Hamptons agent Yorgos Tsibiridis jumps to Compass

first_img Tags Email Address* Share via Shortlink Tsibiridis was previously at Corcoran. At Compass he will continue working in the Hamptons.Hamptons agents have been busy through the pandemic, which triggered a frenzy of renting and buying in weekend and summer communities outside New York City.The median home sale price in the Hamptons was $1.4 million in the fourth quarter, nearly 55 percent higher than a year earlier, according to a report by Douglas Elliman. The number of homes sold also rose, to 803, the highest quarterly total in 15 years.Contact Sasha Jones Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Yorgos TsibiridisYorgos Tsibiridis, Douglas Elliman’s top agent in East Hampton, has moved to Compass.Over his eight-year career, including the past six at Elliman, Tsibiridis has sold over $400 million in homes from the Hamptons to the Greek Islands. In the past 12 months he counts over $70 million in sales and contracts.“In the back of my mind, I was always thinking, ‘How can I do things better? How can I serve my customers better? How can I move on into the next level?’ And that’s when the idea of Compass came on board,” Tsibiridis said.He said the move was inspired by Compass’ branding, technology and support for its agents.Fueled by an infusion of capital from SoftBank and other investors, Compass has been aggressively recruiting brokers from other firms for several years. Some who signed on but became disillusioned with the brokerage have found that clauses in their contracts would obligate them to repay large sums of money to depart, The Real Deal reported last week. Compass points out that clawback provisions are common in the brokerage industry.Read moreMDLNY’s Kirsten Jordan heads back to Elliman from CompassSuburban home inventory is depleted, but demand ragesLong Island home sales spike in Q4 Full Name* Message* compassDouglas EllimanEast Hamptonhamptons-weeklyThe Hamptonslast_img read more

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American Academy elects 20 faculty

first_imgTwenty from Harvard are among the 212 new members elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, one of the nation’s most prestigious honorary societies and a leading center for independent policy research. Members contribute to academy studies of science and technology policy, global security, social policy, and American institutions, the humanities, and education.Since its founding in 1780 by John Adams, James Bowdoin, John Hancock, and other scholar-patriots, the academy has elected leading “thinkers and doers” from each generation, including George Washington and Benjamin Franklin in the 18th century, Daniel Webster and Ralph Waldo Emerson in the 19th, and Albert Einstein and Winston Churchill in the 20th. The current membership includes more than 250 Nobel laureates and more than 60 Pulitzer Prize winners.Among the 2011 class of scholars, scientists, writers, and artists, and civic, corporate, and philanthropic leaders are winners of the Nobel, Pulitzer, and Pritzker Prizes; the Turing Award; MacArthur and Guggenheim fellowships; Kennedy Center Honors; and Grammy, Golden Globe, and Academy awards.The new class will be inducted at an Oct. 1 ceremony at the academy’s headquarters in Cambridge, Mass.The fellows from Harvard follow:James Ireland Cash Jr., James E. Robison Professor of Business Administration Emeritus, Harvard Business SchoolTimothy J. Colton, Morris and Anna Feldberg Professor of Government and Russian StudiesDavid Paul Corey, professor of neurobiology, Harvard Medical SchoolGeorge Q. Daley, professor of biological chemistry and molecular pharmacology; professor of pediatrics, Harvard Medical SchoolPhilip A. Fisher, Felice Crowl Reid Professor of EnglishJulio Frenk, dean of the Harvard School of Public Health; T & G Angelopoulos Professor of Public Health and International DevelopmentAnnette Gordon-Reed, professor of law; Carol Pforzheimer Professor at the Radcliffe Institute; professor of history in the Faculty of Arts and SciencesDaniel Arie Haber, Kurt J. Isselbacher/Peter B. Schwartz Professor of Oncology, Harvard Medical SchoolRobert F. Higgins, senior lecturer of business administration, Harvard Business SchoolJay Harold Jasanoff, Diebold Professor of Indo-European Linguistics and PhilologyFarish Alston Jenkins Jr., professor of biology and curator of vertebrate paleontology; Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology; professor of anatomyAlex S. Jones, director of the Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy; Laurence M. Lombard Lecturer in the Press and Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy SchoolFrances Myra Kamm, Littauer Professor of Philosophy and Public Policy, professor of philosophy, Harvard Kennedy SchoolThomas Forrest Kelly, Morton B. Knafel Professor of MusicRobert E. Kingston, professor of genetics, Harvard Medical SchoolDavid Laibson, Robert I. Goldman Professor of EconomicsLouis Menand, Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of EnglishW. Jason Morgan, visiting scholar, Department of Earth and Planetary SciencesMichael R. Van Valkenburgh, Charles Eliot Professor in Practice of Landscape Architecture, Harvard Graduate School of DesignDaniel Martin Wegner, John Lindsley Professor of Psychology in Memory of William JamesFor a complete list of the new academy members.last_img read more

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T-Time: Swann won’t last his desired 10 years

first_imgEveryone was also shocked, caught offguard and taken by surprise when they found out Swann still had a job in the wake of recent events. (Also why use basically the same, identical and alike phrase three times in a row? I mean it’s not like he was trying to reach a word count, but I digress.) But in March, the water polo program went from national powerhouse to national embarrassment. Legendary coach Jovan Vavic (of both the men’s and women’s teams) was indicted for allegedly taking bribes to lie about recruits in the now-infamous, Aunt Becky Admissions Scandal. The school fired Vavic immediately, ending his 16-time national championship tenure. So much for Swann’s crown jewel. Not all of the aforementioned scandals or mishaps are directly Swann’s fault. But he certainly bears responsibility for the admissions disaster. His department clearly lacked oversight over athlete admissions and failed to properly vet recruits. Swann’s response to the scandal was more uninspiring than a Steve Sarkisian speech at a booster event. Last fall, USC football’s downward spiral culminated in the program’s first losing season since 2000. Even the undermanned, bowl-banned Trojans under Lane Kiffin never finished worse than a 7-6 record. Yet, Swann voiced his support for Helton following the trainwreck of the season, likely saving face after extending Helton’s contract until 2023 the previous offseason. Yet under Athletic Director Lynn Swann, who took up the mantle from Pat Haden in April 2016, there’s been scandal after scandal after scandal in USC Athletics — and few victories to match. Of course, USC football and basketball don’t make up the entire athletic department (even though they bring in most of the dough). USC’s men’s and women’s water polo teams have been the crown jewels of Swann’s tenure. The women’s team has won two of the last three national championships and the men’s team took one home last fall. Swann also told the Times that he wanted to be USC’s athletic director for the next 10 years. For an administrator whose hardly gone 10 minutes without a public relations nightmare, I’d pump the brakes a bit. The athletics department looked to be righting the ship, making a move to hire wunderkind Kliff Kingsbury as offensive coordinator. But of course, all those glitters would never coach for the cardinal and gold. Kingsbury left quickly after to become the Arizona Cardinals’ head coach. The Cardinals only had to pay USC a $150,000 buyout to land Kingsbury. I’d like to think they asked Swann, “Cash or check?” No scandals. That should be the primary job requirement for the athletic director of the University of Southern California. He or she can be a member of the Trojan Family or have never set foot on Trousdale Parkway. They just need to avoid the dreaded “s-word” that seems to plague the University at every turn. In 2017, USC basketball embarrassingly lost in the second round of the National Invitational Tournament. This was perhaps understandable, as the team was coming off as a major snub from the NCAA Tournament. But this season, USC missed the tournament for the second consecutive year with no argument for getting to the Big Dance. And not to mention — former assistant coach Tony Bland pled guilty to bribery and wire fraud in January, basically admitting he facilitated payments to recruits. The NCAA has yet to punish schools involved in that scandal, but they will. And when they do? Yeesh. “I think everybody was blindsided by this,” Swann said to the Los Angeles Times. “The fact that it was a senior member of the staff and also our men’s and women’s head water polo coach. … These are people that have been here a long time and people who had been here during difficult times. Everyone was completely shocked, caught offguard and taken by surprise.” When Swann took over after Haden’s resignation in 2016, the program had successfully moved beyond NCAA sanctions stemming from the Reggie Bush, pay-for-play scandal. At the time, the program’s biggest embarrassment was retaining Sarkesian after he spoke drunkenly at that booster event in August 2016. Now the department is staring sanctions straight in the face, from multiple incidents, and they’ve almost all happened under Swann’s purview. Trevor Denton is a junior writing about sports. His column, “T-Time,” runs every other Wednesday.last_img read more

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