New Block of Tickets Available for Hamilton

first_img You too can be in the room where it happens! Broadway.com has just released a new block of tickets for Lin-Manuel Miranda’s gargantuan hit Hamilton. The Tony-winning tuner is playing to standing room only audiences at the Great White Way’s Richard Rodgers Theatre.Directed by Thomas Kail and featuring a book, music and lyrics by Miranda, Hamilton is inspired by the book Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow. The new musical follows the scrappy young immigrant who forever changed America, from bastard orphan to Washington’s right hand man, rebel to war hero, loving husband caught in the country’s first sex scandal to Treasury head who made an untrusting world believe in the American economy. George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Eliza Hamilton and lifelong Hamilton friend and foe, Aaron Burr, all make appearances in the tuner about America’s fiery past.Hamilton currently stars Miranda in the title role, with the cast also including Rory O’Malley as King George III, Christopher Jackson as George Washington, Leslie Odom Jr. as Aaron Burr, Phillipa Soo as Eliza Hamilton, Anthony Ramos as John Laurens/Phillip Hamilton, Daveed Diggs as Marquis De Lafayette/Thomas Jefferson, Renée Elise Goldsberry as Angelica Schuyler and Javier Muñoz as Hamilton alternate. Daveed Diggs, Okieriete Onaodowan, Anthony Ramos & Lin-Manuel Miranda in ‘Hamilton'(Photo: Joan Marcus) View Comments Hamiltoncenter_img from $149.00 Related Showslast_img read more

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William Popp to Replace Nick Cordero in Waitress

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 5, 2020 Waitress William Popp Delicious! William Popp will make his Broadway debut when he takes over the role of Earl in Waitress on September 23. He steps in for the A Bronx Tale-bound Nick Cordero in the Tony-nominated tuner. Headlined by Tony winner Jessie Mueller, the Diane Paulus-helmed musical is baking up a storm at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre.Star of off-Broadway’s Sleep No More, Popp’s TV credits include Power, Person of Interest, Blue Bloods, Blacklist, The Americans and the upcoming Time After Time.Waitress marks five-time Grammy nominee Sara Bareilles’ stage-writing debut. Based on the 2007 film by the late Adrienne Shelly and book by Jessie Nelson, the tuner follows Jenna, a small town waitress stuck in a loveless marriage. As a nearby baking contest approaches (and a new doctor comes to town), she’s torn between her commitments and—thanks to her pie-making expertise—a chance at freedom.The cast also includes Drew Gehling, Keala Settle, Jenna Ushkowitz, Dakin Matthews, Eric Anderson, Christopher Fitzgerald, Thay Floyd, Molly Hager, Aisha Jackson, Ragan Pharris and Ryan Vasquez.center_img Related Shows View Commentslast_img read more

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The Bodyguard Star Ben Richards on Not Singing in a Musical & Why He Likes Being a Replacement

first_img Ben Richards is a major TV name in Britain who has distinguished himself across a range of musicals, including Grease and Guys and Dolls to The Full Monty and Priscilla, Queen of the Desert. He can currently be seen at the Dominion Theatre opposite star Beverley Knight in a fresh run of The Bodyguard, the stage version of the iconic 1992 film that starred Kevin Costner in the title role of Whitney Houston’s minder. The delightful Richards took time one recent afternoon to chat about takeovers and conquering the Big C in an honest and wide-ranging interview. You’re the latest in a strong line of actors to play the title role in The Bodyguard on stage: what has that been like?What’s interesting is that I accepted [the part of] Frank on the strength of the script and what I had heard, which is probably a bit of a gamble. Otherwise, there can be that element of watching someone’s performance and then you try and copy it, whereas I try to inhabit the role without any outside influences.Frank Farmer is an unusual part for a musical theater performer given that he has next to nothing to sing.Yes, and when you do hear him sing, it’s very badly in the karaoke scene! In some ways what’s weird about The Bodyguard is that for most of the characters it’s like a play. It’s when you have the concert numbers, with Beverley as Rachel Marron, that it becomes a musical.So you don’t have to worry about your voice?It’s so nice not to have to do that. The thing with Frank is that the part is about being grounded; he’s the anchor of the piece. It’s important, too, in a show about an entertainer that Frank isn’t Mr. Showbiz. He looks after big people, and he’s prepared to take a bullet on the job. You make the interesting point that the 1992 Kevin Costner film doesn’t at first glance suggest itself as a stage musical.Not the way that, say, when you see Moulin Rouge, you think, “I can see how they would put it on stage.” But what’s really clever about the way [director] Thea Sharrock has done this is that the set is like an iris: it moves in and out and helps direct your eyes to where she wants you to watch. So in a way it manages to be theatrical and cinematic at the same time.Do you think attracts people who don’t necessarily go to musicals?Or theater shows of any sort, much like when I did Rock of Ages. These sorts of shows encourage people who don’t normally have a night at the theater because, at least in the case of The Bodyguard, everyone knows the songs. I saw the movie when I first started going to the cinema and have been singing and dancing along to Whitney Houston ever since. Do you relate to the world of the show—that’s to say, of intense celebrity and the need for bodyguards that goes with that? Well, the first thing to say is that Bev [Knight] understands it completely as a recording artist and star and knows what it’s like, at least to a certain level. And though she herself doesn’t live like that, she knows the terrain. I’ve found for my part that I’m not very interested in the media circus where you end up going to the opening of an envelope. I’d much rather be around friends and do normal stuff or be here in the country [in Hertfordshire, north of London] with my family. That’s what keeps me sane. You’re no stranger to takeovers.It’s nice when  you get to experience all the research and the fun stuff. But, honestly, if you’re doing interesting work and playing interesting characters, I’m just happy to be working—and in a good productionThe result has allowed you a broad range of parts.That’s the intention. I want to be as chameleon-like as I can be, whether that means playing a gay drag queen in Priscilla or a 1980s misogynistic boss [on tour] in 9 to 5 or a shaven-headed thug in Oliver! or a rock god in Rock of Ages. What’s good is when the work keeps changing: the goal with each project is to switch it up.You’ve been very candid about having had bowel cancer and subsequently became an ambassador for Bowel Cancer UK. By the time 9 to 5 came along, I had finished treatment and knew I could do [the show], so they were, like, “OK, we trust you to do your thing.”  It’s been four years now since the diagnosis, and I feel fantastic; a fifth year in the clear will be the big marker. This must give you a new and considered perspective on life.Very much so, and I’m always aware that things could have gone the other way. You learn for one thing to take less for granted. But I find more than ever that I like where I am going and I’m very happy. We’re scheduled to do The Bodyguard in Toronto in the first half of next year, for instance, and I’m incredibly excited about that. I’ll get to do my American accent in North America.That should be cool. And what about once you’re back in the U.K.? Well, there’s certainly a big buzz about this Hamilton show, but I don’t know if there are any white guys in it. Ben Richards & Mickell Stewart-Grimes in ‘The Bodyguard’ (Photo: Alessandro Pinna) View Commentslast_img read more

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In Transit Takes the Express Track to the Great White Way

first_img View Comments Related Shows In Transit Show Closed This production ended its run on April 16, 2017center_img The cast of ‘In Transit'(Photo: Emilio Madrid-Kuser) Next stop: Broadway! Performances for In Transit are set to begin on November 10 at the Circle in the Square Theatre. The tuner, which previously played at Primary Stages in 2010, follows a group of 11 New Yorkers as they navigate the streets (and tunnels) of the city. Members of the ensemble take on multiple roles, including an aspiring actress, a Wall Street honcho, a street performer, a cab driver and more. The aca-awesome cast includes Chesney Snow, Justin Guarini, Telly Leung, Steven ‘Heaven’ Cantor, Erin Mackey, Nicholas Ward, Margo Seibert, James Snyder, Mariand Torres, David Abeles, Moya Angela and Gerianne Pérez (see above); sensational stand-bys include Laurel Harris, Arbender Robinson, Aurelia Williams and Adam Bashian (see below). Frozen’s Oscar and Grammy-winning co-music writer Kristen Anderson-Lopez, vocal arranger Deke Sharon, Rick Hip-Flores, director Kathleen Marshall, Sara Wordsworth, James-Allen Ford, Russ Kaplan and David Eggers (see below) make up the creative dream team. Opening night is set for December 11, and we can’t wait to get on board!last_img read more

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Odds & Ends: Adele Wants to Star on Broadway & More

first_imgAdele(Photo: Jason Merritt/Getty Images) Javier Muñoz Star Files View Comments Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today. Adele Wants to Star on BroadwayThis is music to our ears…Adele would love to be on the Great White Way! According to Vanity Fair, the Grammy winner has her heart set on playing the role of Mama Rose in Gypsy. However, the songstress added, “like when I’m 50,” so Barbra Streisand has nothing to fear from a competing project for the next two decades. Perhaps in the meantime, Adele, you could get to work on penning that Main Stem musical instead? Hello, can you hear us?Javier Muñoz Tapped for QuanticoJavier Muñoz, who is currently headlining Broadway’s Hamilton, is set to appear in an episode of ABC’s Quantico. TVLine reveals that he will play Gabriel Carrera, vice consul at a D.C. consulate, in the drama. The man is non-stop!Ars Nova/Comet Dispute UpdateAnother twist in the dispute between Ars Nova and The Great Comet’s commercial producers. The New York Times reports that the three lead producers of the musical, Howard and Janet Kagan and Paula Marie Black, have offered to agree to Ars Nova’s demands over billing, if the nonprofit lets go of two legal claims it recently filed. We will keep you posted!Pasek & Paul Tapped for Snow White RemakeAnd the next live-action movie musical in development over at Disney is…Snow White! Broadway favorites Benj Pasek and Justin Paul (Dear Evan Hansen, La La Land) have been enlisted to pen new songs for the project, which will be produced by Marc Platt (Wicked, Grease: Live), writes Variety. Other films on the horizon from the mouse house include The Lion King, The Little Mermaid, Aladdin and Oliver Twist. The Emma Watson-led Beauty and the Beast is slated to hit movie theaters on March 17, 2017.Tuck Everlasting Scribe Natalie Babbitt Dead at 84Natalie Babbitt, who wrote the 1975 children’s novel Tuck Everlasting, which was adapted into a musical that played Broadway this past spring, has died at the age of 84. According to the Associated Press, the cause of death was cancer.Steve Martin & Edie Brickell Set for Bright Star ConcertThe original company of Bright Star, including Carmen Cusack and Paul Alexander Nolan, will reunite for a one-night-only concert to celebrate the original cast recording alongside co-creators Steve Martin and Edie Brickell. The event is scheduled to take place at Town Hall on December 12.P.S. The London production of Jason Robert Brown’s The Last Five Years, starring Samantha Barks and Jonathan Bailey, has extended by a week and will now play through December 3 at the St. James Theatre.last_img read more

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Stephen Carlile to Make Broadway Debut in The Lion King

first_img from $75.00 Related Shows View Comments Stephen Carlile begins performances as Scar in The Lion King on January 31. This marks the actor’s Broadway debut; he originated the role on the U.K. tour.Carlile appeared in the West End productions of The Go-Between, The Producers, Phantom of the Opera and Snoopy! His U.K. regional credits include My Fair Lady, Twelfth Night, By Jeeves, Don Giovanni and Over My Shoulder. On screen, he has appeared in Brideshead Revisited and Bright Young Things.The Lion King also includes Jelani Remy as Simba, L. Steven Taylor as Mufasa, Adrienne Walker as Nala and Tshidi Manye as Rafiki. Stephen Carlile(Photo: Disney)center_img The Lion King Star Files Stephen Carlilelast_img read more

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Conservation-Use Tables

first_imgFarmers, foresters, county government officials and tree harvesters involved with theConservation-Use Land Valuation Program should keep an eye on the calendar.The 1996 conservation-use (current-use) valuation tables for land have been completedby the Georgia Department of Revenue and mailed to county tax assessors to becomeeffective Jan. 29.The county tax assessor must have sign-ups before the property tax return filingdeadline (March 1 or April 1, depending on the county).Each year the DOR revises its tables of values for qualifying conservation-useproperty, following guidelines detailed by House Bill 283 (1992-style) and H.B. 66(1993-style).Details of the programs are available in a University of Georgia Extension Servicepublication entitled “Tax Incentives for the Georgia Landowner.” The countyExtension office has Bulletin 1089 for $1 per copy.The publication discusses the ’91 timber tax law, the ad valorem tax issues of the newconservation-use valuation program, the one-time county ad valorem tax on timber atharvest or sale for harvest, and the issues of fair market value and the agriculturalpreferential program.Covenants are between qualified landowners and county governments. The purpose of thecovenants is to have qualified agricultural and forest lands in Georgia valued for countyad valorem taxes based on current conservation use.The fair market value is the approach normally used.”The benefit of conservation-use valuation to the Georgia public is that land ispreserved in farms and forests,” says Coleman Dangerfield, an Extension Serviceagricultural economist.”The result is increased open and green areas for all to enjoy,” Dangerfieldsays. “In return for a covenant with the county, the landowner agrees to maintain theland in its agricultural or forest use for 10 years.”For qualified landowners, the program offers land value that reflects farm and forestuses, Dangerfield says. Current-use valuation may result in a lower county ad valoremproperty tax bill.The county Extension office has two maps and tables available in the January”Forest Resource Notes” newsletter that give the conservation-use land values.The county tax assessor also has maps, tables, program details and sign-up procedures.One map shows the nine Conservation-Use Valuation Areas by county with a tablecontaining values to be used for all 1993-style covenants. The second map shows the 28CUVAs by county with a table containing values to be used for the 13,376 1992-stylecovenants.Tables show the dollars-per-acre values for class 1-9 land, with 1 being mostproductive and 9 being least productive land.In 1990, the Georgia General Assembly passed House Resolution 836. The resolutionproposed a constitutional amendment to allow, among other things, the revision of taxationof agricultural and forest land.Following approval of Constitutional Amendment No. 3, H.B. 283 became law in 1991. H.B.283 provided the means for qualifying and valuing agricultural, forested andenvironmentally sensitive land (conservation-use property) under a current-use concept forthe 1992 tax year.In 1993, H.B. 66, a technical corrections and clarification bill, was signed by theGovernor. H.B. 66 allowed for improved means to qualify and value conservation-useproperty for the 1993 tax year and beyond.last_img read more

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Agricultural drought

first_imgBy David Emory StooksburyUniversity ofGeorgiaAs Geogia enters the heart of the growing season, mildagricultural drought conditions have returned to much of northand central Georgia. The remainder of the state is abnormally dry.Mild drought conditions exist primarily south of a PolkCounty-to-Stephens County line and north of a Quitman-to-LincolnCounty line. Most of the remainder of the state is quicklyapproaching mild agricultural drought conditions.Soil moisture levels in southeast Georgia are near normal formid-June.Tropical weather system Alberto is bringing some moisture reliefto south Georgia on Tuesday. Until the final track and timing ofAlberto is known, though, the impact on the moisture supply inGeorgia won’t not be known.High water use by plants and high evaporation rates associatedwith temperatures in the mid to upper 90s have caused soilsstatewide to become very dry.Hot cropsThe immediate agricultural concerns are with corn and pastureconditions. Corn has started to pollinate across the state. Hotand dry conditions during pollination cause major reductions incorn yields. Pasture production is also being negativelyaffected. This impact will hurt livestock and dairy operationsand could linger into the winter.Rainfall during the cool season, October through March, was lowacross most of the state. Because of the dry cool season, thesoil moisture was not adequately recharged to provide a bufferfor a period of little rain and high temperatures.During the past 30 days, the following University of Georgiaautomated weather stations are among the 28 receiving less than 1inch of rain: Alpharetta, Arlington, Brunswick, Pine Mountain,Camilla, Cordele, Covington, Dawson, Duluth, Eatonton, FortValley, Gainesville, Griffin, Statesboro, Valdosta, Vidalia andWatkinsville.Low streamsU.S. Geological Survey stream gauges are showing low flows acrossthe entire state. Many streams are near the 10th percentile forthe date.At the 10th percentile, we expect the stream flow to be greaterthan the current value in 90 years out of 100 for the currentdate.Based on USGS data, groundwater levels were showing good rechargein November and December 2005. However, with abnormal drynessduring the late winter and early spring, groundwater levels werebeginning to drop by mid-April. By June, levels were below normalstatewide and still dropping.The normal recharge season for groundwater is over. So levels areexpected to keep dropping through summer into fall.The state’s major reservoirs are in good shape now. However,water levels are starting to drop. Farm ponds are showing theimpacts of the dry, hot weather.WateringGeorgia is now under the normal odd-even outdoor water useschedule. Odd-numbered addresses may water only on Tuesdays,Thursdays and Sundays. Even-numbered and unnumbered addresses maywater only on Mondays, Wednesdays and Saturdays. There are nohour limits.Local governments and water providers are authorized to implementmore stringent outdoor water use schedules within theirjurisdictions. Some water providers, especially around Atlanta,are starting to implement more stringent outdoor water userequirements.Comprehensive updated information may be found at www.georgiadrought.org.Real-time weather conditions, including soil moisture balance,may be found at www.georgiaweather.net.(David Stooksbury is the state climatologist and a professorof engineering and atmospheric sciences in the University ofGeorgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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Free computers

first_imgBy Tess HammockGeorgia 4-H’s Need a Computer program made 34 lucky students’ holidays brighter by awarding each of them a free personal computer. The philanthropic program began 11 years ago as a 4-H project for Rachel McCarthy, then a Walton County 4-H’er. She and her father, Jim, received donated computers, refurbished them and gave the computers to 4-H’ers in Walton County. After Rachel graduated from high school, her sister, Amanda, began to head up the Need a Computer program. In 2003, the state 4-H Youth Technology Team picked up the program and has since awarded more than 500 computers to needy 4-H’ers across the state. The team accepts computer donations all year and refurbishes them in the fall. This includes loading them with licensed software programs, cleaning, restoring hard drives and testing each computer and monitor to ensure the computers are in tip-top shape. “Most of the computers are two or three years old,” said Cheryl Varnadoe. “We don’t accept older computers because we want to give the students computers that will be capable of running current programs and the Internet.” Varnadoe is a UGA Extension 4-H specialist and the YTT state coordinator. This year, applications were received from 50 fifth through 12th grade students and 34 computers were awarded. Applicants must write an essay about why they want and need a computer and submit letters of reference from teachers and community leaders.The winning 4-H’ers’ reasons for needing a computer are varied.In Coweta County, Makayla Denise Herndon wanted a computer for her mother. “My mom is a single parent who does her best to get us to the library or print off information when she is at work,” she said “This computer would take a lot of pressure off of her.” Brittany Veal in Ben Hill County hopes having a computer of her own will help her grades. “Having my own computer will be like having a tutor at home with me, and I won’t have to have others laugh at me if I make a mistake,” she said.A computer will help Dy’Amond McGhee of Bryan County save time and money. “I write my research paper on notebook paper at home and I go to the library to type and print the research paper because I don’t have a printer. And I have to pay 10 cents a page!” Tyler Haymans of Walton County hopes his new computer will help him control his autism. “I have PDD-NOS. That is a form of autism. I don’t get as upset and frustrated typing as I do writing,” he said.Wilkinson County 4-H’er Corey Spann plans to use his computer to practice for tests. “I am already behind one grade in school, but I want to do better. If I get a computer, I can practice for the CRCT because I have to pass it to go to the next grade,” he said.For information on donating a computer or applying for the 2012 program, visit www.georgia4h.org/public/edops/techteam/Need-A-Computer/default.htm.Tess Hammock is a student writer with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.last_img read more

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Keep Local Farms’ program launched in Richmond, Vermont

first_imgYesterday, New England state agriculture leaders joined forces with dairy promotion organizations to launch the Keep Local Farms program. Inspired by the Fair Trade concept, Keep Local Farms will help to get more money directly to dairy farmers while creating stronger connections between farmers and their customers.  The program is an effort to ensure dairy farmers in the Northeast are paid a sustainable price for their milk and to provide consumers with a way to support local dairy farmers, their community and the local economy. The Keep Local Farms program is a creative and innovative approach to help our struggling dairy farmers in a very difficult economic environment. Vermonters are committed to helping preserve our dairy heritage and this program is one way we all can contribute.  I look forward to the seeing the Keep Local Farms program succeed, said Governor Douglas.The Problem:Dairy farmers all across the Northeast and the nation are struggling to survive due to the low prices they are paid for their milk and the high cost to produce milk. Most consumers are not aware that a dairy farmer currently gets about .97 cents per gallon of milk while it costs about $1.80 to produce. This is not sustainable and threatens to undermine the dairy industry in the Northeast.  Our dairy farmers are the backbone of agriculture in Vermont. They are stewards of the land and contribute significantly to our economy and way of life, said Roger Allbee, Vermont Secretary of Agriculture. There is not a dairy farmer in the state who has not been impacted by this crisis and while not a silver bullet, Keep Local Farms is a way for people to support this important industry and help dairy farmers get a more equitable price for their product.What s at Stake:The dairy industry in New England has a significant economic impact on the region. The milk produced on these farms is valued at $12.2 billion, and creates over $5 billion in economic activity.  There are approximately 1880 farms in New England and 99 percent of them are small, with fewer than 100 cows per farm. Nonetheless, they provide upwards of 22,000 jobs in the dairy industry, including farming, farm supply businesses, milk haulers, processors, marketers, farm service firms and agencies. With the current issues affecting dairy farmers it is important to launch this program now to build the fund to assist dairy farmers and keep working toward the ultimate goal of co-branding, stated Roger Allbee, Secretary of Agriculture and Chair of the Vermont Dairy Promotion Council. Consumers Vote with Their Dollars:Consumers play an essential role in the Keep Local Farms program and the future viability of dairy farmers in the region.  In addition to purchasing nutrient-rich dairy products at the store, Keep Local Farms allows consumers to contribute directly to dairy farmers through the Keep Local Farms website (KeepLocalFarms.org) and in the future, through co-branded dairy products.By contributing to a fund that will be shared with farmers of the Northeast, consumers can help guarantee a fair wage for dairy farmers and support the fresh, local food network they help to sustain.   We encourage consumers to purchase and enjoy nutritious, high quality and dairy products from our New England dairy farms, stated Darryl Williams, Dairy Farmer and board member of the New England Family Dairy Farm Cooperative, And if consumers would like to do more to support dairy farmers the Keep Local Farms program helps them do that.The Keep Local Farms program will grow through partnerships with retailers, organizations, colleges/universities and businesses that share the core values of support for local farms, community, economy and you the consumer.  These are partners who value farms, local foods and sustainable business practices. For more information on the Keep Local Farms program please visit keeplocalfarms.org or call 877-388-7381. Keep Local Farms is a partnership between the Vermont Dairy Promotion Council, the New England Family Dairy Farm Cooperative with Cooperative Development Institute, and the New England Dairy Promotion Board.Source: VT Agency of Agriculture. Richmond, Vermont September 14, 2009last_img read more

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