LEN launches low-income housing project in Linden

first_img– Commissions first model homeThe Linden Enterprise Network (LEN) of Region 10 (Upper Demerara-Berbice) has launched the Region 10 Low Income Housing Project with the commissioning of its first model home at Amelia’s Ward, Mackenzie on Thursday.The home, which costs approximately $3.5 million, is the first of its kind in the bauxite mining community to be constructed with bauxite overburden as one of its main constituent materials. The blocks are made from that material, which is normally considered a waste product.LEN is expected to collaborate with the Central Housing and Planning Authority (CHPA) and banking institutions to provide more of this type of home to low income earners.The home was commissioned with the ceremonial cutting of the ribbon during a simple ceremony at which Linden Mayor Waneka Arindell said it was a privilege to see the level of creativity coming out of Linden and Region 10.“With the Government’s sustainable development cities and towns, this is one of the things and ideas to have this type of work done… I want to encourage LEN to continue to support these innovations,” Mayor Arindell noted, as she urged banks to continue assisting young people with housing loans.Speaking on behalf of the Minister within the Ministry of Communities, Valerie Adams-Yearwood, Technical Assistant to that Minister, Remington Nelson, said it is common knowledge that Guyana as a whole, and Linden in particular, has a huge housing deficit, and the people that are mostly affected are those in the lower income bracket, including public servants.She further stated that many young people cannot even qualify to obtain loans at commercial banks.“It is a problem for which we need a solution… Not only is this LEN’s low income housing project a welcome contribution to Government’s efforts to provide affordable housing, it also illustrates that the solutions we seek may be found where we least expect — right in our house, so to speak,” he said.Quoting from the minister’s speech, Nelson said the project demonstrates innovation, imagination, ingenuity and initiative. He said the project has also provided jobs, will provide low income homes, and is useful in finding housing solutions.“We are transforming useless bauxite overburden into valuable building blocks to provide homes for families at a reduced cost…the LEN low income housing project shows initiative at work…let this project stand as a beacon of inspiration as to what can be accomplished when, instead of looking to someone else to solve your problem, you can ask yourself, ‘What do I have in my possession?’ “, Nelson posited.LEN Chairman, Orin Gordon, in his address, also highlighted the project’s ingenuity, and noted that what is considered waste product is now being used to construct homes.He said 100 percent of the materials were derived from within, and bought from suppliers and contractors in, Region 10. The spanking new home has as its main features 2 bedrooms, a kitchen, and sitting room.last_img read more

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Angels Gate Park ideas to continue coming at 3rd forum

first_imgBy Donna Littlejohn STAFF WRITER An American Indian cultural art museum and martial arts classes will be among ideas advanced Saturday at the third – and final – meeting to help create a blueprint for Angels Gate Park in San Pedro. The forum is designed to solicit community suggestions for ways to breathe new life into the 64-acre hillside park overlooking the ocean at Gaffey Street and Paseo del Mar. It also would provide a spot for meditation, according to Jacob Gutierrez of the Tongva/Pipiimar Dolphin Nation. John Funmaker of the Iron Circle Nation, meanwhile, wants to establish an American Indian cultural art museum while also supporting existing open views and planning for more trees, native plants, birds and animals on the land. The Iron Circle Nation already uses Angels Gate Park for its annual Many Winters Gathering of the Elders. In addition, the group would like to hold regular sweat lodge ceremonies, an annual “Sobriety Red Road Retreat” and an American Indian spiritual/cultural retreat, and possibly sponsor campgrounds on the park. The Kaizan Foundation wants to establish the Ikkyu Dojo at Angels Gate, a program in conjunction with the Angels Gate Cultural Center that would extend the center’s existing martial arts program, showcase the Japanese influences in the port area and incorporate a Zen garden with indigenous vegetation. Barbara Dye of the Palos Verdes Peninsula Land Conservancy will give a presentation on habitat restoration for some of the park’s slopes where no other uses are planned. Stephanie Rizzi of Hostel International will talk about the importance of keeping and cultivating the existing youth hostel in Angels Gate Park. The hostel provides affordable accommodations and cultural exchange opportunities for visitors of all ages coming to Los Angeles from throughout the world. Nathan Birnbaum, executive director of the Angels Gate Cultural Center, will talk about expanding the center’s educational programming to provide weekday classes for schoolchildren and weekend family events centered around exhibits, performances and park exploration activities. Included are proposals for an eatery inside the park so visitors can have lunch, dinner, or just snacks and coffee during their excursions. “Community reflections” will be presented by San Pedro community leaders Doug Epperhart and June Burlingame Smith, who want to make sure that any ideas ultimately approved for Angels Gate Park will take in a broad and practical spectrum of park uses. “This really is an opportunity to work together to do something good,” Epperhart said. “The criteria is getting the greatest good for the greatest number, for maximum public use. ? This is a public facility, it does not belong to any particular group. I’m much more interested in seeing as much access and use by as many people as possible as opposed to carving it up into 10 different kingdoms. “I don’t mind leaving a lot of the park as a blank slate for now.” [email protected] 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! A local steering committee overseeing the effort hopes to have a draft master plan to present to the community by mid-November, with a final version to be submitted to the city of Los Angeles by the end of December. Two previous forums have included advocates for sports fields; a swimming pool; horseshoe pits and shuffle board courts; an off-leash dog park; a public middle school specializing in ecology, art, music and history; a skateboard facility; Asian-themed gardens with a restaurant; Korean-American cultural exhibit; military history landmarks; and an American Indian cultural and environmental education center with workshops. Saturday’s meeting featuring the last set of presenters will be held from 10 a.m. to noon at the Angels Gate Cultural Center in the park and will feature 10-minute talks from seven groups. In one of two presentations advocating American Indian interests, a “Gathering-Friendship Circle” will be proposed for the space just below the Korean Friendship Bell. The spot would serve as a memorial for “all those that departed this life to the next,” presenters said in a written summary. “Some of our elders have stated this was a location of a massacre of our people when our people were pushed to their death off these beautiful cliffs.” last_img read more

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