Yonder Mountain String Band Announces 2017 Summer Tour

first_imgThe beloved five-piece Colorado jamgrass act Yonder Mountain String Band has just announced their summer tour with occasional dates featuring Tylers Childers. The recently announced dates span from mid-June to mid-July, constituting a healthy mix of festival appearances and headlining shows. The tour kicks off on June 14th with the band appearing at Telluride Bluegrass Festival. From there, Yonder will play a handful of dates across the midwest, eventually ending June with an appearance at Frendly Gathering in Londonderry, Vermont. The majority of July will see the band meander south, ending the East Coast dates of the tour in North Carolina on July 9th. To finally close out their summer appearances, Yonder will end on a high note, with performances at Oregon’s Northwest String Summit from July 13th through 16th, then return home to Colorado for a co-headlining gig of the legendary Red Rocks Amphitheatre with Gov’t Mule. You can head to Yonder’s website for tickets for their 2017 summer tour![Photo courtesy of C.B. Klein]last_img read more

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Three lies and lots of truths on campus

first_img As part of public art project, students help to animate Harvard’s iconic campus statue The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. Harvard HallThe group moves to the heart of Harvard Yard. Gilchrist points to two old red-brick buildings and shares that those were the first-year dorms of Malia Obama ’21 and Matt Damon, drawing smiles and nods. She then notes where Harvard Indian College once stood. Founded in the mid-17th century, its mission was to educate Native American youth.In front of Mass Hall, the oldest building in the Yard, Gilchrist recounts the history of the red-brick early Georgian structure, built between 1718 and 1720. Washington occupied the building with 640 soldiers in the late 1700s. It now serves as the offices for Harvard’s president, and the top floors are dorms where 12 lucky first-years live. Washington occupied the building with 640 soldiers in the late 1700s. John Harvard ‘speaks’ Related Entryways, becoming and majestic, provide security and artistry both Science Center PlazaA senior concentrating in astrophysics, Gilchrist has a soft spot for anything related to science. At Science Center Plaza, a major crossroad between Harvard Yard and the Science Center, she revels in describing the telescopes on the roof and the center’s significance for students.The Science Center is the hub of first-year academics, Gilchrist says. “Almost every single freshman takes at least one class in this building. There are five large lecture halls where a lot of introductory classes are taught, and they don’t necessarily have to do with science.”Over the course of the tour it becomes apparent why having students lead the tours is a major draw. Interest is high in what classes and campus life are like, and the tours give people a chance to chat with students about it, said Robin Parker, associate director of the visitor center.“Who better to represent Harvard University than a Harvard student?” asked Parker.When people ask Gilchrist how she feels about being a Harvard student, she is not shy about it. “I love it here,” she says. “But I also feel a strong obligation to make my Harvard degree count by using it to help others.”,People react with surprise when Gilchrist tells them the price tag of a Harvard education (about $70,000 a year) and also when she explains how financial aid works at the University.“It’s entirely need-based,” she says. “If your family makes less than $65,000 a year, Harvard will offer you a very generous package with an almost 99 percent discount, and if your family makes more than $65,000, it can still offer you a very considerable financial aid, but first you have to apply and be accepted.”If anyone asks Gilchrist any detailed admission questions, she reminds them she is doing a historical and not an admissions tour, which are handled by the Office of Admissions and include an information session. When doing private tours for high school students, Gilchrist tends to offer a little more information about the process, but she refrains from going deep.Gilchrist highlights the social clubs — the College recognizes about 400 of them — which help students put some balance in their busy lives. “I myself am in the Harvard University Band,” she says. “And we specialize in shenanigans, and occasionally play instruments.”To graduate, students must take 32 courses, one-third in their field of concentration, another third in general education, and the final third in anything they’d like to explore. “That’s the beauty of a liberal arts education,” she says. The gates that frame Harvard Yard A college, 98 feet long Though razed, the legacy of Harvard’s original library has been kept alive in Cambridge’s official seal center_img A few feet away sits Harvard Hall, Gilchrist’s favorite stop because of its rich history. First built in 1644, it rotted to the ground about a quarter of a century later. The second building was put up in 1677, but it was destined to be only be the second of three.It contained most of the College’s books, including those donated by Harvard, besides a collection of scientific instruments. “Until a cold and stormy night on Jan. 24, 1764,” says Gilchrist. “Students couldn’t check out the books; they had to be read in the library, but a student by the name of Ephraim Briggs had taken out a book, ‘The Christian Warfare Against the Devil, World and Flesh’ …“And thank goodness he did,” she says, pausing for effect, “because the building burned down that night. He returned the book, which was the only surviving book of John Harvard’s collection. The president of Harvard thanked Briggs and then expelled him … No good deed goes unpunished.” When Gore was Widener Memorial Hall and ChurchOn the outside, Memorial Hall resembles a church. Built between 1870 and 1878 to honor 136 Harvard graduates who fought for the Union and died in the Civil War, the building is an example of high Victorian Gothic architecture and is a National Historic Landmark.As Gilchrist’s group enters the building, heads tilt back as the visitors look up to admire the high, vaulted ceiling, the stained-glass windows, and the black-walnut paneling inside. The stop is one of the most popular for selfies.Memorial Hall also houses Sanders Theatre, which is used for concerts, classes, and special ceremonies, and Annenberg Hall, the first-year dining hall that can seat more than 1,000 students at a time and bears a resemblance to the Great Hall in Hogwarts Castle.“Can we take a peek at Annenberg?” is a common request.To the sightseers’ chagrin, neither the theater nor the dining hall is open to the public. “This is the moment when I have to break hearts,” says Gilchrist.“Annenberg Hall is exclusive for first-years only,” says Gilchrist. “If it makes you feel any better, I can’t go inside there myself. They are very strict about it.”,On a recent tour of high school students from India, Shobhna Aggarwal, a ninth-grader at Apeejay School, Punjab, was intrigued by Annenberg.“I’d love to see the dining hall,” Aggarwal says. “I’m a huge ‘Harry Potter’ fan. It must be amazing.”After Memorial Hall, Gilchrist leads the group to the center of the Yard. As they stand on the steps of Memorial Church, she points to the green expanse between the church and Widener Library, where Commencement Exercises take place every May.“Fun fact,” she says. “Every building in Harvard, including Memorial Church, has classrooms.”Nearly 7,000 students graduate every year, and the Yard is filled with about 20,000 folding chairs for students, their relatives, and guests. The festivities feature centuries-old traditions and notable speakers. In recent years graduates have heard from German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Harry Potter creator J.K. Rowling, and two of Harvard’s most famous dropouts, Microsoft founder Bill Gates and Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg. Both Gates and Zuckerberg received honorary degrees when they came to speak.The weather can be awful, says Gilchrist, “but it’s a once-in-a-lifetime event as a Harvard student. They give you two guest tickets as a graduate. My family right now is fighting to the death.” On a recent crisp, sunny morning, Rachel “Rae” Gilchrist waited at the Richard A. and Susan F. Smith Campus Center for the first of two tours she would lead that day. For Gilchrist, a fast talker with the gift of gab, working as a campus tour guide is the perfect job.“I like to talk to people,” says Gilchrist ’20. “I like to make them laugh and entertain them. I talk. They listen. It’s perfect.”Gilchrist is among 20 students who work at the Harvard University Visitor Center, answering questions from guests and leading the University’s official historical tours.So far this year, the center has served 34,000 visitors. The tours’ two biggest selling points? They’re free, and they’re led by Harvard students.,Gilchrist, a native of Bridgewater, Va., and the first in her family to attend college, earns extra money by working 30 hours a week as a guide on Tuesdays and Thursdays and at a computer lab on Sundays.The tour job, though, is by far her favorite, she says, not only because it pays $16 an hour but because she gets to tell people about her School.“Even if you go to Harvard for four years, you don’t necessarily know all the historical information about the University,” she says. “I don’t think I would have known the things I know if I hadn’t gotten this job.”The Gazette followed Gilchrist on a tour, and here are some of the highlights. Historic Massachusetts Hall to undergo renovation, preserving legacy Widener LibraryDirectly across from Memorial Church sits the Harry Elkins Widener Memorial Library, an imposing building whose entrance is graced with 12 Roman pillars and stands atop a 27-step granite staircase. Widener has 10 floors filled with 3.5 million books and is the largest university library in the world.Gilchrist tells the group the library’s tragic origin story. Widener, a Philadelphia businessman and book collector who graduated from Harvard in 1907, died on the Titanic in 1912.“Harry is about to board a lifeboat with his father and mother, but he realizes he had forgotten the second edition of Francis Bacon’s ‘Essais’ in his room in the Titanic and he goes back, followed by his dad,” says Gilchrist. “Neither of them is ever heard from again.”,Widener’s mother, Eleanor Elkins Widener, donated her son’s rare-book collection, including a Gutenberg Bible and a Shakespeare Folio, and $2 million to the College to build a library in honor of her son’s memory. But she set two conditions: that no stone, brick, or mortar of the outside of the building ever be changed and that a replica of Widener’s home study be situated in the center of the library.“In the center of the room, there’s his Gutenberg Bible,” Gilchrist said. “And every day, somebody turns a page of the Gutenberg Bible, and every day, somebody places fresh flowers in a vase on his desk.”Some say there was a third condition: that every incoming student pass a swim test (Widener didn’t know how to swim). But that’s a myth. Wadsworth HouseGilchrist greets a group of 35 who hail from England, Argentina, Israel, and the U.S., among other places.“Welcome to Harvard,” she says at the first stop: Wadsworth House, a 1726 Colonial that sits on Massachusetts Avenue, amid the buzz of students, buses, cars, and passersby.Built initially for the president of the College, Gilchrist tells the group, the yellow clapboard House served as headquarters for George Washington when he led the Continental Army in 1775. Many people, including a number of students, don’t know that Washington slept there. The mention of Washington’s name elicits oohs and aahs.Wadsworth, the second-oldest building in Harvard Yard, is considered the University’s “front door” and is now where the University Marshall receives foreign dignitaries and distinguished visitors.Gilchrist calls the group’s attention to a plaque on the side of the structure that commemorates Titus, Venus, Bilhah, and Juba, slaves who lived and worked in the house during the 18th century and were owned by Harvard presidents Benjamin Wadsworth and Edward Holyoke. The plaque was dedicated during Drew Faust’s tenure as University president in a special ceremony attended by U.S. Rep. John Lewis, a legendary leader of the Civil Rights Movement.“Before the plaque was added in 2016, the contributions of Titus, Venus, Bilhah, and Juba to Harvard for a long time had been erased,” Gilchrist says. “Now we can remember them. Their hard work made this University what it is.”,Before moving to the next stop, Gilchrist offers some Harvard trivia, including when it was founded (1636), by whom (Massachusetts Bay Colony), and for whom it was named (John Harvard, the School’s first benefactor).“In 1638, after John Harvard’s death, he bequeathed half his estate and all of his library and the institution was renamed after him, and that started a long-lasting trend of buildings being renamed after donors,” Gilchrist says with a grin.Winking, she asks her group to pay attention to these pieces of information because “there will be a quiz at the end …” John Harvard StatueAs the tour wraps up, Gilchrist leads the group to the last stop: the iconic namesake statue.Located in front of University Hall, the life-size bronze can’t be missed. It is often surrounded by tourists and visitors who line up to take pictures with it. Along with the Statue of Liberty and Lincoln Memorial, it’s one of the most-photographed statues in the country, says Gilchrist.Following a superstition of unknown origin, most visitors touch the figure’s feet hoping it will bring good luck. The constant rubbing, which has prevented a patina from developing, has buffed the left foot shiny.Attired as a 17th-century clergyman, the young man sits on a chair, a book balanced on his right knee, with three lines inscribed: “John Harvard. Founder. 1638.”“This statue is also known as the ‘statue of three lies,’” says Gilchrist. “Can anyone tell me what those lies are?”After a brief silence, Gilchrist reminds the group the University was founded in 1636, not 1638, and by the Massachusetts Bay Colony, not John Harvard. And the third lie?“That’s not John Harvard,” Gilchrist says, as people erupt in laughter. “That’s some guy, a particularly regal-looking guy.”All portraits of Harvard were lost in the fire of 1764. Unveiled in 1884, the model for the statue was Sherman Hoar, a Harvard student and descendant of Harvard’s fourth president, Leonard Hoar.The tour left Maria Laura Santarelli, a tourist from Argentina, with a desire to come back. After taking a picture next to the statue, she expressed a feeling common among visitors: “I wish my son could come here.”When Gilchrist announces the tour’s end, people clap enthusiastically. While they linger to take pictures, Gilchrist walks back to the Smith Center. She has to get ready for her next tour.last_img read more

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Chicago principals offer school reopening plan amid pandemic

first_imgCHICAGO (AP) — Some principals say they don’t believe Chicago Public School’s plan to reopen hundreds of schools will protect students and teachers from COVID-19 and are proposing a more gradual resumption of in-person teaching. The Chicago Principals and Administrators on Wednesday proposed initially reopening up to 100 schools and then gradually reopening more if that is a success. It warns of a lack of staff, safety supplies and guidance to safely reopen schools. The proposal comes after the teachers union voted to reject returning to schools. Mayor Lori Lightfoot says the city still plans to resume in-person K-8 learning starting Monday.last_img

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Miss Kenya USA to deliver keynote address at dinner honoring Martin Luther King Jr.

first_imgWendy Oduor, Miss Kenya USA and a Saint Mary’s alumna from the class of 2014, will present the keynote address Wednesday night at Student Diversity Board’s annual Martin Luther King Jr. event, the College announced in a media release Monday.Oduor is a motivational speaker with the mission of educating audiences on mental health issues. She will address her personal journey from Saint Mary’s to becoming Miss Kenya USA, as well as her experiences in fashion and design, according to the release.“Wendy draws inspiration from Martin Luther King Jr. to focus on making positive changes,” the release said.Oduor will discuss her mission of finding “purpose past passion,” the release said. She was inspired to share her life with audiences and advocate for mental health awareness after finding meaning in her brother’s suicide.According to Oduor’s biography on the Miss Kenya USA website, she lost her brother in 2014, the same year she graduated from the College.“Wendy eventually understood that pain can birth purpose when allowed,” the website said. “This helped Wendy to begin sharing about her experience as a guest speaker at social events and utilizing social media to create awareness and a safe space where people break their silence and are encouraged to seek professional help.”Oduor hosts weekly Mental Health Monday live sessions on Instagram, reaching more than 100 people from her account, and has made it her personal mission to increase mental health awareness in Kenya, according to the website.Oduor will speak at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday in Rice Commons.Tags: Martin Luther King Jr., mental health awareness, Miss Kenya USA, Student Diversity Board, Wendy Oduorlast_img read more

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Neil Patrick Harris Will Play Host For New Weekly Variety Show

first_img View Comments Neil Patrick Harris has an addiction to hosting. Seriously, it may be time for an intervention. The Tony and Emmy winner has been tapped to headline a U.S. version of the British variety show Saturday Night Takeaway. NBC has ordered ten-episodes of the hour-long series, which will be filmed in front of a live audience. Neither an official title nor air date has been set. Harris has expressed interest in a weekly variety show in the past, including when he was reportedly shortlisted to take over the Late Show. The former Hedwig will put on his hosting hat again to emcee the Oscars on February 22, 2015. He has hosted the Tonys four times and the Emmys twice. “Nothing like this has been done before, and its unique structure fits right into my random skill set,” said Harris, in a statement. “I can’t wait to roll up my sleeves and have some fun!” Saturday Night Takeaway premiered on ITV in 2002. The variety show features sketches, games and more and is presented by comedy duo Anthony McPartlin and Declan Donnelly, better known as Ant & Dec. Further details, including a timeline for the project, have yet to surface, but something tells us that the series will feature many gems for musical lovers.last_img read more

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In Transit Takes the Express Track to the Great White Way

first_img View Comments Related Shows In Transit Show Closed This production ended its run on April 16, 2017center_img The cast of ‘In Transit'(Photo: Emilio Madrid-Kuser) Next stop: Broadway! Performances for In Transit are set to begin on November 10 at the Circle in the Square Theatre. The tuner, which previously played at Primary Stages in 2010, follows a group of 11 New Yorkers as they navigate the streets (and tunnels) of the city. Members of the ensemble take on multiple roles, including an aspiring actress, a Wall Street honcho, a street performer, a cab driver and more. The aca-awesome cast includes Chesney Snow, Justin Guarini, Telly Leung, Steven ‘Heaven’ Cantor, Erin Mackey, Nicholas Ward, Margo Seibert, James Snyder, Mariand Torres, David Abeles, Moya Angela and Gerianne Pérez (see above); sensational stand-bys include Laurel Harris, Arbender Robinson, Aurelia Williams and Adam Bashian (see below). Frozen’s Oscar and Grammy-winning co-music writer Kristen Anderson-Lopez, vocal arranger Deke Sharon, Rick Hip-Flores, director Kathleen Marshall, Sara Wordsworth, James-Allen Ford, Russ Kaplan and David Eggers (see below) make up the creative dream team. Opening night is set for December 11, and we can’t wait to get on board!last_img read more

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Colombian Police Advise Ecuador In Fight Against Murders For Hire

first_img Jalkh added that members of the French police are also expected to visit within the next three weeks, “in order to establish dialogue about the sphere of communication and sharing of experience related to the modality of murder for hire.” Colombian intelligence police are advising the Ecuadorean authorities in the fight against murder for hire, a phenomenon associated with the rising death toll in the country, Ecuadorean interior minister Gustavo Jalkh announced Monday. He explained that the agents, who will spend several weeks in the country, “will begin their work in Guayaquil (in southwestern Ecuador),” the country’s largest city and the one most affected by this phenomenon. By Dialogo June 16, 2010 The experts on “police intelligence are in the country to share their experience related to the control and investigation of murder for hire,” the minister said in an interview with the Andes state news agency. Between January and April of this year 212 murders were recorded in Guayaquil, 64% of which were settlements of accounts among criminal gangs and 11% of which were committed by hired hitmen. The Ecuadorean government announced two weeks ago that it is setting up an elite force to combat drugs and organized crime at the national level.last_img read more

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Boomin’ in the Skies, with No Room for Errors

first_imgBy Marcos Ommati/Diálogo March 08, 2017 It is not because Karen is my cousin, but she is a warrior, really fighter!Her history is a wonderful one, and gives me hope and is one of my inspiration!Wish that she continues to grow! Impressionante e de fato extremamente inspirador a história de conquistas, e talentos, da Karen. Sendo nascida nos Estados Unidos e criada no Brasil a vida inteira, me vejo em uma posição de sonho em acreditar que vidas como a dela poem se tornar reais. Parabéns Karen por toda sua jornada que, mesmo em uma idade tão jovem, é brilhante. Tenho um orgulho imensurável de carregar o mesmo sobrenome e sangue que você. Como mulher latina que também sou, acredito um pouco mais na minha capacidade agora que descobri um pouco mais da sua. Marcos, thank you for the incredible article on my sister. You have showcased her career very brightly and we appreciate you sharing her success with the world. We have always been proud of her but this only makes it exponentially so, thank you for this amazing piece of journalism. I am indeed a proud mother of this girl. her drive and determination took her from the early age to be focus to where she wants to be.Marcos Ommati, congratulations…your article is very well written and you were able to captured perfectly the essence of this motivated, multi tasked pilot instructor…. Thanks Marcos for a such detailed story, elevating so well done the women living in a male environment and succeeding. God bless you Karen:Having known Karen since she was a baby and seeing her blossom into a wonderfully talented woman seems like a miracle, but we always knew there was something special about her. She has a rare killer combination: smart and very determined, and that’s a recipe for success.Yet she’s extremely humble and caring,We are very proud of everything she has done. Carlos A, Sanchez & Daniela Noya. WOW!!! Parabems Karen. My mom happened to find this article (not sure where) and sent it to me. She asked if I recognized the girl in the picture, and I couldn’t believe it, this is awesome! I remember well growing up together that you were always a very intelligent women, and with a very strong personality…but to be able to read about you on this article and see all the accomplishments you have achieved since the last time we saw each other MANY years ago…truly made my day. Very happy to hear you are doing well, and are making moves in life. A true inspiration. Parabéns minha amiga!!! Um forte abraço! U.S. President Barack Obama in December 2013 promoted Christine Fox to Acting Deputy Defense Secretary, the highest-ever ranking woman at the Pentagon. But despite a brilliant career, Fox may be better known to a lot of people as the inspiration for Kelly McGillis’s character Charlie Blackwood in the iconic 80s film Top Gun, in which she played a Ph.D. in astrophysics, flight instructor, and love interest to Tom Cruise’s character Maverick. Fox famously told People magazine in 1985, “I don’t know anything about flying airplanes, but I know a lot about the guy in the back seat — his mission, his radar and his missiles.” This is how many women used to think back then, meaning, they knew a lot about airplanes, but not about flying. Now, everything has changed. Meet U.S. Air Force 1st Lieutenant Karen Rubin-Santos. “Yes, I watched Top Gun, but I knew before it [the movie], [that flying] it was what I wanted to do. I always knew it. I believe the film inspired me in a sense that I did not want to be like Charlie, I mean, to know everything but never fly. I wanted to be in control of an airplane,” the pilot instructor at the U.S. Air Force Base in Columbus, Mississippi told Diálogo. Brazilian-American 1st Lt Rubin-Santos was born in Miami, Florida to Brazilian parents (Danilo and Enilda). She is first generation Brazilian-American, which she thinks is “great.” She grew up speaking Portuguese at home and learning English in school. Since it is not common for Latinas to join the military in their countries – let alone to become pilots – she says it was a shock for her family when she decided to join the Air Force Academy, “but I always knew that I wanted to serve in some way. I wanted to give back to this country.” She attended the Maritime and Science Technology Academy, commonly referred to as MAST Academy, a magnet public high school in the Virginia Key area of Miami. 1st Lt. Rubin-Santos joined the schools’ Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (JROTC), which gave her the first sense of military structure and discipline, a perfect fit for a self-proclaimed nerd. The U.S. Coast Guard-sponsored program allowed 1st Lt. Rubin-Santos to comply with all her required community service through the military service at their base in Miami Beach. “I became a part of it, and it was more of an extra class that I took in high school. Through the internships, I got a lot of military experience, and being a part of it was fantastic, even if I was just doing community service on the weekends.” However, there was something missing. “I wanted to be like my uncle [Bruno]. He was a commercial pilot for [now defunct] Varig Brazilian Airlines. He used to fly me to many places and allow me in the cockpit, where he showed me all the buttons and what they did. He even let me make announcements like, ‘Attention all, we are arriving now,’ on the plane’s PA system,” she reminisces. Upon graduation from JROTC, and in spite of being offered a soccer scholarship to attend the Coast Guard Academy, she pursued her dream of becoming an airplane pilot. “I knew that in the Coast Guard I would have to fly helicopters. I wanted to fly fixed-wing aircraft,” she says. During a visit to the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado, her mind was made. “That visit really confirmed everything I already knew. I stayed with other students at their dorms, and they told me what their lives were like. I went to class with them. The truth is, as soon as I arrived there, I thought: ‘This is it.’” An eye-opening experience The fact that only about 20 percent of students at the academy were female only made her feel more determined to fulfill her dream. “Everybody crawls through mud, wears these huge glasses… It’s not flattering, so there’s no time to think about gender discrimination. You only do what you are supposed to do, and you better excel because, in the end, only the best will advance, regardless of sex.” More than being affected by gender discrimination during her visit to the USAF Academy, 1st Lt Rubin-Santos was surprised to learn that her faith, Catholicism, is not predominant in the United States, as it had been growing up in Latin America-influenced Miami. “You could say I was much more surprised with the fact that there are so many Protestants in the United States than with the fact that I was a [gender] minority in the classroom,” she joked. “The Air Force Academy has this beautiful chapel. I remember visiting it and going right to the top, to this huge beautiful stained glass ceiling… and thinking, ‘This is so pretty. I can’t wait to pray here and go to Mass.’ The person who was giving us the tour said, ‘Oh no, this is the Protestant chapel, the Catholic one is downstairs.’ I went to the Catholic chapel, and it was much smaller but just as beautiful and it became a huge part of my personal growth while at the academy.” After graduating from the academy in 2013, 1st Lt. Rubin-Santos took a short hiatus to chill in the Caribbean and backpack through Europe. Then, she began her two-phase, 13-month pilot training program at Columbus Air Force Base in Columbus, Mississippi. During the first months of training, students learn the theory of flying, systems, about the aircraft they will pilot, how it works, and how it flies. After many hours in simulation machines, students move to the T-6, which is used as the training aircraft. In the practical training phase, students learn to land, do aerobatics, fly with instruments and, in the end, do formation, where they fly at a distance of 10 feet from another aircraft. “A pretty cool experience,” according to 1st Lt. Rubin-Santos. A very capable instructor The jump from student-pilot to instructor is not so easy. “There’s no room for error in what we do. There’s no room for second chances,” said U.S. Air Force Major Michael James Labarbera, 1st Lt. Rubin-Santos’s supervisor and chief of Standardization and Evaluations of the 37th Training Squadron, at Columbus Air Force Base. Known to him and their peers by her call sign “Boomin’”, Maj. Labarbera considers her a very capable student and pilot. “Now, [she is] also a very capable instructor. In the end, that is what is important. It is great that she is a female and can serve as an inspiration to young girls – and I say it based on my own experience because I have three daughters at home – but what really counts is that she is excellent at what she does. Actually, if I had to pick a quality to define Lt. Boomin’, it would be ‘excellence.’” A different kind of background Demonstrating excellence at school and in flying is one thing. It is another to teach, and that is when Boomin’ feels her background played a major role in her career advancement. “I’ve always been really friendly and easy to get along with, but I think the different languages I speak helps a lot,” she explained. “Here, at Columbus, we have a lot of international students, and sometimes the difficulties come not from a lack of understanding the program, but they need some motivation to feel more at home, so when I speak to them in Portuguese, or in Spanish, or in French, you can see how their semblances change completely.” Wait a minute, French?! “Well, growing up in Miami, everybody there speaks Spanish. I already had Portuguese at home and from spending my summers in Brazil. English was just natural for me because of school and my friends, so because I wanted to learn another language in high school, I chose French,” she explained. A true inspiration Boomin’s conjecture was common to the international students who spoke to Diálogo during our visit to Columbus. “It is an enormous privilege to be here, but we do feel homesick, and speaking to someone – especially an instructor – in your own language, helps tremendously to alleviate that feeling,” said Peruvian Air Force Second Lieutenant Rafael Hoyos Vásquez, who is taking the Aviation Leadership Program at the Columbus Air Force Base. “The fact that she’s a woman is an add-on value, since in my country there are no female fighter-jet pilots, for instance. I am sure instructor Boomin’ is a great inspiration for women from all countries.” Having accomplished so much at such a young age – she is only 25 – results in Boomin’ having only one more thing to look forward to in the near future. She would like to live closer to her husband, U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. David Miller, a KC-10 pilot. “Right now he’s serving at Joint-Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, in New Jersey,” says 1st Lt. Rubin-Santos with teary eyes. They hope their next assignment will be at the same base, hopefully at the Travis Air Force Base in Vacaville, California, close to Sacramento. “But I still have at least 1.5 years to go here,” she says with no regrets about her life. Finally Boomin’ Diálogo would be remiss to end this article without explaining 1st Lt. Rubin-Santos’s call sign. “It turns out that when I am in the airplane doing aerobatics, I like to surprise my students and say, ‘Boom!’ when they do something properly, or do something really well. I did not realize I said it all the time until my peers pointed it out, and from then on, I became ‘Boomin’.’ Also, my colleagues can usually tell I am in the building due to my ‘booming’ volume in the hallways,” she said with a laugh. But there is another interesting reason for the nickname. To add to 1st Lt. Rubin-Santos’s seemingly never-ending list of talents, she is also a quasi-professional singer with a “booming” voice. If you want to have a little taste of it, just pay a visit to Columbus, Mississippi, during one of the events organized at the Air Force Base. 1st Lt. Boomin’ often sings the U.S. National Anthem during such events. Diálogo was going to start this article by saying: “This is the story of a 25-year-old Latina U.S. Air Force pilot instructor who excels in everything she does, plays soccer, and is also a singer,” but who would have believed it?last_img read more

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American Red Cross holds blood drive

first_imgIf you would like to make an appointment to give blood, click here. Donors are still required to wear face masks and stations are six feet apart. “We still want to encourage people to come out and make a difference because they have the power to save up to three lives,” Guiterrez said. “If you’re thinking about ways to give back to your community, this is the perfect time and place to do it.” Patricia Egan, donor, says it doesn’t bother her to continue to donate blood. ENDICOTT (WBNG) — The Red Cross held a blood drive today at Maine-Endwell Middle School. center_img Esperanza Guiterrez, Broome County Account Manager, says the Red Cross has seen an increase of donors since starting to do antibody testing in June. “I know people who’ve given and who are scared to give,” Egan said. “It’s like really? It’s not a big deal.” For the rest of August, presenting donors receive an $18 gift certificate to the Hoffman Car Wash. last_img read more

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Shops floored

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