Vermont Field House becomes first net-zero energy secondary school building in nation

first_imgThe Putney School, a college preparatory boarding high school in southern Vermont, cut the ribbon Saturday on its 16,800 square foot net-zero energy field house that will produce as much energy as it uses over the course of a year.There are only a handful of net-zero energy buildings in the United States—The Putney School Field House is the nation’s first net-zero energy secondary school building and Vermont’s first commercial net-zero energy building. Of the project’s $6 million budget, $5.1 million was spent on building construction.“We want to show the world that net-zero energy technology for public buildings exists right now,” says Putney School Director Emily Jones. “It’s time to move net-zero energy buildings from the theoretical realm into reality.”By definition, net-zero energy buildings generate as much energy as they consume over the course of a year. The energy used is usually produced on-site and comes from renewable energy sources such as wind, solar, geothermal, or biomass. These buildings are designed to minimize the use of natural resources and energy. According to Architect Bill Maclay, whose firm designed The Putney School Field House, such buildings not only protect the environment by minimizing energy use and reducing the need for outside (fossil fuel- based) energy sources, they pay for themselves through improved efficiency and lower operating costs and help avoid the risks associated with fuel price volatility. Over the course of a year, the total energy bill will be zero.“There are only a handful of net-zero energy buildings in the nation,” says Bill Maclay, president and founder of Maclay Architects. “Our hope is that this will be one of the first of many such buildings. This will show the world that our buildings can—and should—be built to meet much stronger energy standards to not only protect the environment but also to improve an organization’s bottom line.”The super-insulated, super-energy-efficient building will use the sun for its heating (including passive solar) and electricity needs. Sixteen sun-tracking photovoltaic solar panels will power the building and, in an average year, will enable the building to do better than break even on its energy use. During the winter months the building will draw electricity from the grid. During sunny months, the photovoltaic cells will feed excess energy back into the grid. According to Project Architect Bill Gallup, in addition to paying no energy bill, The Putney School will actually receive 6 cents per kilowatt-hour for electricity fed back (net-metered) into the grid.“This spacious building will be both a snapshot of sustainable building technology at this point in history and an educational tool for other schools whose curricula include sustainability,” says Putney School CFO Randy Smith.The Putney School will have real-time energy monitoring data available to the public on their website when the building is certified for occupancy in November 2009.In addition to being the first net-zero energy secondary school building in the nation, the design team anticipates that The Putney School Field House will be one of only five platinum (the highest possible rating) LEED-certified school buildings in the country. LEED, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, is the nationally-accepted standard and rating system for high performance (green) buildings developed by the U.S. Green Building Council.For more information, visit: www.putneyfieldhouse.org(link is external).About The Putney School:The Putney School is a boarding and day high school in southeastern Vermont situated on a 500-acre working dairy farm run by the students, in addition to a normal class day. Founded by Carmelita Hinton in 1935, The Putney School remains dedicated to progressive education as a better way of preparing young men and women for college and a sustainable future. For more information on The Putney School or Putney School Summer Programs, visit www.putneyschool.org(link is external).About Maclay Architects:Founded in 1982, Maclay Architects is a Vermont-based architectural firm specializing in innovative, sustainable design for individuals, businesses and organizations seeking to create vibrant places for life, work and play. Firm founder and president, William Maclay, has worked in sustainable design since 1971, bringing his lifelong passion for the environment into his work through the design and creation of beautiful, sustainable buildings. Through its team of LEED-accredited professionals, the firm offers a full-range of architectural services for all phases of residential, commercial and institutional projects. For more information, visit www.maclayarchitects.com(link is external). Source: The Putney School, Vermont.# # #last_img read more

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Vermont participates in financial fluency pilot project

first_imgFour Vermont public schools will join more than a dozen schools located throughout New England to test a new financial fluency program that teaches financial concepts within a math-based curriculum. The aim is to help educators develop new approaches to offering students instruction in personal finance.Teachers at Bellows Falls Union High School, St. Albans City School, Twinfield Union High School and U32 High School started testing a six-lesson curriculum in late April. The lessons focus on budgeting, including ratios and proportions, and the power of compounding interest as applied to credit cards and investments. Case studies in the final lessons challenge students to apply what they have learned to individuals in financial trouble or who have poor personal finance habits.‘While schools recognize the value of this subject area, it is challenging to find a place in the curriculum that will reach all students,’ said State Treasurer Beth Pearce. ‘This pilot project tests teaching these concepts through math’a subject students are already taking. It is hoped that the results of this pilot will give educators useful information in their continued evaluation of effective approaches to teaching personal finance.’The financial fluency pilot project is a joint effort of the non-profit Valmo Villages and its leader Valerie Mosley and an economics education team from the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. Testing of the curriculum in Vermont began the week of April 25 and will continue through early May. A student pre- and post- test will help educators gauge the effectiveness of the curriculum and explore ways to improve teaching approaches.St. Albans City School math teacher John Cioffi is coordinating the pilot project with three teams of teachers working with approximately 160 seventh and eighth grade students. The lessons are being offered as part of their grade-level math instruction.‘I have seen the passing attempts at educating our students on financial matters. Generally, the attempts are vague and do not stick with the students,’ explained Cioffi. ‘This program provides the opportunity to integrate the mathematical knowledge of linear and non-linear relationships with the life skills of managing money. The case study approach matches the style of my learning community.’At Bellows Falls Union High School, math teacher Susan Swan will present the lessons to students enrolled in math applications and in AP calculus. U32 High School will test the curriculum in their ‘Money Matters’ course. Math teacher Kit Walker said her students are especially responding to the case studies where they must come up with practical ideas to help the fictional characters solve his or her financial dilemmas.Math teacher Charlie Wanzer of Twinfield Union High School is introducing the material to students enrolled in a class called ‘post- high school math.’‘In this day and age it is important that students be knowledgeable about the financial forces that will impact them when they graduate. Be it student loans or credit cards, students will find that financial realities can be harsh and they must be prepared to handle them,’ said Wanzer.Following the pilot test, developers will evaluate the results from all of the schools across New England. Plans are to continue to refine the curriculum and offer the financial fluency lesson plans to states outside of the New England area.‘We recognize the strong contributions of our Vermont school partners in helping to create a new national model for financial education in our schools,’ said Valerie Mosley, who was inspired to create the program two years ago. ‘Once students understand the math behind how money, investing and financial decisions work, it engages students, makes math relevant, and prepares our young for a bright, financially sound future.’The curriculum is grouped as follows: lesson one ‘ budgeting and saving; lesson two ‘ compounding interest; lesson three ‘ credit cards; lesson four ‘ investing; lessons five and six ‘ interactive case studies.‘While both parents and teachers agree that personal money management is something that we should be teaching our children, how best to do this remains a challenge,’ said Lisa Helme, director of financial literacy and communications for the State Treasurer’s Office. ‘Parents need support in talking to their kids about money, especially as our financial system becomes more complex. Teachers recognize the importance of the subject, but question where, in an already crowded curriculum, can this subject be taught. The results of the pilot will demonstrate whether this is an effective way of reaching every student.’Additional collaborators in the financial fluency project include the Center for Mathematics and Quantitative Education at Dartmouth College, EdTech Leaders Online, Mathematics for All, Leadership Teachers & the Center for Real World Education and the American Life Panel at the Rand Corporation.last_img read more

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Ledyard Financial Group reports Q3 results

first_imgTotal Risk Based Capital Ratio $0.31 $1.88Dividends Per Common Share $0.31 38,024,589 9/30/2010 203,832,466 126,107,548 $3,285,346 $3,681,651 $35.49 $395,587,820 $0.56 16.93% $0.62 2,277,068Net Interest Income 3.02% Non-performing Assets as a % of Total Assets 8,640,085 9,053,941Provision for Loan Losses 575,000 632,276 For the Three Months Ended 9/30/2011 2,063,173 $379,199,577 FHLB Advances & Other Borrowings 3,900,322 9/30/2010Total Interest Income 450,000Non-interest Income HANOVER, N.H.–(BUSINESS WIRE)– 11.1.11 11,824,960Net Income As of 09/30/2011 202,068,471 Ledyard National Bank,Ledyard Financial Group, Inc. (ticker symbol LFGP), the holding company for Ledyard National Bank, today reported its financial results for the third quarter of 2011. Net income for the quarter ended September 30, 2011, was $576,597, or $0.56 per share compared to $632,276 or $0.62 per share for the same period in 2010, a decrease of $55,679 or 8.81%. Net income for the nine months ended September 30, 2011, was $1,918,738, or $1.86 per share compared to $1,927,036, or $1.88 per share for the same period in 2010, a decrease of $8,297. The Company continues to be impacted by a slowdown in lending activity due to general economic conditions. In addition, the third quarter results in 2011 were impacted by an addition to the allowance for loan losses (’Allowance’), increased expenses associated with non-performing loans, and the charge off noted below relating to a single loan taken this quarter.Our total revenue for the quarter ended September 30, 2011, was $4,864,857, compared to $4,940,398 for the same period in 2010. Total revenue for the nine months ended September 30, 2011, was $15,344,526 compared to $14,879,645, an increase of $464,881 or 3.12%. Net interest income for the quarter ended September 30, 2011, was $2,801,685, compared to $2,953,522 for the same period in 2010, for a decrease of $151,837 or 5.14%. Net interest income for the nine months ended September 30, 2011, was $8,640,085 compared to $9,053,941 for the same period in 2010, for a decrease of $413,856 or 4.57%. The primary factors contributing to the decrease in net interest income have been the slowdown in loan demand and the low level of interest rates.For the quarter ended September 30, 2011, $150,000 was added to the Allowance compared to $150,000 for the same period in 2010. For the nine months ended September 30, 2011, $575,000 was added to the Allowance compared to $450,000 for the same period in 2010. Net charge-offs for the nine months ending September 30, 2001 were $1,286,670, compared to $495,830 for the comparable period in 2010. The total Allowance was $5.6 million at September 30, 2011, compared to $6.3 million for the same period in 2010. Total non-performing assets were $5 million at September 30, 2011, compared to $5.9 million for the same period in 2010. During the third quarter of 2011 $400,000 from an individual loan was charged-off (bringing the total charge offs for this loan to $1.2 million for the year] and is included in the net charge-off totals for 2011.Ledyard Financial Advisors, a division of Ledyard National Bank, reported revenue for the quarter ended September 30, 2011, of $1,706,978, compared to $1,512,365 for the same period in 2010, an increase of $194,613 or 12.87%. Revenue for the nine months ended September 30, 2011 was $5,134,355, compared to $4,500,138 for the same period in 2010, for an increase of $634,217 or 14.09%. Assets under management and custody at Ledyard Financial Advisors totaled $838 million as of quarter end, an increase of $25 million over the prior year.Non-interest expense for the quarter ended September 30, 2011, was $3,935,360, compared to $3,900,322 for the same period in 2010, for an increase of $35,038 or .90%. Non-interest expense for the nine months ended September 30, 2011, was $12,169,588 compared to $11,824,960 for the same period in 2010, for an increase of $344,628 or 2.91%. The majority of the increase was due to increases in salary and employee benefits in addition to increased expenses associated with the problem loan noted above. Increased staffing expense is due to additions to staff at Ledyard Financial Advisors, as we continue to invest in our core businesses. Increased health care costs contributed to the increase in employee benefits.At September 30, 2011, the Company’s shareholders’ equity stood at $36.6 million, compared to $34.8 million for the same period in 2010. All of the Company’s capital ratios are well in excess of the amount required by the Federal Reserve for a bank holding company to be considered ‘well capitalized.’ At September 30, 2011, the Company’s book value per share stood at $35.49 compared to $33.92 for the same period in 2010.Loans, net of the allowance for loan losses at September 30, 2011, were $203.8 million, compared to $202.1 for the same period last year. Total deposits at September 30, 2011 were $302.4 million, a decrease of $7.5 million from the same period last year. Total assets of the Company were $379.2 million at September 30, 2011, a decrease of $16.4 million over the prior year. Advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank decreased by $7.0 million from $26.9 million at September 30, 2010 to $19.9 million at September 30, 2011.Due to its strong financial position, the Company has been able to maintain or increase its quarterly dividend since first declaring a dividend in 1995. Most recently, a quarterly cash dividend of $.31 per share was declared on October 28, 2011, to shareholders of record as of November 14, 2011, payable December 2, 2011.Ledyard Financial Group, Inc., headquartered in Hanover, New Hampshire, is the holding company for Ledyard National Bank. Ledyard National Bank, founded in 1991, is a full service community bank offering a broad range of banking, investment, tax and wealth management services in the Dartmouth-Lake Sunapee Region. Ledyard National Bank has eight offices with locations in Hanover, Lebanon, Lyme, New London, and West Lebanon, New Hampshire and in Norwich, Vermont.Ledyard Financial Group, Inc. shares can be bought and sold through the NASD sanctioned ‘OTC Markets’ under the trading symbol LFGP. Shares may be traded through an individual’s broker. For more information, please refer to the ‘Investor Relations’ section of the bank’s website at www.ledyardbank.com(link is external) or contact the Company’s Chief Financial Officer, Gregory D. Steverson. 150,000 483,662 302,373,239 Loans Receivable, net 1,927,036Earnings Per Common Share, basic 309,854,800 Allowance for Loan Losses 576,597 36,589,231 49,542,920 As of 09/30/2010 6,704,441 3,935,360 1.50% Non-performing Assets $0.93 136,722,119 $1.86 2.67% 5,825,704Non-interest Expense 12,169,588 34,773,626 Total Deposits 16.35% $0.93 2,953,522 $6,299,760 1,918,738 150,000 1,986,876 For the Nine Months Ended $5,594,452 $5,926,876 Book Value per Common Share Outstanding 1,571,625 $11,331,009Total Interest Expense $4,980,884 $33.92 Investment Securities 1.31% Ledyard Financial Group, Inc.Selected Financial Highlights(Unaudited) 9/30/2011 2,801,685 Stockholder’s Equity Allowance as a % of Total Loans $10,211,710 Total Assets 728,129last_img read more

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Editorial: The Clean Power Plan Is Far From Dead

first_imgEditorial: The Clean Power Plan Is Far From Dead FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享From the Los Angeles Times:The Supreme Court’s order late Tuesday halting President Obama’s Clean Power Plan is frustratingly opaque. The terse ruling offers no hints about why the court took the unusual step of pausing Obama’s important new regulations — which would have significantly curtailed emissions from the nations’ coal-fired electric plants — before a lower court had ruled on their legality. The justices may be sending the president a message about his expansive use of executive authority. Or the court may be trying to avoid a repeat of last summer’s Michigan v. EPA ruling, in which most of the nation’s power plants were already far along the path to compliance before the court got around to striking down the regulations that had been challenged in that case.Yet all is not lost. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit is expected to hear arguments in June on the merits of the challenge to the EPA’s regulations, and if the fight reaches the Supreme Court, a decision likely wouldn’t come until after Obama leaves office. If the EPA prevails, states will still have time to move away from coal-fired energy production under a timetable that is supposed to see reductions begin in 2022. If the EPA loses, the next president must work with Congress to achieve the same or an even more ambitious goal, though that seems likely only to happen if the Democrats take power. As it is, at least 18 states, including California, support the Clean Power Plan, and there is nothing to preclude them from moving ahead on their own (California has already practically eliminated coal from its energy portfolio, and is ahead of the federal Clean Power Plan timeline for reducing carbon emissions).Full editorial: The U.S. can’t allow Supreme Court clean power roadblock to slow its fight against climate changelast_img read more

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Wyoming Governor Says State Will ‘Double Down’ on Coal

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Christopher Coats for SNL:After two of the country’s largest coal producers announced hundreds of layoffs at Wyoming mines, the state’s political leadership responded with pledges of support and long-term services but few immediate solutions for the battered local industry.Late last week, Arch Coal Inc. and Peabody Energy Corp. announced cuts in staff at some of the country’s largest mines, citing an array of market and regulatory challenges that have weighed down the state’s struggling coal industry. A representative for the Campbell County Chamber of Commerce, near where the mines are located, told S&P Global Market Intelligence that further staff reductions had occurred in the area in recent months.Wyoming’s Republican Gov. Matt Mead responded to the layoffs and broader downturn hours after the reductions had been announced, calling a press conference to announce a “rapid response team” of state officials intended to help those communities impacted by the job losses.Mead went on to outline the host of challenges facing the state’s coal industry, noting that warmer-than-expected winter temperatures had dashed any hope of a recovery in demand this year. Further, coal export projects intended to allow Powder River Basin coal to reach the Asian market had met with further delays and resistance from coastal states.A few days after Mead’s press conference, the likelihood of new coal export projects continued to erode with news that the developers behind the Gateway Pacific project in Washington had paused its environmental review of the project.Despite those obstacles, Mead repeated plans to “double down” on his efforts to ensure that Wyoming coal has a future, including a pledge to continue his fight against Obama administration environmental regulations and support access to export markets. In 2015, Mead signed new bond legislation that would provide a billion dollars for infrastructure outside of the state. While the state law allows financial backing for any infrastructure projects outside of Wyoming, coal export terminals including the Gateway Pacific project have received the most attention since the Wyoming Infrastructure Authority received authority over such projects in 2014.Wyo. governor promises support for coal layoffs, warns of long-term challenges Wyoming Governor Says State Will ‘Double Down’ on Coallast_img read more

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India Pushing to Take Solar Leadership From China

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Quartz India:Since its big entry a decade ago, China has led the global solar energy industry. A massive manufacturing sector that has driven down costs, coupled with supportive government policies, have helped it commission multiple large-scale projects and become the world’s largest producer of solar energy.Meanwhile, neighbouring India has turned up at the party a little late—but is now racing ahead in terms of big projects.Half of the world’s 10 largest solar parks under construction currently are in India, says a report by US-based think tank Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA).China still has the largest ones. Its 1,547 megawatt (MW) Tengger Desert Solar Park, for instance, is the world’s biggest. But those that India’s building are larger. For instance, by early 2019, the work on a 2,225 MW facility at Bhadla, Rajasthan, is expected to be completed. A third of this plant is already operational. Also on the cards is a massive 5,000 MW solar park along the Gulf of Khambhat in Gujarat. Even for rooftop solar installation, India has gone big. A 19 MW system installed on an 82-acre campus of the RSSB Educational and Environmental Society in Amritsar, Punjab, is currently the world’s largest.“India has pioneered the concept of the ultra mega power plant (UMPP) in a single solar industrial park. This approach has been instrumental in driving economies of scale and procuring global capital flows…over the last two years with an immediate boon in the form of a halving of solar tariffs to a record low of Rs2.44 (per unit),” the IEEFA report said.The country is targeting an installed capacity of 100,000 MW of solar power by 2022, up from around 21,000 MW now. It is also chasing an overall renewable energy capacity of 175,000 MW by that year.More: India Is Beating China In The Race To Build Massive Solar Power Projects India Pushing to Take Solar Leadership From Chinalast_img read more

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South Australia electric sector on track to hit 75% renewables by 2025

first_imgSouth Australia electric sector on track to hit 75% renewables by 2025 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Guardian:South Australia’s energy minister says the state is on track to have 75% of its electricity from renewable sources by 2025 – the target set by the former Labor premier Jay Weatherill and once rejected by his Liberal government.The Liberal party was highly critical of Weatherill’s target when it was announced during this year’s South Australian election campaign, with the then state opposition leader, Steven Marshall, pledging to scrap it and the federal energy minister, Josh Frydenberg, likening the then premier to a clean energy addicted gambler “doubling down to chase his losses”. Prime minister Malcolm Turnbull had earlier described Weatherill’s renewable energy policy as “ideology and idiocy in equal measure”.But several expert analyses have found the state is likely to meet or nearly meet the aspirational target, which was not tied to a policy mechanism. The Australian Energy Market Operator has projected South Australia would have 73% renewable power by 2020/21 while consultants Green Energy Markets found it could reach 74% by 2025 without any additional policies being introduced.The South Australian energy and mining minister, Dan van Holst Pellekaan, said that was also his understanding. “That’s what the reports I’ve read are saying,” he said. “We need to harness it properly so consumers aren’t paying too high a price along the way.”Speaking in his electorate office in Port Augusta, home to the state’s coal power until the last plant closed in 2016, and now with up to 13 clean energy at varying stages of development including the solar thermal project, van Holst Pellekaan said the shift from coal to more clean energy in South Australia had been messier than it needed to be, but was inevitable. “We must transition away from fossil fuels towards renewable energy,” he said. “There’s no doubt about it. And we need to do it sensibly.”More: South Australia on track to meet 75% renewables target Liberals promised to scraplast_img read more

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IEA: Global coal demand to fall in 2019, remain roughly flat to 2024

first_imgIEA: Global coal demand to fall in 2019, remain roughly flat to 2024 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Guardian:Global demand for coal has fallen this year for the first time in two years as Europe and the U.S. turn their backs on coal-fired power plants in favour of cheap gas and renewable energy.A report from the International Energy Agency (IEA) found that the world’s appetite for coal declined in 2019 after a two-year resurgence following the steepest ever drop in the use of coal-fired power plants. The world’s energy watchdog said it is too soon to say whether the global appetite for coal would continue to decline because the fate of the industry rests largely in the hands of China’s policymakers.Coal remains the world’s single largest source of electricity generation, half of which is produced in China and used to power Chinese power plants.The IEA’s annual report on the coal industry revealed that the largest ever decline in the use of coal-fired electricity was led by steep cuts in coal demand from Europe and the U.S. Western countries are weaning their energy systems off coal power due to abundant cheaper alternatives such as renewable energy and gas, and flatlining energy demand.The IEA expects coal-fired electricity to rise only marginally between 2020 and 2024, at less than 1% a year, which should see its share of the global electricity mix fall to 35% in 2024 from 38% last year.But the forecasts could deviate widely, depending on China’s energy policy decisions in its next five-year plan, covering 2021 to 2025. The fossil fuel faces rising public opposition due to concerns over air pollution and the climate crisis. Many governments are now considering stronger climate and environmental policies as renewables and gas become cheaper to use. “If China changes – everything changes,” [Keisuke Sadamori, a director at the IEA] said.[Jillian Ambrose]More: World demand for coal falls despite growth in Asialast_img read more

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EU coal-fired electricity generation dropped 24% in 2019

first_imgEU coal-fired electricity generation dropped 24% in 2019 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Euractiv:Global warming emissions from the power sector fell by 12% last year, led by a steep decline in coal power generation, which was replaced half by natural gas and half by renewables, according to fresh data published on Wednesday (5 February).Hard coal and lignite-fired power generation fell in every EU country – and by 24% overall – according to fresh data on European power sector emissions, covering all EU member states, including the UK.The drop was sharper in 2019 than in any year since at least 1990, and could be attributed chiefly to Germany, Spain, the Netherlands, the UK, and Italy, which together accounted for 80% of coal power decline, the two think tanks said.“If you look at Western Europe, 70% of all coal plants will have been phased out in the next five years,” said Kristian Ruby, secretary-general of Eurelectric, a trade association. “By the end of the 2020s, coal will remain in place only in a minority of markets such as Germany, Poland, Romania, Bulgaria, Czechia and Slovenia,” Ruby told EURACTIV.Half of coal power capacity was replaced by renewables, whose share rose to 34.6% of total electricity generation, a new record high. The other half was replaced by natural gas, a fossil fuel which spews about 50% less carbon than coal when burned in power plants.2019 might also have marked a decisive turning point. For the first time, wind and solar power plants in the EU delivered more electricity than coal-fired power plants taken together, the report found.[Frédéric Simon]More: Power shift: EU coal output falls 24% in 2019last_img read more

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Morgan Stanley: 47GW of U.S. coal capacity to be uneconomic by 2024

first_imgMorgan Stanley: 47GW of U.S. coal capacity to be uneconomic by 2024 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC sees a $64 billion spending opportunity on top of double-digit earnings accretion for more than a dozen utilities that decide to retire uneconomic coal plants and replace them with cheaper renewables by 2025.“We compared the costs of operating each coal plant against our state-by-state forecasts of renewables costs across 13 stocks and identified [47,000 MW] of coal capacity that will become more expensive than renewables by 2024,” Morgan Stanley analysts wrote in a recent research report. “We estimate this represents a capex opportunity of [$64 billion] and earnings accretion for the stocks we cover of up to 14% in 2025.”The report, “The Second Wave of Clean Energy — Part II: Who Can Ride the Wave?” follows a December 2019 report in which the research firm forecast that about 70,000 MW to as much as 190,000 MW of coal-fired generation is “economically at risk” from the deployment of a “second wave of renewables” in the U.S. The research firm said these projections exclude about 24,000 MW of coal generation already set to shut down.“We think that the economics make sense that the utilities in general should be pursuing this just because it seems to benefit everybody,” Morgan Stanley analyst Stephen Byrd said in a Feb. 11 phone interview. “It benefits shareholders, customers and the planet.”Ameren Corp., American Electric Power Co. Inc., Duke Energy Corp. and Pinnacle West Capital Corp. are seen as best positioned to take advantage of a second wave of clean energy.[Darren Sweeney]More ($): Morgan Stanley: $64B capex upside for utilities replacing coal with renewableslast_img read more

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