did mention this previously, as did President [Larry] Bacow, Provost [Alan] Garber, and Executive Vice President [Katie] Lapp in a message to the Harvard community in the spring, that the intention is not to hoard the endowment but to actively use it as much as can be responsibly done.The recent decision to make a change in the distribution has to do with some inherent timing tension in the process. The Schools and units want early guidance on what the endowment distribution will be so they can build their budgets for a fiscal year beginning on July 1. The challenge is that this early guidance requires a prediction of the endowment’s market value on June 30 many months in advance.When the Corporation first decided to reduce the distribution by minus 2 percent, it was shortly after the Dow Industrial Average and the S&P were down 30 and 25 percent, respectively. Fortunately, the market recovered and has shown further improvements, and, consequently, the Corporation adjusted its decision to a flat distribution change. This adjustment means that the total dollar amount of the distribution for the 2021 fiscal year will remain the same as the 2020 fiscal year.GAZETTE: The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly altered the operating budgets for the Schools and units. How does the special assessment on endowment distributions help to cover pandemic-related costs?HOLLISTER: The financial impact of COVID-19 was sudden and significant in the spring, as it immediately adversely affected revenues and increased costs. We talked previously about the revenue impacts of rebates on room and board, canceled executive-education programs, increased financial aid, and research stoppages, and the increased costs associated with the implementation of new health protocols, including testing and tracing, new lab reconfigurations, and new and improved online course development. The Corporation decided to maintain the 3 percent special assessment on endowment distributions for the 2021 fiscal year as a means of providing funding support for the deans as they grapple with the financial dislocations during this transitional time.We have also talked about the cost-saving measures that Harvard has already implemented, such as reducing discretionary spending, instituting salary freezes, and reviewing capital spending in order to offset the economic impact of COVID-19. As we continue to look for ways to address these financial challenges, the special assessment is an effective way in which endowment fund beneficiaries across the University can help out, with some fraction of their money being used to help offset these new pandemic realities and contribute to the overall mission of sustaining excellence in teaching and research.GAZETTE: Given the improvement in the capital markets, what challenges lie ahead for the financial health of the endowment?HOLLISTER: Annual endowment distributions depend on future returns, as good returns on the endowment, from the underlying health of the capital markets, make possible healthy endowment distributions to academic programs and activities. But I should caution that we have two potential negative factors. The first is the apparent mismatch between the current high levels of the stock market with the underlying reality of a very weak economy. For example, the price to earnings ratio of corporate stocks do not support the current stock market levels, so the markets could be ready for some correction. Secondly, many experts on capital markets, including many of Harvard’s economists, are saying that the outlook for market returns is not attractive. With the low interest rates, low credit spreads, and a weak global economy, they say we are looking at lower-single-digit returns at best, which means that between these two factors we need to prepare ourselves for more than a few years of muted returns and ongoing pressure on the distribution. Remember, it was just a little over 10 years ago when the endowment lost 30 percent of its value and the distribution was cut by 20 percent over two years.last_img read more

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Coram Man Charged With Animal Cruelty

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 26-year-old man has been accused of nearly starving his dog to death after Suffolk County SPCA investigators found the canine emaciated in his Coram home.Michael Faulkner was arrested and charged with animal cruelty for not taking care of the family pet “Queenie,” an adult Cane Corso, at his Country Club Drive home.Suffolk County SPCA investigators took the dog to the Grady Animal Hospital in Sayville, where a veterinarian diagnosed the dog as being “severely emaciated” and described her as “basically a skeleton.”Arraignment information for Faulkner was not available.last_img

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7 tips to get the most out of your paycheck

first_imgIt’s a great feeling having a paycheck burning a hole in your pocket. But that sensation can quickly turn to feelings of anxiety when you’re unsure what to do with the money or you aren’t wise with your financial decisions. A solid income stream and decent financial IQ might not be enough without a good financial plan in motion; you could still be living paycheck to paycheck, a problem that 38 million Americans struggle with every day, according to research from the Brookings Institution.Whether you just started your first job or you’re a veteran in the field, there’s no better time than now to start being productive with your paycheck.1. Create a BudgetIf your paycheck is used to randomly pay for various expenses, bills and purchases, but you’re not keeping track of what’s spent where, you definitely need to create a budget. This first step can be as easy as writing down your money expenses in descending order of cost, and determining how much of your net pay should go to each without breaking the budget you’ve set up. You can use a flowchart, budgeting calculator or one of several money budgeting sites, tools and apps — like Mint.com which is very effective at automatically breaking down what you’re spending your money on, and how you can modify your financial habits. continue reading » 36SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Governor Wolf Announces the Elimination and Redevelopment of Blight in Downtown Carbondale

first_img Economy,  Infrastructure,  Jobs That Pay,  Press Release Carbondale, PA – Today, Governor Tom Wolf announced new funding for the elimination and redevelopment of multiple acres of property located in the downtown business district of Carbondale, Lackawanna County, revitalizing the community and creating approximately 25 new jobs.“Similar to other communities in the coal regions of Pennsylvania, Carbondale has worked to reinvent itself, removing blighted buildings and creating new opportunities for economic and community growth,” Governor Wolf said. “Awarding this funding to redevelop the downtown business district will contribute significantly to regrowth in both bricks-and-mortar structures and in jobs – welcome signs for the community.”The City of Carbondale was approved for a $500,000 grant for the acquisition and demolition of blighted structures, substantial site development, and the construction of two new commercial buildings, approximately 15,000 and 8,000 square feet in size. Upon completion, the project is expected to create 25 jobs and will encourage new private business investment within the city.“Anytime we can invest in rebuilding our towns and cities we’re doing the right thing,” Rep. Sid Michaels Kavulich said. “These dollars will help create jobs, preserve open spaces and encourage that small town feeling where people live, work and raise a family that America is all about. I want to thank Governor Wolf and all the local officials that worked as a team to make this happen.”“The City of Carbondale continues to be a model for how state funding and private investment can revitalize downtown areas, create jobs and generate positive economic activity,” Senator John Blake said. “This project will breathe new life into a blighted block in the heart of the city’s business district and I appreciate the governor’s continued attention to community development needs in our small cities.”As coal mining declined in the 1950s, Carbondale entered a lengthy period of economic decline that hampered local community and business investment, leading to a surplus of blighted land and buildings in the city. This project is a crucial component of Carbondale’s efforts to revitalize the community and attract business and investment to the downtown area, strengthening the economy and making Carbondale a better place to live and work.Supported through the Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program (RACP), funding will support critical expansion projects, some of which will provide opportunities for additional economic development. August 21, 2018 Governor Wolf Announces the Elimination and Redevelopment of Blight in Downtown Carbondalecenter_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Lester A. Beckman age, 95

first_imgLester A. Beckman, age 95, of Greenwood, Indiana and a former resident of Brookville, Indiana and St. Petersburg, Florida, died Monday, October 16, 2017 at his residence in Greenwood.Born March 16, 1922 in Klemmes Corner, Indiana he was the son of the late Cornelius & Katherine (Klemme) Beckman. On December 28, 1940 he and the former Thelma P. Woliung were united in marriage and she preceded him in death on March 15, 2015.He was a U.S. Army Veteran of World War II, having served with the 473RD Infantry where he earned the Purple Heart. He was retired having worked for much of his life as a machinist & farmer. He was a member of St. Peters United Church of Christ Klemmes Corner; the Disabled American Veterans, as well as the American Legion.Survivors include a daughter-in-law, Carol Beckman of Indianapolis, Indiana; four grandchildren, Nicole (Marc) Lotter, Korie (Chad) Roberts, Brian (Erin) Beckman, and Kristin (Scott Sawyer) Beckman; five great-grandchildren, as well as several nieces & nephews. In addition to his parents and wife, Thelma, he was preceded in death by his son, Eugene L. Beckman who died December 9, 1999; his sisters, Verna Beckman, Irene Baudendistel, Marie Redelman and Glenna Bauer; and brothers, Ezra Beckman and Alvin Beckman.Family & friends may visit from 10 A.M. until 11:00 A.M. on Saturday, October 21, 2017 at Phillips & Meyers Funeral Home, 1025 Franklin Ave., Brookville.Pastor Jim Elliott will conduct the Funeral Services at 11:00 A.M. on Saturday, October 21, 2017 at Phillips & Meyers Funeral Home. Burial with full military graveside honors by the Bernard Hurst Post #77 of the American Legion will follow in Maple Grove Cemetery in Brookville. Memorial contributions may be directed to St. Peters United Church of Christ Klemmes Corner or the Bernard Hurst Post #77 of the American Legion or the Disabled American Veterans. Phillips & Meyers Funeral Home is honored to serve the Beckman family, to sign the online guest book or send personal condolences please visit www.phillipsandmeyers.com .last_img read more

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Wolla, Berg are IMCA winners on record setting night at Dacotah Speedway

first_imgMANDAN, N.D. (May 22) – Records are meant to be broken.That was the case Friday as 137 drivers checked in for a regular night of racing at Dacotah Speed­way. It was a new track record for the track that boasts the highest number of IMCA Xtreme Motor Sports Modifieds in North Dakota.Jason Wolla picked up his second straight Modified victory, leading from the second lap to the checkers.Aaron Turnbull reeled in Shawn Strand for second as the frontrunners caught the tail end of the field.Lapped traffic slowed Strand as Turnbull drove by with three laps to go. Turnbull ran out of time, however, and had to settle for second.Jason Berg led the final two circuits in winning the Mach-1 Sport Compact main event. Chase Schlafmann was second and Nic West was third.Despite the record car count, the final checkered flag waved shortly 10:10 p.m., meaning just three hours and 10 minutes were needed to complete the entire show.last_img read more

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Darren Fletcher: West Brom motivated by last year’s Villa Park memories

first_img Press Association Darren Fletcher insists West Brom are on a revenge mission ahead of a return to Aston Villa for the first time since their controversial FA Cup clash. Albion lost 2-0 in the FA Cup sixth round in March which sparked a pitch invasion from Villa fans while chairs were thrown on to home supporters from the away section. But Baggies boss Tony Pulis questioned the level of stewarding at the time, fearing for his players’ safety, and Villa, who apologised for the invasion, were fined £200,000 by the Football Association. center_img It came just four days after West Brom had lost 2-1 in the Barclays Premier League at Villa Park and Fletcher, who was cup-tied for the clash, wants the Baggies to exorcise their Villa Park demons. “It was a difficult week and things happened that shouldn’t happen on football pitches,” he said. “We’ve got to use that to motivate us to help us get the result. “I’m looking forward to it. I experienced it last year and was disappointed to lose a goal in the last minute. “Then there was the cup game which I wasn’t involved in. “The passion and the atmosphere was fantastic and it’s up to us to go and meet that challenge and give our fans something to shout about.” Albion have kept three straight clean sheets but have scored just three league goals this season. Fletcher admitted they need to improve in attack. “We need to work on the balance between not conceding but also being a threat,” he said. “W e have gone from losing the goals against Chelsea and Manchester City to not conceding and we’re now looking like less of a threat going forward.” last_img read more

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Six races carded for RSTC with $3M in prize money

first_imgSIX races are on the card and over $3M in cash and trophies are up for grabs on July 9 when the Rising Sun Turf Club (RSTC), in collaboration with the Guyana Women’s Police Association, stages a one-day meet at the club’s facility, West Coast Berbice.In the feature event, horses classified `G’ and Lower will battle over one mile for the $300 000 first prize. The second-place finisher will receive $150 000, while the third-placer will earn $75 000.Other events on the day’s programme will feature `I’ Class and three-year-old Guyana-bred horses `K’ Class and Lower, `J1’ and Lower, `L’ and Lower and `L2’ and the Unclassified horses.Among the top animals already registered for the day’s programme are: Settling Star, Appling Harvest, Got to Go, T&T, Cat Messiah, Bird Man, Chelsea, Red Jet, Red Regent, Something Special, Bridal Stone Corner, Party Time, Puppy Tail, Richie Poo, Seven Dust, Little Star and Untruly.last_img
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Gallo, Choo homer as Rangers avoid sweep in San Francisco

first_img August 2, 2020 “We recognize the value of having extra bats and extra arms in the (bullpen), and that just kind of made Hamilton a tougher fit, particularly with us going down to a 28-man roster size later this week,” Kapler said. ROSTER MOVESTriggs was called up from the Alternate Training Site before the game. RHP Jandel Gustave was designated for assigment.Texas called up infielder Anderson Tejeda.QUOTABLE The Rangers entered the day last in the AL in scoring and hits before getting season-highs in both against the Giants.Texas broke the game open with a four-run seventh after San Francisco scored three in the sixth to erase a 5-2 lead.They got some help from San Francisco’s bullpen, too, when reliever Andrew Triggs (0-1) walked three consecutive batters on 14 pitches to open the seventh. After Calhoun’s sacrifice fly off Tyler Anderson made it 6-5, Gallo crushed an 0-2 pitch to right-center. Gallo also singled, doubled and walked.“To answer with runs after they put up a pretty big inning and started to get momentum on their side, you could feel as soon as we scored that four runs in the seventh that the game started to change,” Gallo said. “It was a huge boost for us.” Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditSAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Willie Calhoun hit a tiebreaking sacrifice fly after the Giants walked the bases loaded in the seventh inning, Joey Gallo followed with a three-run home run and the Texas Rangers beat San Francisco 9-5 on Sunday to avoid a three-game sweep.Shin-Soo Choo also went deep for Texas. Scott Heineman had a pair of hits including a two-run double and Jeff Mathis added an RBI single. “That’s one thing that we haven’t been able to do, we haven’t been able to capitalize and finish off some of these rallies,” Rangers manager Chris Woodward said. “We still put ourselves in a situation late in the game, too, to keep pounding at them. We could have broke that game wide open with another big hit. That’s what we want to be as an offense.” “It will get better. It will improve. I just think 2020 was meant to kind of test us all, especially right now. It’s just another test that we’re going to have to get through.” –WoodwardTRAINER’S ROOMRangers: Woodward is hopeful that 2B Rougned Odor will be available for Tuesday’s game in Oakland. Odor left Saturday’s game with tightness in the oblique area on his right side. … OF Danny Santana was placed on the 10-day injured list with a right forearm strain. Santana is 1 for 17 and has not played since Tuesday.Giants: LHP Drew Smyly was placed on the 10-day injured list with a left index finger strain. Smyly had seven strikeouts in four innings Saturday before leaving because of discomfort in the finger. UP NEXT Jonathan Hernandez (2-0) retired six batters to win.Evan Longoria and Chadwick Tromp homered for San Francisco. Tromp’s was the first of his career, Hunter Pence tripled to snap a season-opening 0 for 23 funk.“We had real good energy, particularly on the offensive side of the ball,” Giants manager Gabe Kapler said. “We’ve shown the ability to come back in a game. That’s very encouraging. We’ve shown some resilience.”Choo pulled his second home run of the season over the right field wall into McCovey Cove off Giants starter Jeff Samardzija in the fifth. On Friday the Rangers leadoff batter hit an opposite field homer on the game’s first pitch.Texas also got an encouraging outing from lefty Kolby Allard in his first start. Allard allowed one run and two hits before coming out after throwing 75 pitches in four innings.center_img Samardzija gave up five runs and seven hits in 5 2/3 innings and became the first Giants pitcher to make it through five innings, though he did have a blister on his pitching hand.“No excuses,” Samardzija said. “That’s the way it goes. You have to learn to adjust and make adjustments.”GIANTS SEND HAMILTON TO METSThe Giants traded outfielder Billy Hamilton to the Mets in exchange for right-hander Jordan Humphreys. Humphreys was immediately optioned to San Francisco’s Alternate Training Site.Hamilton signed with the Giant in the offseason but was not on the team’s opening day roster. Associated Press Gallo, Choo homer as Rangers avoid sweep in San Francisco Rangers: Texas will remain in the Bay Area and begin a three-game series at Oakland on Tuesday. LHP Lance Lynn (1-0, 0.00) starts the opener. Texas won in both of Lynn’s previous two starts this season.Giants: No starter has been announced for Monday’s game in Colorado.__More AP MLB: https://apnews.com/tag/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sportslast_img read more

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