Editorial: The Clean Power Plan Is Far From Dead

first_imgEditorial: The Clean Power Plan Is Far From Dead FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享From the Los Angeles Times:The Supreme Court’s order late Tuesday halting President Obama’s Clean Power Plan is frustratingly opaque. The terse ruling offers no hints about why the court took the unusual step of pausing Obama’s important new regulations — which would have significantly curtailed emissions from the nations’ coal-fired electric plants — before a lower court had ruled on their legality. The justices may be sending the president a message about his expansive use of executive authority. Or the court may be trying to avoid a repeat of last summer’s Michigan v. EPA ruling, in which most of the nation’s power plants were already far along the path to compliance before the court got around to striking down the regulations that had been challenged in that case.Yet all is not lost. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit is expected to hear arguments in June on the merits of the challenge to the EPA’s regulations, and if the fight reaches the Supreme Court, a decision likely wouldn’t come until after Obama leaves office. If the EPA prevails, states will still have time to move away from coal-fired energy production under a timetable that is supposed to see reductions begin in 2022. If the EPA loses, the next president must work with Congress to achieve the same or an even more ambitious goal, though that seems likely only to happen if the Democrats take power. As it is, at least 18 states, including California, support the Clean Power Plan, and there is nothing to preclude them from moving ahead on their own (California has already practically eliminated coal from its energy portfolio, and is ahead of the federal Clean Power Plan timeline for reducing carbon emissions).Full editorial: The U.S. can’t allow Supreme Court clean power roadblock to slow its fight against climate changelast_img read more

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Wyoming Governor Says State Will ‘Double Down’ on Coal

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Christopher Coats for SNL:After two of the country’s largest coal producers announced hundreds of layoffs at Wyoming mines, the state’s political leadership responded with pledges of support and long-term services but few immediate solutions for the battered local industry.Late last week, Arch Coal Inc. and Peabody Energy Corp. announced cuts in staff at some of the country’s largest mines, citing an array of market and regulatory challenges that have weighed down the state’s struggling coal industry. A representative for the Campbell County Chamber of Commerce, near where the mines are located, told S&P Global Market Intelligence that further staff reductions had occurred in the area in recent months.Wyoming’s Republican Gov. Matt Mead responded to the layoffs and broader downturn hours after the reductions had been announced, calling a press conference to announce a “rapid response team” of state officials intended to help those communities impacted by the job losses.Mead went on to outline the host of challenges facing the state’s coal industry, noting that warmer-than-expected winter temperatures had dashed any hope of a recovery in demand this year. Further, coal export projects intended to allow Powder River Basin coal to reach the Asian market had met with further delays and resistance from coastal states.A few days after Mead’s press conference, the likelihood of new coal export projects continued to erode with news that the developers behind the Gateway Pacific project in Washington had paused its environmental review of the project.Despite those obstacles, Mead repeated plans to “double down” on his efforts to ensure that Wyoming coal has a future, including a pledge to continue his fight against Obama administration environmental regulations and support access to export markets. In 2015, Mead signed new bond legislation that would provide a billion dollars for infrastructure outside of the state. While the state law allows financial backing for any infrastructure projects outside of Wyoming, coal export terminals including the Gateway Pacific project have received the most attention since the Wyoming Infrastructure Authority received authority over such projects in 2014.Wyo. governor promises support for coal layoffs, warns of long-term challenges Wyoming Governor Says State Will ‘Double Down’ on Coallast_img read more

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India Pushing to Take Solar Leadership From China

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Quartz India:Since its big entry a decade ago, China has led the global solar energy industry. A massive manufacturing sector that has driven down costs, coupled with supportive government policies, have helped it commission multiple large-scale projects and become the world’s largest producer of solar energy.Meanwhile, neighbouring India has turned up at the party a little late—but is now racing ahead in terms of big projects.Half of the world’s 10 largest solar parks under construction currently are in India, says a report by US-based think tank Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA).China still has the largest ones. Its 1,547 megawatt (MW) Tengger Desert Solar Park, for instance, is the world’s biggest. But those that India’s building are larger. For instance, by early 2019, the work on a 2,225 MW facility at Bhadla, Rajasthan, is expected to be completed. A third of this plant is already operational. Also on the cards is a massive 5,000 MW solar park along the Gulf of Khambhat in Gujarat. Even for rooftop solar installation, India has gone big. A 19 MW system installed on an 82-acre campus of the RSSB Educational and Environmental Society in Amritsar, Punjab, is currently the world’s largest.“India has pioneered the concept of the ultra mega power plant (UMPP) in a single solar industrial park. This approach has been instrumental in driving economies of scale and procuring global capital flows…over the last two years with an immediate boon in the form of a halving of solar tariffs to a record low of Rs2.44 (per unit),” the IEEFA report said.The country is targeting an installed capacity of 100,000 MW of solar power by 2022, up from around 21,000 MW now. It is also chasing an overall renewable energy capacity of 175,000 MW by that year.More: India Is Beating China In The Race To Build Massive Solar Power Projects India Pushing to Take Solar Leadership From Chinalast_img read more

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South Australia electric sector on track to hit 75% renewables by 2025

first_imgSouth Australia electric sector on track to hit 75% renewables by 2025 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Guardian:South Australia’s energy minister says the state is on track to have 75% of its electricity from renewable sources by 2025 – the target set by the former Labor premier Jay Weatherill and once rejected by his Liberal government.The Liberal party was highly critical of Weatherill’s target when it was announced during this year’s South Australian election campaign, with the then state opposition leader, Steven Marshall, pledging to scrap it and the federal energy minister, Josh Frydenberg, likening the then premier to a clean energy addicted gambler “doubling down to chase his losses”. Prime minister Malcolm Turnbull had earlier described Weatherill’s renewable energy policy as “ideology and idiocy in equal measure”.But several expert analyses have found the state is likely to meet or nearly meet the aspirational target, which was not tied to a policy mechanism. The Australian Energy Market Operator has projected South Australia would have 73% renewable power by 2020/21 while consultants Green Energy Markets found it could reach 74% by 2025 without any additional policies being introduced.The South Australian energy and mining minister, Dan van Holst Pellekaan, said that was also his understanding. “That’s what the reports I’ve read are saying,” he said. “We need to harness it properly so consumers aren’t paying too high a price along the way.”Speaking in his electorate office in Port Augusta, home to the state’s coal power until the last plant closed in 2016, and now with up to 13 clean energy at varying stages of development including the solar thermal project, van Holst Pellekaan said the shift from coal to more clean energy in South Australia had been messier than it needed to be, but was inevitable. “We must transition away from fossil fuels towards renewable energy,” he said. “There’s no doubt about it. And we need to do it sensibly.”More: South Australia on track to meet 75% renewables target Liberals promised to scraplast_img read more

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IEA: Global coal demand to fall in 2019, remain roughly flat to 2024

first_imgIEA: Global coal demand to fall in 2019, remain roughly flat to 2024 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Guardian:Global demand for coal has fallen this year for the first time in two years as Europe and the U.S. turn their backs on coal-fired power plants in favour of cheap gas and renewable energy.A report from the International Energy Agency (IEA) found that the world’s appetite for coal declined in 2019 after a two-year resurgence following the steepest ever drop in the use of coal-fired power plants. The world’s energy watchdog said it is too soon to say whether the global appetite for coal would continue to decline because the fate of the industry rests largely in the hands of China’s policymakers.Coal remains the world’s single largest source of electricity generation, half of which is produced in China and used to power Chinese power plants.The IEA’s annual report on the coal industry revealed that the largest ever decline in the use of coal-fired electricity was led by steep cuts in coal demand from Europe and the U.S. Western countries are weaning their energy systems off coal power due to abundant cheaper alternatives such as renewable energy and gas, and flatlining energy demand.The IEA expects coal-fired electricity to rise only marginally between 2020 and 2024, at less than 1% a year, which should see its share of the global electricity mix fall to 35% in 2024 from 38% last year.But the forecasts could deviate widely, depending on China’s energy policy decisions in its next five-year plan, covering 2021 to 2025. The fossil fuel faces rising public opposition due to concerns over air pollution and the climate crisis. Many governments are now considering stronger climate and environmental policies as renewables and gas become cheaper to use. “If China changes – everything changes,” [Keisuke Sadamori, a director at the IEA] said.[Jillian Ambrose]More: World demand for coal falls despite growth in Asialast_img read more

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EU coal-fired electricity generation dropped 24% in 2019

first_imgEU coal-fired electricity generation dropped 24% in 2019 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Euractiv:Global warming emissions from the power sector fell by 12% last year, led by a steep decline in coal power generation, which was replaced half by natural gas and half by renewables, according to fresh data published on Wednesday (5 February).Hard coal and lignite-fired power generation fell in every EU country – and by 24% overall – according to fresh data on European power sector emissions, covering all EU member states, including the UK.The drop was sharper in 2019 than in any year since at least 1990, and could be attributed chiefly to Germany, Spain, the Netherlands, the UK, and Italy, which together accounted for 80% of coal power decline, the two think tanks said.“If you look at Western Europe, 70% of all coal plants will have been phased out in the next five years,” said Kristian Ruby, secretary-general of Eurelectric, a trade association. “By the end of the 2020s, coal will remain in place only in a minority of markets such as Germany, Poland, Romania, Bulgaria, Czechia and Slovenia,” Ruby told EURACTIV.Half of coal power capacity was replaced by renewables, whose share rose to 34.6% of total electricity generation, a new record high. The other half was replaced by natural gas, a fossil fuel which spews about 50% less carbon than coal when burned in power plants.2019 might also have marked a decisive turning point. For the first time, wind and solar power plants in the EU delivered more electricity than coal-fired power plants taken together, the report found.[Frédéric Simon]More: Power shift: EU coal output falls 24% in 2019last_img read more

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Morgan Stanley: 47GW of U.S. coal capacity to be uneconomic by 2024

first_imgMorgan Stanley: 47GW of U.S. coal capacity to be uneconomic by 2024 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC sees a $64 billion spending opportunity on top of double-digit earnings accretion for more than a dozen utilities that decide to retire uneconomic coal plants and replace them with cheaper renewables by 2025.“We compared the costs of operating each coal plant against our state-by-state forecasts of renewables costs across 13 stocks and identified [47,000 MW] of coal capacity that will become more expensive than renewables by 2024,” Morgan Stanley analysts wrote in a recent research report. “We estimate this represents a capex opportunity of [$64 billion] and earnings accretion for the stocks we cover of up to 14% in 2025.”The report, “The Second Wave of Clean Energy — Part II: Who Can Ride the Wave?” follows a December 2019 report in which the research firm forecast that about 70,000 MW to as much as 190,000 MW of coal-fired generation is “economically at risk” from the deployment of a “second wave of renewables” in the U.S. The research firm said these projections exclude about 24,000 MW of coal generation already set to shut down.“We think that the economics make sense that the utilities in general should be pursuing this just because it seems to benefit everybody,” Morgan Stanley analyst Stephen Byrd said in a Feb. 11 phone interview. “It benefits shareholders, customers and the planet.”Ameren Corp., American Electric Power Co. Inc., Duke Energy Corp. and Pinnacle West Capital Corp. are seen as best positioned to take advantage of a second wave of clean energy.[Darren Sweeney]More ($): Morgan Stanley: $64B capex upside for utilities replacing coal with renewableslast_img read more

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Race Ahead: Goodwill Mud Run

first_imgThe Goodwill Mud Run in Greenville, South Carolina, presented by St. Francis Sports Medicine is a 3.5-mile challenge run with 35 obstacles, where teams compete against each other in an officially timed event, April 12-13, 2014The Mud Run/Obstacle Course race takes place at the SC-TAC (formerly Donaldson Center)Start Time is 7 a.m. and up to 4,000 individuals may register.Visit goodwillmudrun.org for more information and to register.Registration:2 Person Team (Saturday Only) 3 Divisions – $1004 Person Team (Divisions A-F) – $140JROTC Team (this is for JROTC high school teams) – $90.00Obstacle Course InformationPlease see the Course Map and familiarize yourself with the Obstacle Rules to prepare yourself for taking on the Goodwill Mud Run course. In an effort to create a fair playing field for participants, course previews or practice runs are strictly prohibited. Trespassing on the Goodwill Mud Run Obstacle Course opens up participants to the potential for injury and places Goodwill Industries in a position to withhold a team from racing.Wear clothing that you don’t mind throwing away. Organizers recommend participants wear pants that fasten tightly as drawstring shorts and pants tend to get stuck and come off in the mud. A running, trail or some form of hiking shoe/boot is recommended. You cannot run barefooted and NO flip flop or slip-on sport shoe will be allowed. Some participants find it helpful to duct tape their shoes to their feet.Kid ZoneThe Kid Zone is open to children ages 4 and up. Parents/guardians must sign a waiver for their children to run through the Kid’s Zone course. A Kid’s Zone participant does not receive an event t-shirt with registration.T-Shirt & Costume ContestThe Goodwill Mud Run has a separate T-shirt and Costume contests. Let the photographers at the registration table know your team would like to enter either contest and at that time they will take your picture. Goodwill Mud Run race organizers will vote on the contest entries the week after the event. The winning team from each contest will win $150; Runner-up team in each category will receive $100. Have fun, but please keep t-shirt designs and costumes “family friendly.”Race Contact: Paul J. Callahan; [email protected]; 864-351-0123To see more, check out some of the videos on YouTube.GMR Logo_Fall 2011last_img read more

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Kayak Fishing: The Best of Both Worlds

first_imgWhether you are a seasoned kayaker looking for a new dimension to your passion or an angler looking for an extra edge, exploring this natural combination of kayaking and fishing is an exciting and rewarding venture.There are numerous important tactical advantages of going after fish from aboard a kayak. Stealth is arguably the most important. Just as wildlife above the water’s surface tolerates your presence as you glide by, fish in the water are similarly undisturbed.“As long as the kayak angler is mindful,” seasoned kayak fisherman Richie Bekolay says, “they can paddle right up to fish without them having any idea.” Bekolay, a Pro Staff Angler with Johnson Outdoors and Werner Paddles, started fishing from a kayak after moving to Hampton Roads, Va., just a few years ago. He saw kayak fishermen paddling under the bridge at the Hampton Roads Bridge Tunnel in the middle of the night. “That’s cool,” he said. “I want to do that!” He bought his first kayak soon thereafter and immediately started fishing from it.The nature of kayaks, which can maneuver in very little water, can put them in places that bigger boats could never access. Navigating shallow tidal tributaries with vegetation growing to just below the surface without a kayak is virtually impossible. Big redfish can be found in flats with water less than a foot deep. And even deeper water is sometimes rendered inaccessible to larger boats. “I have fished for bass in areas that are a couple feet in depth, but littered with submerged wood just inches below the surface,” Bekolay said. “Bass boats can only dream of getting into some of those areas.”To access good fishing spots by boat, you have to first get that boat in the water. And this is another area where those with kayaks have a huge advantage. Concrete boat ramps are not required when you fish from a kayak. “The options are endless when it comes to launches,” Bekolay said. “You can slide in off a frontage road, drag it through the woods, navigate through little feeder creeks or launch (with permission, of course) from somebody’s backyard.”Once you are on the water fishing, you might notice other, less tangible advantages. Rob Choi, avid kayak angler and blogger at angling-addict.com, likes how the pace associated with being self-propelled actually improves efficiency. “It forces the angler to slow things down and really focus,” he said. “You can’t jump around from spot to spot quickly. It makes us plan things better.”Richie Bekolay finds being closer to the water and the fish both therapeutic and exciting. “You’re more in tune with your surroundings and all that Mother Nature offers,” he said. “Then, when you hook into a big fish, it turns from peaceful into hand-to-hand combat. You get the biggest adrenaline rush when that big fish is thrashing at the side of the kayak. Honestly, there is nothing on this planet for me that can beat that.”And on those days when the bad news is the fish aren’t biting, the good news is you’re out on the water enjoying nature in a kayak. That’s not to say kayak fishermen aren’t serious about fishing, because many of them are among the most passionate anglers out there. But there’s something about being on a kayak that can turn even a bad fishing day into a good outing. Even the most hardcore anglers occasionally have to turn a day of fishing into a “photo day” when the fish aren’t biting. “Being silent and in the water, it’s definitely nice to be able to creep up on photo opportunities when fishing isn’t productive,” Choi said.Keith Hendrickson, pro staff angler for Native Watercraft, keeps things in perspective. “When the fish aren’t biting, remember to kick back, stick your feet in the water, and drift,” he said. “And remember, it’s called fishing, not catching.”—Ed FelkerNine Favorite Spots to Wet a LineUpper PotomacFrom the confluence of the Shenandoah and Potomac Rivers at Harpers Ferry, downstream to the Point of Rocks bridge, the Potomac is relatively scenic, wide, and fairly slow during summer flows. Many businesses along this stretch rent kayaks for those wanting to try before they buy. Smallmouth, carp, catfish, and panfish can all be found here in great numbers. —Ed FelkerShenandoahThe Shenandoah River has countless public access points on the North Fork, South Fork and Main Stem. You can’t go wrong with any section of the river. Deep sections below Front Royal contain large smallmouth bass as well as the fish of 10,000 casts…the muskie. —Jeff SingletonRappahannockUnload and put in at the bridge in Remington. You will not be able to park but you can pull off the road long enough to unload. It’s a 4.5-mile trip from Remington to Kelly’s Ford. The last mile is nothing but rock garden. Focus your fishing time in the first 3-3 ½ miles and on the deeper pockets. If the water is low (below 3’ on the Remington gauge) be prepared to drag your kayak through the rock garden. —Jeff SingletonBull Run/Occoquan CreekLaunching at Rt. 28 at the Prince William/Fairfax county line will send you 8.5 miles to Bull Run Marina and another 5 miles down to Fountainhead Regional Park on Occoquan reservoir. In the first 3.5 miles you will find largemouth, smallmouth, catfish, carp, and panfish while quickly covering the moving water. Not long after you pass under the railroad tracks Bull Run opens up and becomes still. All of this is within 30 miles of DC, incredible scenery and plenty of large fish on this tranquil trip. —Jeff SingletonVirginia/Maryland Potomac tributariesMattawoman Creek is a versatile fishery that even a beginner can enjoy. Watch the tide chart. If you put in at Slavins boat ramp when the tide is incoming, you can almost effortlessly paddle upstream and reach hidden alcoves and feeder creeks for great largemouth bass and northern snakehead fishing. During the summer months, take advantage of casting a top water frog or popper into the lilly pads and hydrilla, and you will be sure to hook into something. Afterwards, catch the outgoing tide for a leisurely float back downstream to return to the boat launch.—Kodi BowersWest Virginia: Potomac River/Smoke Hole CanyonThis is one of the most beautiful floats you will ever experience. With a chance to catch smallmouth bass as well as trout, catching 60+ smallies is typical. The scenery will not disappoint if the fishing is bad, with unparalleled views. Launch at big bend campground and take out at Royal Glenn Rd for a peaceful two-day float. This is typically only accessible by canoe or kayak. —Kodi BowersNorth Carolina: The North Toe RiverThis is my favorite for easy access, quality fishing, and paddling. It has some rapids but nothing you can’t carry your boat around (above the gorge, of course). —Keith HendricksonNorth Carolina: The French BroadThe French Broad has good fishing and sections you can float without getting out of your boat. Plus you can pull over and get a beer or BBQ sandwich. —Keith HendricksonNorth Carolina: The Broad RiverThe Broad near Shelby has good fishing and easy paddling. If you put in above Cliffside Power plant (which is the float I recommend), you have to portage around a low head dam but it’s easy. —Keith Hendricksonlast_img read more

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Belize Defense Force Provides Crash Course In Jungle Warfare To U.S. Marines

first_imgBy Dialogo April 20, 2010 Marines and Sailors of Company F, 2nd Battalion, 23rd Marine Regiment received introductory training in jungle warfare tactics and survival from the Belize Defense Force Apr. 14 during Tradewinds 2010. Tradewinds ‘10, is Chairman of the Joint Chiefs directed, U.S. Southern Command sponsored annual exercise designed to improve cooperation with 15 Caribbean Basin partner nations in responding to regional security threats. The Marines and two Sailors who are corpsmen, had no prior training in any other type of warfare training other than desert operations and military operations on urban terrain. For the first week of the exercise the 30 student Marines and sailors of Co. F are dedicating most of their time to the classroom. But on Apr. 16 the Marines will begin a week in the jungle along the Guatemalan border to put their classroom training to the test; hacking their way with Machetes through Belizean shrub and adapting to mother nature’s pests including dangerous insects, venomous snakes, and other natural obstacles. The Marines will be in full proper protective equipment and sporting a pack weighing up to 40 lbs., full of essential supplies, food, and water. The students who are training under the close supervision of BDF Staff Sgt. Rady Puc, a jungle warfare instructor with training company, has over 15 years experience in giving students under him the necessary knowledge in jungle operations and survival. “In the Belizean Army, our initial course for jungle tactics is six weeks long,” said Puc. “[This] is a shorter version of the course, and we are covering just as much.” Outside of classroom instruction, the students observed as BDF soldiers conducted patrols and engaged mock enemy forces in nearby, thick vegetation similar to the jungle environment the Marines will face later this week. The Marines then mimicked the BDF soldiers and conducted their own mock patrols and dummy enemy contact, with adjustments from Puc and other Belizean soldiers in between. “Different countries armies do different things to prepare for the jungle,” explained Puc. The Marines I trained before adjusted very quickly once they actually got out there.” Puc, who has trained another Marine unit in the past, added it typically takes years for Belizean soldiers to master the appropriate skills needed to survive in a jungle environment all while keeping a combat mindset and maintaining vigilance of the enemy. “A week in the jungle is a piece of cake for a Belizean soldier,” said Puc. “The Marines will struggle at first, but jungle warfare isn’t easily learned by anybody.” The Marines ranging from private first class to sergeant, some who have served combat tours in Iraq and others who are just a few weeks out of the Marine school of infantry, bring different levels of experience to the training. “This jungle warfare training is good, well-rounded training,” said Lance Cpl. Robert Fishbourne, a machine gunner with Co. F, 2/23, weapons platoon, who already completed one tour in Iraq. “It’s definitely different from other training we have received, but these guys (Belizean soldiers) are really good so it’s another beneficial weapon to add to our unit’s arsenal.” The week long classroom preparation will end April 15. Some Marines are going into the jungle confident, while others are more worried about the simpler things the jungle has to offer. “I’ll do fine,” said Fishbourne. “I’m more worried about waking up next to a snake or with some kind of critter crawling on me.”last_img read more

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