Pennsylvania church unveils restored 500-year-old painting attributed to ‘minor master’

first_img Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service Rector Bath, NC Submit a Press Release Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel By David PaulsenPosted Feb 11, 2020 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH [Episcopal News Service] An Episcopal congregation in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, has unveiled a restored 500-year-old painting of Mary and Jesus, which had been in the parish’s possession for more than a century but only recently was revealed to be a rare work by an Italian artist from the Renaissance period.Christopher Daly, an art historian from Baltimore, Maryland, had been researching “minor masters” and came across a photo of “Madonna and Child,” a painting said to belong to St. James Episcopal Church in Lancaster, according to a Lancaster Online story. He called the church in January 2018 and visited later that year to view the painting up close.Daly told Lancaster Online that his analysis of the painting indicated it was produced by Giovanni Graffione, who lived from 1455 to 1527 and who, according to Daly, is remembered for only one other documented painting – “Virgin Adoring the Child,” at a church in Italy.The painting owned by St. James was a gift in 1908 from the family of one of the congregation’s former priests, who had purchased it decades earlier while serving at an Episcopal church in Rome, Italy. Daly’s inquiry sparked renewed interest in the painting and prompted St. James officials to restore it, with help from a grant.The restored painting was unveiled Feb. 10 as part of a church history lecture at the Lancaster History museum celebrating St. James’ 275th anniversary. It will remain on display at the museum through March as part of a St. James history exhibit.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Shreveport, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Pennsylvania church unveils restored 500-year-old painting attributed to ‘minor master’ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Albany, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more

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River Ranch / Jobe Corral Architects

first_img Tak S, Chu, P.E. Leap! Structures Projects United States Ada Corral, Camille Jobe Year:  Houses Lead Architect: Studio Lumina, Christina Brown “COPY” Save this picture!© Casey Dunn, Casey Woods+ 23Curated by Paula Pintos Share Contractor: River Ranch / Jobe Corral Architects Structural Engineer: Pilgrim Building Company, Branson Fustes 2018 Architects: Jobe Corral Architects Area Area of this architecture project Manufacturers: AutoDesk, Arcon Glas, Badeloft, Boffi, Ferguson, Signature Hardware, Vent-a-Hood, Adobe, Ashley Norton, Drophouse Design, Enabler, Envornimental Survey Consulting, Flitch, Trimble, Wolf Energy Consultant: River Ranch / Jobe Corral ArchitectsSave this projectSaveRiver Ranch / Jobe Corral Architects Photographs:  Casey Dunn, Casey Woods Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project “COPY” Area:  3592 ft² Year Completion year of this architecture project Photographs Lighting Design: Design Team:Sarah Hafley, Chris MinorAudio/Visual:ALP Design Solutions, Abel RodriguezPool:Hample Pools, Carl HampleCity:BlancoCountry:United StatesMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Casey Dunn, Casey WoodsRecommended ProductsWindowsLibartVertical Retracting Doors & WindowsWindowsVitrocsaMinimalist Window – SlidingDoorsStudcoAccess Panels – AccessDorDoorsC.R. LaurenceCRL-U.S. Aluminum Entice Series Entrance SystemDriving elements • physical and visual connection to the land • Responds to the site: shelters from elements while opening to the view • Natural materials: rammed earth, vertical grain cedar, limestone • Rainwater catchment, and underground cistern serve the entire residence This residence, located in the Texas Hill Country, is about the connection to the land. The team agreed from the first visit that the structure should be integrated into its surroundings, which is composed of beautiful oak trees, open views, and a slice of the Blanco River. In this setting, it is essential to seek protection from the sun, the strong winds, and the flooding rains.Save this picture!© Casey Dunn, Casey WoodsSave this picture!PlanSave this picture!© Casey Dunn, Casey WoodsThis need for the most basic form of shelter, plus the Owners’ love of the land, drove the concept and design of the River Ranch. The River Ranch program is laid out in a courtyard plan, which is formed by the main house, the guest wing, and the pool. The outer layer of the courtyard is made of 2’ thick rammed earth walls that appear to emerge from the land and form a protective shell for the interior of the building.Save this picture!© Casey Dunn, Casey WoodsThe color and texture of the rammed earth blend the walls to its surroundings while creating a strong anchor on the site. Emulating the light-filtering quality of the trees, deep steel trellises and vertical wood screens provide another layer of protection by addressing the sun and supplying shade. The thick walls and the shading elements allow for large expanses of glass that open towards the courtyard and river views. The indoor/outdoor relationship is strengthened by specific moments that connect the user to the land, the trees, and the view.Save this picture!© Casey Dunn, Casey WoodsThe central courtyard houses an underground cistern that serves as the entire water supply for the residence. Above ground, the courtyard includes limestone porches and terraces with all native plants, that serve as the transition from the building to the natural landscape. Whether inside or outside, the users are able to enjoy the land while shielded from the elements and feel a strong sense of place.Save this picture!© Casey Dunn, Casey WoodsProject gallerySee allShow lessÖtzi Peak 3251m Viewing Platform / noa* network of architectureSelected ProjectsDesigning for Hand Hygiene at the Seraph-McSparren Pediatric Inpatient CenterArticles Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/947006/river-ranch-jobe-corral-architects Clipboard Environmental Energy Consulting, David Mahler Landscape: Positive Energy, Kristof Irwin CopyHouses•Blanco, United States ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/947006/river-ranch-jobe-corral-architects Clipboard ArchDaily CopyAbout this officeJobe Corral ArchitectsOfficeFollow#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesOn FacebookBlancoUnited StatesPublished on September 08, 2020Cite: “River Ranch / Jobe Corral Architects” 08 Sep 2020. ArchDaily. Accessed 10 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogAluminium CompositesTechnowoodHow to Design a Façade with AluProfile Vertical ProfilesGlassMitrexSolar GreenhouseMetal PanelsAurubisOxidized Copper: Nordic BrownDoorsEGGERWood Laminate Doors in Molecular Plant Science InstituteStonesCosentinoSurfaces – Silestone® Nebula SeriesWall / Ceiling LightsLouis PoulsenLamp – LP RiplsWood Boards / HPL PanelsBruagRoom Dividers – Partition Wall MDFStonesNeolithSintered Stone – Mar del PlataWindowspanoramah!®ah! SecurityPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesULMA Architectural SolutionsMIS Facade PanelCarpetsFabromont AGTextile Floor Covering – Orbital® 07 COLORpunkt®LightsNorka lightingLuminaire – BelfastMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! 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Andy Stapp, a thorn in the Pentagon’s side

first_imgFrom left, Terry Klug and Andy Stapp leaving Klug’s court-martial at Fort Dix, 1969.Andrew Dean Stapp could have been an archaeologist, a historian or even a stand-up comic. Instead, he chose to focus his broad spectrum of talents on fighting the military brass and ending the Vietnam War.Andy, as everyone called him, died on Sept. 3 at the age of 70. When only 23 years old, while a private at Fort Sill, Okla., he had gathered together a group of active-duty GIs to form the American Servicemen’s Union. This organization drew up a 10-point program of demands ranging from the right to refuse illegal orders — like the order to fight in Vietnam — to the election of officers by the ranks and an end to racism and sexism. It grew into the most audacious thorn in the Pentagon’s side.At its height the ASU had enrolled thousands of card-carrying members scattered on bases all over the world, in all branches of the U.S. military. Its newspaper, The Bond, was read in trenches, cockpits and submarines. It was mailed out to many thousands of active-duty military personnel and then passed hand-to-hand to countless thousands more. Some mailroom clerks subscribed their entire units to this unabashedly radical newspaper. Its centerfold was devoted to unflattering descriptions of brutal officers and noncoms who had been nominated by their men to be “Pig of the Month.”Stapp was court-martialed twice and then discharged from the Army in early 1968 after a field board hearing that declared him “undesirable.” The support he received from the soldiers in his unit was amazing. Many testified in his defense. Their testimony clearly convinced the brass that throwing Stapp in the stockade would probably instigate a rebellion. He also had extremely capable free legal defense provided by Atty. Michael Kennedy of the National Emergency Civil Liberties Committee. A few years later, after winning a civilian court suit, his discharge was changed to “honorable.”Stapp was a prodigious reader and walking encyclopedia of knowledge, both contemporary and historical, to the end of his life. He educated everyone around him with a running commentary on current events that was factual but delivered with a deadpan, biting wit.His narrative style can be experienced in his book “Up Against the Brass,” published in 1970 by Simon & Schuster, in which he related the story of the ASU and gave some of his personal history.After graduating from high school, it was a trip he made with a group of archaeologists to digs in Egypt that first made him aware of the terrible legacy left by colonialism. From childhood he had admired the great civilizations of ancient Rome and Egypt. He saw firsthand how British colonial rule had left the people of Egypt impoverished and ground down.His first act of rebellion against the Vietnam War was on Oct. 16, 1965, when he burned his draft card, along with a group of fellow students at Penn State. But he soon saw that such symbolic acts were not enough. So the following May, he showed up for induction and joined the Army — with the intention of organizing among the GIs. He succeeded beyond his wildest dreams.He wrote in “Up Against the Brass”:“We talked to everyone who would listen. Soon the entire battalion knew our views. Only a handful showed hostility. Often in the barracks, after lights-out, we would kid about the war. Dick Wheaton, a marvelous mimic, could sound exactly like Lyndon Johnson. He would pretend he was LBJ holding a press conference and the guys would ask questions.“‘Mr. President, why are we in Vietnam?’“‘Son, to save it from the Communists. Ah want yuh to know that if we have to destroy that country to save it, we will.’“‘Mr. President, are you going to send additional troops to Vietnam?’“‘Our commitment is firm, son, firm. Ah’m not gonna hide mah tail between mah legs and run. Ah’m willin’ to fight to the last drop of yore blood to achieve peace.’“‘Mr. President, what do you think of the GIs at Fort Sill?’“‘Those Communist GIs are a thohn in mah side.’”Supported other rebellious GIsAfter being discharged from the Army, Stapp made many trips to support soldiers who were fighting the racist, sexist, top-down rule of the military machine. He went to Fort Hood, Texas, to defend the Fort Hood 43 — 43 Black GIs who sat down and refused to be sent to Chicago in 1968 to suppress demonstrations at the Democratic National Convention there. He organized support for a group of soldiers at Fort Dix, N.J., who were being court-martialed for a rebellion in the stockade. One of the GI leaders, Terry Klug, had organized a powerful chapter of the ASU among the imprisoned soldiers.After the war finally ended, Stapp continued the struggle for justice and equality as a writer for this newspaper, Workers World. Readers tell us that in those days the first thing they looked for each week was his column, which raked the ruling class and its stooges over the coals for their crimes against the workers and oppressed — using his unique and powerful brand of humor.He joined Workers World Party — the “parent” organization of Youth Against War & Fascism — and spoke at many Party conferences. He had honed his oratorical skills speaking at campuses during the war in order to raise funds for the ASU.For the last 30 years of his life, he was a history teacher at the Hudson School in Hoboken, N.J., where he inspired new generations to question all the self-serving propaganda that is dished out by the establishment as “education.” He was so beloved by his students that, year after year, he was elected by the graduating class to address their commencement celebration.A personal note: This writer was among the group from Youth Against War & Fascism who drove from New York City to Oklahoma in July 1967 to attend Andy’s second court-martial.We didn’t make it to the trial — we were all barred from the base and two of us, Maryann Weissman and Key Martin, were arrested. They had been in Lawton, Okla., for several months sending out press releases and helping the GIs in various ways. They each served six months in federal penitentiaries just for trying to enter the base to attend what the Army claimed was an “open” court-martial. One of our group given a bar order that day was Eddie Oquendo, who later went to prison for resisting the draft.Once the court-martial was over, those of us not in jail got to meet Andy and other GIs, who regaled us with descriptions of the farce that had just occurred. Andy and I met again in New York when he was on leave and we were married in October 1967. Two years later, after he had been put out of the Army, our daughter, Katherine Stapp, was born. While we haven’t lived together for years, I still have Andy’s ASU membership card from 1971, which lists the 10 demands and the slogan: “To win a Bill of Rights for rank-and-file servicemen and women.”FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Jewish activists challenge Trump’s anti-im/migrant policies

first_imgMore and more progressive Jewish activists are joining the struggle against the Trump administration’s racist repression of im/migrants, including detention under horrific conditions, ruthless separation of families, abuse of children and deportation of adults, often parents. Each day brings new federal decrees for even more oppressive and cruel policies toward desperate refugees fleeing violence and poverty in their homelands, much of it exacerbated by U.S. policies.The detention camps holding migrants have been called “concentration camps” by several progressive organizations and individuals, including Japanese-American actor George Takai, who along with his family was interned in Arkansas and then California during World War II.This term has struck a chord with many pro-immigrant Jewish activists who agree with this characterization and have been demonstrating in increasing numbers against these fascistic government policies. They see a parallel to the Nazis’ horrific treatment of Jewish people inside Germany in the 1930s.Trump’s racism and xenophobia—​on full display since the beginning of his election campaign—​have fanned the flames of the ultra-right. His hostile attacks on Mexican people and Central American refugees, his slurs against Haiti and African countries, his Muslim ban, his defense of “very fine people on both sides” after the white supremacist attacks in Charlottesville, Va., in August 2017—​all are not only outrageous, but dangerous. His words have incited hate crimes and murderous violence against Latinx immigrants, Jews, Muslims and other peoples.Showing multinational solidarityTrump’s validation of white nationalism and use of anti-Jewish stereotypes and rhetoric have angered Jewish people, spurring many progressives, especially youth, into action. Significantly, many Jewish activists are not only protesting anti-Semitism but showing their commitment to multinational solidarity, demonstrating against attacks on Latinx, Arab, Muslim, African and other im/migrants.Audrey Sasson of Jews for Racial and Economic Justice (JREJ) emphasized that “[Trump] is using a very anti-Semitic trope and pitting Jews against everyone else. It’s not an accident when Jews are mobilizing in ever greater numbers. We are not going to be scared away out of our solidarity.” (apnews.com, Aug. 22)In other manifestations of solidarity, Jewish Voice for Peace has strongly defended Muslim congresspeople Ilhan Omar and Rashida Tlaib. Members of If Not Now have been arrested while opposing Israel’s occupation of the West Bank, Gaza and East Jerusalem and the oppression of Palestinians inside Israel.Even as Trump spews divisive anti-Jewish statements, he is a close ally of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and an avid supporter of the Zionist state. It should be remembered that Israel is a construct, established by U.S. and British imperialism in the middle of the Arab world, to protect their interests, suppress people’s movements in the Arab countries and repress the Palestinian people. The U.S. Congress allocates billions of dollars a year to Israel, mostly for the military, including to purchase weapons used against the Palestinians.Jews against ICEA network of Jewish organizations has increasingly fought Trump’s anti-immigrant policies using the Twitter hashtags #JewsAgainstIce, #ClosetheCamps and #NeverAgainIsNow. They collaborate with immigrant groups and other progressive organizations.Never Again Action was established in late June to oppose the horrors of Trump’s anti-immigrant policies. And act they do. They started off by protesting outside a migrant detention center in Elizabeth, N.J., on June 30; 200 people joined and dozens were arrested. The group has initiated over 38 protests across the country since that date.A thousand Jewish activists and allies occupied a New York Amazon store on Aug. 11 to protest the corporation’s ties to Palantir, which provides Immigration and Customs Enforcement with data for use in immigration raids. Forty-four people were arrested at the action, organized by a coalition of Jewish organizations, including JREJ and NAA.On that day—​a holy day to observant Jews—​thousands joined in actions at 60 locations across the country to protest Trump’s immigration policies, reported the Aug. 11 Washington Post.‘Shut the camps!’NAA’s Rhode Island chapter and immigrant rights groups demonstrated on Aug. 14 outside the for-profit Wyatt Detention Facility in Central Falls, R.I. Under an agreement with ICE, 100 asylum seekers are imprisoned there. Over 500 Jewish and immigrant rights activists and their allies demanded the prison terminate its contract with ICE and release all immigrant detainees. Chants rang out saying: “Shut the camps!” “Justice now!” and “Close Wyatt!”Suddenly, Capt. Thomas Woodworth, a senior corrections officer, drove a pickup truck directly at protesters, including youth and seniors, who were peacefully blocking the facility’s entrance. A participant described events: “The truck was stopped and then … the driver stepped on the gas, revved up and started plowing forward, despite the fact that there were people standing right in front of the truck and people still sitting on the ground.” (npr.org, Aug. 15)Following that attack, other prison guards pepper-sprayed the demonstrators in the face. Five people were hospitalized, including 64-year-old Jerry Belair, who had a broken leg and internal bleeding.John Prince, community activist and co-organizer of Behind the Wall Providence, a group there in solidarity, commented about Woodworth’s deliberate assault, which injured peaceful protesters: “If an officer can get away with this act of attempted murder, what’s wrong with this country?”After a video of this incident went viral, prison officials put Woodworth on administrative leave. On Aug. 16, he resigned.NAA issued a statement the same day, saying: “If these officers felt empowered to attack a group of protesters in front of the public and media, imagine what kind of violence must be taking place inside the prison, out of sight, against vulnerable immigrants and people of color.” The group’s Facebook page vows: “We will keep protesting until all immigrants have been released from prisons and concentration camps, and until papers have been secured for the 11 million undocumented people living in this country.”Five NAA activists appeared in court on Aug. 20 in Houston on charges of blocking a highway eight days earlier, while protesting the persecution of migrants and detention of minors separated from their parents at the for-profit Southwest Key Detention Center. All face a six-month jail sentence and $2,000 fine. Latinx and immigrant rights organizations, Muslims, workers and anti-fascist groups participated in the Aug. 12 action.The writer’s grandparents fled anti-Jewish pogroms in 1907 in eastern Poland, which had been annexed by imperial Russia.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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La Cañada Presbyterian Church’s Parent Ed Present Parent Express – Preschoolers and Parenting Your Exceptional Child

first_img Community News Community News Top of the News 64 recommendedShareShareTweetSharePin it Make a comment faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. HerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyIs It Bad To Give Your Boyfriend An Ultimatum?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThese Are 15 Great Style Tips From Asian WomenHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyCostume That Makes Actresses Beneath Practically UnrecognizableHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyShort On Time? 10-Minute Workouts Are Just What You NeedHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty12 Most Breathtaking Trends In Fashion HistoryHerbeautyHerbeauty First Heatwave Expected Next Week center_img Subscribe Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Teacher Heather Ehrhart (center back) with Parent Education Class at HalloweenLa Cañada Presbyterian Church (LCPC)’s Parent Education Program is excited to announce two exciting evening classes through our Parent Express Program: Preschoolers and Parenting Your Exceptional Child.Teacher Vickie RekedalInitially launched in 2017, Parent Express’s purpose is to provide evening education opportunities for parents who are unable to attend our widely popular daytime Parent Ed classes. These relevant and information packed sessions provide parents with a combination of small and large group discussions focusing on practical tools for the essential challenges facing today’s parents. Parent Express classes meet in the evenings for 4 weeks and are taught by our experienced Parent Ed instructors. All classes are designed for parents only and typically meet from 7:00 – 8:30. Registration is $100 for the first registrant and $25 for each additional registrant (spouse, partner, caretaker, grandparent, etc.). Affordable child care is also available.Parenting Preschoolers will run from March 4 through March 25 on Wednesday evenings from 7:00 – 8:30 pm. Taught by highly regarded teacher, Heather Ehrhart, this class will focus on understanding thedevelopmental growth of your 3-5 year old child, self-regulation and positive discipline techniques, exploration of effective parenting styles and nurturing the parent-child bond, and finding family balance.Parenting Your Exceptional Child will run from March 2 – March 30 (no class March 16) on Monday evenings from 7:00 – 8:30 p.m. Taught by Vicki Rekedal, the class will cover current brain research with practical application for children who are differently wired including the learning continuum, anxiety, and advocacy.Kicking off its 41st year of helping families thrive, Parent Ed offers 16 daytime classes and 7 evening classes for parents of children 0-18 that provide education, friendship, and sustenance. Daytime classes include Parent-and-Child Classes where both children and adults form lasting friendships as well as receive valuable education from seasoned educators as well as Parent-Only Sessions to talk over the extra set of challenges that accompany raising elementary, tween and teen children. Parent and Child classes include Expectant and New Parents, Non-Separating Toddlers, Two-Year Olds, Parenting 3 – 4s, and Family Class. Parents with school-aged children attend Parent-Only Sessions. Classes include Parents of Elementary Kids, Parents of Tweens, Parents of High Schoolers, Parenting Your Exceptional Child, and the new Grandparenting Class. Classes meet weekly September through May and attract over 600 participants from 22 different cities. Classes fill up quickly, so register ASAP! Please go to www.lacanadapc.org/parented for class listings, staff bios, and online registration. Scholarships and payment plans are available online. Affordable childcare is offered during all class times. La Canada Presbyterian Church is located at 626 Foothill in La Canada. Faith & Youth La Cañada Presbyterian Church’s Parent Ed Present Parent Express – Preschoolers and Parenting Your Exceptional Child By KATIE ENNEY Published on Friday, February 14, 2020 | 6:21 pm More Cool Stuff Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Business Newslast_img read more

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County closing for President’s Day

first_img County closing for President’s Day Twitter Facebook Local News Facebook By admin – February 18, 2018 Previous articleBUILDING PERMITS: Feb. 5, – Feb. 9, 2018Next articlePermian class teaches students what goes into animation, video games admin Twitter WhatsApp Pinterest Pinterest WhatsApp Ector County SheriffThe business offices of the Ector County Sheriff’s Office will be closed Monday in observance of President’s Day.Regular business hours will resume Tuesday morning at 8 a.m.last_img read more

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Peru drug charge women may plead guilty to secure shorter sentences

first_img Google+ Facebook Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Google+ The two women arrested in Peru trying to board a flight to Spain with 11 kgs of cocaine in their luggage are expected to attend a court hearing today.Twenty-year-old Michaella McCollum from Tyrone and 19-year-old Melissa Reid from Scotland claim they were coerced into transporting the drugs by an armed gang.The prosecutor handling their case says they face a minimum of six years in prison if they plead guilty and a further sentence reduction may be possible if the women co-operated as witnesses against others.The girls are expected to be interrogated by a judge later today, amid reports that both will plead guilty. Peru drug charge women may plead guilty to secure shorter sentences Pinterest WhatsApp News By News Highland – September 24, 2013 Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry WhatsApp Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Facebook Twitter 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Previous articleProminent Derry dissident has assaulting police charge droppedNext articleFormer Harps Manager King takes charge of Ireland News Highland Pinterest 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan firelast_img read more

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Penneys call for extension of trading hours when stores reopen

first_img Facebook News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Homepage BannerNews Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme WhatsApp By News Highland – November 6, 2020 Google+ Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Penneys is calling for an extension of its trading hours when stores reopen in December.In a statement, the company says that it would allow them to cater for the higher anticipated customer demand, and help to reduce queues, by spreading shopping hours over a longer period of time.It says that stores have extensive safety measures in place to help protect customers and employees, including Perspex screens and increased cleaning.It was reported earlier this week that Penneys bosses hope to open some of their stores for 24 hours next month. Twitter Google+ Pinterestcenter_img Pinterest Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Previous articleManagement confirm Covid outbreak at LUHNext articleExclusive: Two arrested over car theft & fire in Muff News Highland Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Penneys call for extension of trading hours when stores reopen Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Facebook Community Enhancement Programme open for applicationslast_img read more

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Man wins lottery for the sixth time with $250,000 jackpot prize

first_imgCatLane/iStockBy JON HAWORTH, ABC News(MERIDIAN, Idaho) — Money doesn’t grow on trees but it comes awfully close for a man in Idaho who won the lottery — for the sixth time.Bryan Moss, from Meridian, Idaho, won a quarter of a million dollars on the Idaho Lottery Scratch Game $250,000 Crossword on Thursday, Jan. 28 — his sixth big prize lottery win but his first time winning the jackpot, according to the Idaho Lottery.“I’m proud to help support Idaho public schools, that’s really why I play,” said Moss who owns the Newko Sport and Nutrition health store in Meridian.Don’t bother asking him to play for you though.“I’ve tried playing for others,” Ross said in a thread on his Facebook page announcing the big win. “It doesn’t work.”His winning ticket was purchased at the ExtraMile on Eagle Road and Goldstone in Meridian and for their part in selling the winning ticket, ExtraMile will receive a bonus payment of $20,000 from the Idaho Lottery.As for what he will do with the money, Moss already knows.“He plans to put his winnings aside for his daughter’s future education,” according to the statement from the Idaho Lottery confirming Moss’ sixth win.Since it began in 1989, the Idaho Lottery says it has “sold over $4.2 billion in products, awarded more than $2.6 billion in prizes to players, returned $249 million in retail commissions, and distributed $961.5 million in Lottery dividends to Idaho public schools and buildings.”Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Breonna Taylor’s mom seeking justice one year later: ‘They should be held accountable’

first_imgBreonna Taylor FamilyBy EMILY SHAPIRO andd SABINA GHEBREMEDHIN, ABC News(NEW YORK) — One year after Breonna Taylor was shot dead by police in her Louisville, Kentucky, home, no officers have been charged in connection to her death, and her mother is desperate to see justice.“These officers … they committed a crime and they should be held accountable for it,” Taylor’s mother, Tamika Palmer, said in an interview with ABC News’ Good Morning America 3: What You Need to Know.Watch the interview Friday at 1 p.m. ET or 12 p.m. CT on Good Morning America 3: What You Need to Know.“There’s been no justice,” Palmer said, adding that her family is “still in an uproar.”“I still don’t have any comfort,” she added. “And it’s definitely not easier. It’s a year for everybody else, but every day is still March the 13th to me.”Shooting sparks nationwide protestsShortly after midnight on March 13, 2020, Taylor, a 26-year-old Black medical worker, was asleep at home with her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker.Officers arrived and executed a “no-knock” search warrant as part of an investigation into a suspected drug operation, allegedly linked to Taylor’s ex-boyfriend.Walker, who claims he thought the officers were intruders, fired one gunshot, striking an officer in the leg. In response, police opened fire, and Taylor was shot multiple times. No drugs were found in Taylor’s apartment.Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly, who was shot, contends that he and the other officers knocked on Taylor’s door multiple times and repeatedly yelled, “Police, search warrant!” before they rammed the door open. But Walker and 11 other witnesses at Taylor’s apartment complex claimed they didn’t hear police announce themselves before storming in.Walker initially was charged with attempted murder of a police officer, but those charges were dropped. This month, a judge signed an order permanently closing the criminal case against Walker.One officer involved in the shooting, Brett Hankison, has been fired, and the others were placed on administrative duty.But at first no charges were brought against any of them, which sparked protests throughout the U.S.Kentucky state Attorney General Daniel Cameron said the officers were justified in their use of deadly force because Walker fired the first shot.In September, Cameron convened a grand jury to investigate possible charges against the officers. A grand jury indicted Hankison on three counts of first-degree wanton endangerment of Taylor’s neighbors, for firing into the apartment directly behind Taylor’s, where three people were inside. Hankison pleaded not guilty.Cameron told Louisville station WDRB-TV in September that his office didn’t give the grand jury the option to consider murder charges.As the months have ticked by, Palmer’s lawyer, Lonita Baker, told GMA 3 that it’s “very possible that a prosecutor could indict, and I still encourage our local prosecutors to get involved.”“We want a grand jury to hear charges against the officers for the murder of Brianna Taylor,” Baker said.‘Hopefully to not have another Breonna’In January, two other officers involved, Myles Cosgrove and Detective Joshua Jaynes, were fired from the police department. Cosgrove fired the shot that killed Taylor per a ballistics analysis. Jaynes wasn’t at the shooting but prepared the search warrant.Mattingly, who also fired into Taylor’s home and was shot in the leg during the raid, has not been fired.A federal investigation into possible civil rights violations is ongoing.“It is our hope that at the conclusion of the federal investigation that [the officers] are indicted for those charges, and they are prosecuted to the full extent of the law,” Baker said.Meanwhile, some policing changes have been made in the wake of Taylor’s death.Louisville’s new police chief, former Atlanta Police Chief Erika Shields, started in January, and when she was announced as the new chief she said she was ready to take on the city’s healing and the rebuilding of community trust.“We have to also remember the progress we’ve made for Black women in America, that’s the legacy of Breonna Taylor,” lawyer Ben Crump, who represents Taylor’s family, told ABC News in a statement. “We have to remember that Black women matters too.”In June 2020, the Louisville Metro Council unanimously passed Breonna’s Law, outlawing “no-knock” warrants and requiring body cameras be turned on before and after every search. The officers involved in Taylor’s shooting were not wearing body cameras.And last month, a bill limiting the use of no-knock warrants passed the Kentucky Senate unanimously.Palmer told GMA 3 that she’s yet to see cases in which these changes have been enacted, but added that she’s “grateful to have it there — hopefully to not have another Breonna.”Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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