Press release: Online guides will help renters and leaseholders to know their rights

first_img Social media – MHCLG Media enquiries Email [email protected] Office address and general enquiries 2 Marsham StreetLondonSW1P 4DF Contact form https://forms.communit… If your enquiry is related to COVID-19 please check our guidance page first before you contact us – https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance-for-local-government.If you still need to contact us please use the contact form above to get in touch, because of coronavirus (COVID-19). If you send it by post it will not receive a reply within normal timescale. Twitter – https://twitter.com/mhclgFlickr – http://www.flickr.com/photos/mhclgLinkedIn – http://www.linkedin.com/company/mhclg Landlords, leaseholders and tenants will be armed with vital information on their rights and responsibilities thanks to new online rental guides published by the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government today (26 June 2018).These guides form a key part of government’s continuing crackdown on poor practice by a minority of landlords and agents in the private rented and leasehold sectors. Evidence shows that Citizens Advice helped 65,000 private renters with more than 100,000 problems about their tenancy in 2017.As part of government’s commitment to ensure everyone has a decent, safe place to live, the ‘how to’ guides include checklists for new and existing tenants, landlords and letting agents to ensure they are complying with their legal responsibilities.Published on GOV.UK today the guides have been produced in partnership with landlord, tenant and letting and managing agent groups, professional bodies and local housing authorities and aim to drive up living standards in the sector.The ‘how to’ series comprises:How to letThis new guide will help private landlords learn more about their key legal responsibilities and best practice when letting a property, including how to protect tenancy deposits, carry out gas safety checks and install smoke and carbon dioxide alarms.How to leaseBy reading this new document, leaseholders can learn about their unique set of rights and responsibilities. For example, a managing agent or landlord could be responsible for running a leaseholder’s block or estate – but the leaseholder does have a say in how they do it.How to rent a safe homeThis document will help current and prospective tenants identify potential unsafe conditions in rented properties. It gives tenants an overview of the most common hazards to look out for in rented properties, including gas and electrical safety, damp and mould and trips and falls hazards, and how they should report dangerous conditions.How to rentThis updated guide provides a step-by-step process to renting privately. Tenants can learn how to challenge poor practice and understand private landlords’ legal obligations. It is a legal requirement for all landlords to provide their tenants with this document.Housing Minister Heather Wheeler MP said: The guides will be reviewed in light of any new legislation to ensure tenants, landlords and leaseholders are supplied with up-to-date information.Further informationGovernment is committed to protecting the rights of tenants and giving them more security. We will shortly be launching a consultation seeking views on the benefits and barriers to landlords offering longer and more secure tenancies in the private rented sector.We have already announced our intention to require private landlords to belong to a redress scheme, and that we will require all letting agents to be regulated and belong to a client money protection scheme in order to practice.Our consultation on ways to make redress more accessible and effective across housing closed on 16 April and we will issue a response in due course. Please use this number if you are a journalist wishing to speak to Press Office 0303 444 1209 Every day across the country thousands of people move house – from young people leaving home for the first time, to those relocating after years in the same property. Whatever the circumstance, we want to ensure renters, landlords and leaseholders are armed with information so they know their rights, responsibilities and can challenge poor behaviour. General enquiries: please use this number if you are a member of the public 030 3444 0000last_img read more

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Colombia Has Seized 16 Drug ‘Submarines’ In 3 Years

first_imgBy Dialogo April 07, 2011 In three years, Colombia has succeeded in intercepting sixteen submersible vessels or ‘submarines’ used to carry tons of cocaine across the Pacific Ocean to the coasts of Central America and Mexico, the commandant of that country’s navy said on 5 April. “We’ve developed systems that enable us to detect them; for this reason, we trapped nine in 2009, three in 2010, and four so far this year,” Adm. Alvaro Echandía told the press at the Twenty-Eighth International Drug Enforcement Conference in Cancún, in eastern Mexico. The Colombian military commander indicated that in building each of these vessels, which generally navigate a few meters below the surface of the water, drug traffickers invest an average of around two million dollars. “But using them, they can move shipments of eight to twelve tons” of drugs, making the investment very profitable, he noted. The officer said that in view of the increased surveillance carried out by Colombia in order to intercept these vessels, the cartels are seeking to build them in other countries. “In July, one was found in Ecuador,” he indicated. During the inaugural session of the conference, in which representatives from more than a hundred countries are participating, the director of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), Michele Leonhart, mentioned that at least two drug submarines were found in Ecuador in the last year, a fact she offered as evidence of the anti-drug cooperation among the Colombian, Ecuadorean, and U.S. authorities. According to United Nations reports, up to 69% of the more than six hundred tons of cocaine sent from Colombia to the United States travels by sea across the Pacific Ocean, following the imposition of increasingly strict surveillance in the Caribbean Sea.last_img read more

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Let’s answer all of Jacoby Brissett’s oddball Twitter questions

first_imgHere’s an explanation from Gizmodo:These days, footballs are typically made from cowhide or vulcanized rubber, making their nickname “pigskins” somewhat ironic. Football fans often perpetuate the idea that footballs used to be made of pigskin, which is how they got their nickname, but it turns out this isn’t the case.In fact, “pigskins” were originally made out of animal bladders — sometimes the bladder of a pig, which is thought to be how the moniker “pigskin” came about. Animal bladders were much more accessible to the average team than more expensive items like leather. When the bladder was inflated, it was mostly round and served well as a ball for gameplay.So one answer to Brissett’s question would be the bladder, as footballs used to be made from a pig’s bladder. But that was long ago. And as Big Game notes, using pig bladders resulted in bad footballs: “Straw and other material would oftentimes be stuffed in the pig bladder instead, but this tended to create balls with lumps and strange shapes that made official game play difficult.”The invention of vulcanized rubber in the 1860s helped change footballs into what you see today. Colts quarterback Jacoby Brissett is interested in a lot of things, and is asking his Twitter followers for help.Over the past week, Brissett has been having morning thoughts on various topics. It has led to some hilarious interactions. But while some may mock Brissett’s curiosity, he’s actually asking some interesting questions. So, we thought we’d help Brissett out and find the answers he’s been looking for. Let’s go through his questions one by one.MORE: Ranking each NFL team’s potential Hall of Famers on current rosterThe water glass questionIf you drink water out a cup do you still have to wash the cup? Asking for a friend— Jacoby Brissett (@JBrissett12) July 9, 2019An interesting thought.After all, as Brissett points out, you’re just washing your water cup with water. So is there really any benefit to cleaning it?But you’re going to clean it with water right ?— Jacoby Brissett (@JBrissett12) July 9, 2019An article on prevention.com goes into detail about this question. They even spoke with a professional on the matter. In short, it really depends on who is using the cup. If you’re by yourself, it’s not overly harmful to just keep using the bottle over and over. But if you share the bottle with someone, then you start getting into some issues.”The more people who use that same cup, the greater the probability that one of those people carry bacteria that might make you sick,” Dr. Aaron Margolin, a professor of microbiology at the University of New Hampshire, told the website.It also matters what kind of cup you’re drinking out of. A glass cup is fine, but a plastic cup is much more likely to collect bacteria. In conclusion: “If you restrict the usage of the cup to a single individual and you make sure that the water is clean, then you are not going to get sick if you use the same cup over and over.”The space questionIf the sun is hot how is outer space cold ?— Jacoby Brissett (@JBrissett12) July 10, 2019This question received the most attention, as it currently sits at more than 38,000 likes on Twitter.Steelers quarterback Josh Dobbs was happy to answer this one for Brissett. A Tennessee graduate with a degree in aerospace engineering, Dobbs took astronautics, propulsion and an aerodynamics class during his senior year — so he knows a thing or two about space and the atmosphere.He explained the answer to Brissett and it ended in a hilarious response from the Colts QB. A post shared by Sporting News (@sportingnews) on Jul 11, 2019 at 5:35am PDTObviously, Dobbs didn’t mean a literal vacuum.Here’s how Britannica defines a vacuum as it relates to space:Vacuum, space in which there is no matter or in which the pressure is so low that any particles in the space do not affect any processes being carried on there. It is a condition well below normal atmospheric pressure and is measured in units of pressure (the pascal). A vacuum can be created by removing air from a space using a vacuum pump or by reducing the pressure using a fast flow of fluid, as in Bernoulli’s principle.Or if you want a simpler definition, one of Brissett’s followers offered an easy-to-understand answer:Space is a vacuum with very little matter to retain heat. We feel the sun’s heat because the air, ground and water retain it and radiate it.— Hobbes (@JohnQuinnPublic) July 10, 2019The pigskin questionWhich part of the pig’s skin is actually a football ?— Jacoby Brissett (@JBrissett12) July 11, 2019A solid question, but footballs actually aren’t made of pig’s skin. View this post on Instagramlast_img read more

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