Cornish Bakery gets CBILS loan from Clydesdale Bank

first_imgThe Cornish Bakery has secured £1m funding through the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS) from Clydesdale Bank.All 45 of the business’ bakeries closed their doors to customers on 23 March, with all but seven of its 400-strong team furloughed.The loan, The Cornish Bakery said, would allow it to ensure there was adequate cash flow to reopen the doors in the coming weeks, as well as fund new health and safety procedures including providing staff with protective clothing – such as masks and visors – and introducing new Perspex screens around all customer counters.By the end of June, the bakery hoped to unfurlough all staff and reopen all sites, except for those based at the National Exhibition Centre, without having to make any redundancies. It sait it was even looking to make additional hires to see it through the summer season.In addition, the loan has given The Cornish Bakery the chance to launch an online mail order and click-and-collect service.“The loan provided by Clydesdale Bank will allow us to quickly reintroduce cash flow into the business to allow us to become operational again,” said The Cornish Bakery founder Steve Grocutt.“Our hopes now are to not only to return the business to normal but, hopefully, grow the business through these new revenue streams and, in time, through acquisition. We are incredibly positive about the future of the business.”Stewart Linnane, relationship manager at Clydesdale Bank, owned by Virgin Money UK, said The Cornish Bakery was one of the first companies to approach it.“Within two weeks, the business had received both the application approval and had the full amount transferred into its accounts.”He added that Covid-19 meant time was of the essence, particularly as businesses were still incurring costs even though they were closed. However, it has also presented some opportunities, allowing businesses to diversify and future-proof in challenging market environments.“Those businesses that have seen success during the pandemic to date are those with e-commerce functions. We are proud to be able to support The Cornish Bakery in helping to secure that positive future.”A recent survey by British Baker found that 8% of respondents had applied for CBILS, while 46% sought help through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.last_img read more

Read More →

Intelligence

first_imgCAPTION: Czech Railways has received the first series-built Class 943 driving trailers and Class 043 centre cars from MSV Studenka to operate with its Class 843 diesel-electric railcars. The 11 driving and 20 non-driving cars are all due to be delivered by the end of this yearCAPTION: Thorn Transit Systems International has completed a prototype touch-screen ticket vending machine for Kuala Lumpur’s automated metro. Putra has ordered 119 TVMs, which will issue two types of recyclable magnetic ticketslast_img

Read More →

UK Should Set Up Floating Wind Funding Pot – Report

first_imgThe UK Government should use the Contracts for Difference (CfD) auction framework to create a specific pot of funding for innovative technologies like floating wind, according to a report released by RenewableUK and Scottish Renewables.This will secure an increase in new capacity from 32MW now to up to 2GW by 2030, making floating wind cost-competitive by that date, according to the report, Floating Wind – The UK Industry Ambition”.The report also calls for potential sites to be made available all around the UK, and for the UK government and the industry to invest jointly in new infrastructure supporting the development of floating wind at part of the UK’s Industrial Strategy. A clear pipeline of commercial-scale projects will bring about cost reduction through economies of scale, the report said. The ScotWind leasing process provides an opportunity for the development of floating wind in Scottish waters.Floating wind is also necessary for the UK to reach its legally-binding net-zero carbon emissions target by 2050 and to fulfil Scotland’s commitment to achieve this by 2045, the report said.The industry estimates that floating wind can support 17,000 UK jobs by 2050, particularly in coastal communities in England, Scotland and Wales, delivering GBP 33.6 billion of economic activity (GVA). This represents a return of GBP 15 for each GBP 1 invested in early stage support.The report highlights the fact that, thanks to UK’s global lead in this innovative technology, the UK is in a unique position to export floating wind worldwide to emerging markets with deep-water coastlines, like China, Japan, Norway, Portugal, South Korea, Spain, Taiwan and the USA. This market is expected to be worth at least GBP 230 million a year by 2031 to UK exporters.“The renewable energy sector has built its success on delivering innovation; floating wind is a prime example of what we can achieve. Our vision is to do much more at scale, securing further cost reduction and much-needed new capacity,” RenewableUK’s Head of Policy and Regulation, Rebecca Williams, said.“As we build even further out to sea into deeper waters, floating wind will unlock new areas for us to make use of our state of the art technology. We want to work with Government to maximise the extraordinary opportunities offered by this cutting-edge technology in which the UK leads the world.” Overall, the UK has the potential to install 75GW of offshore wind capacity, including floating wind, by 2050, up from 8.5GW now, to reach net zero by the most cost-effective pathway.“Scotland’s offshore energy experience and our deep water wind resource means we’re already a world leader in floating wind – technology which will be necessary to meet our net-zero emissions target and offers the most cost-effective pathway to delivering more than 50GW of offshore wind in UK waters,” Morag Watson, Director of Policy of Scottish Renewables, said.“This publication sets out how government, working with industry, as agreed in the Offshore Wind Sector Deal, can identify and deliver joint investments in the infrastructure which will underpin the development of floating wind and its supply chain, supporting the development of the UK Industrial Strategy.”last_img read more

Read More →

Shoah adds testimonies from Rwanda

first_imgThe USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education has begun expanding its collection of testimonials by preserving and sharing video testimony from survivors of the 1994 Rwandan genocide.The institute plans to expand its Visual History Archive by 2012 to include 50 testimonies from Rwandan survivors and witnesses, the Shoah Foundation announced Friday.Donald Miller, executive director of the USC Center for Religion and Civic Culture and professor of religion and sociology, said USC can play an integral role in the preservation of history from the Rwanda genocide.“I am very pleased that the Shoah Foundation is sharing its expertise with survivors of the genocide in Rwanda,” he said. “Western nations ignored this atrocity in 1994, refusing to see it as a genocide, even though more than 800,000 Tutsis were killed in 100 days. It is important to document this genocide because history tends to repeat itself.”Testimonies from the genocide have been collected in Rwanda by the Kigali Genocide Memorial Center. Through this partnership, the Kigali Genocide Memorial Center will maintain ownership of the files, while the Shoah Foundation Institute helps to build expertise in visual cataloging and dissemination of the testimonies.The expansion of the Visual History Archive was made possible by collaborations with IBUKA, a non-profit organization that represents survivors of the 1994 Rwandan genocide.The Shoah Foundation Institute has conducted 10 pilot interviews with Rwandan survivors living in the United States and has indexed them according to the institute’s methodology.Current visiting fellows at the Shoah Foundation Institute, who are Rwandan genocide survivors themselves, are working with the staff to develop an indexing terminology for the new testimonies that will be added to the Visual History Archive.“The lesson we’ve gotten from the pilot program is that survivors want to come forward, and they come with the mindfulness that they are speaking on behalf of those who did not survive. They are leaving a legacy so people know what happened,” Karen Jungblut, director of research and documentation at the Shoah Foundation Institute, said in a press release. “For people who were meant to be eradicated, these testimonies are an important reassurance that their lives and their stories are important to the world.”Steven Spielberg established the Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation, which was the precursor to the institute, in 1994 after producing Schindler’s List. The Foundation was created to gather video testimonies from survivors and witnesses of the Holocaust.The Visual History Archive has grown to hold 52,000 video testimonies in 32 languages, representing 56 countries since the institution’s founding.The Shoah Foundation is helping give genocide victims a voice, Stephen Smith, executive director of the Shoah Foundation, said in a press release.“We cannot compare human suffering, but its causes and consequences must be compared, with the historical integrity of each experience clearly delineated in a manner that is deep and respectful,” Smith said.Richard Dekmejian, a professor of political science who is involved in researching with the Shoah Foundation Institute, said the current archive is one-of-a-kind.“The work of the Shoah Foundation Institute is unique and unprecedented as a world center of genocide documentation for survivor testimonies,” he said. “This massive effort [began] with Holocaust testimonies, and now [will] include the Rwandan Genocide, the Armenian Genocide, as well as other genocides to be covered in the future.”Dekmejian said students can directly benefit from the Shoah Foundation’s collection of testimonies.“Dozens of my students have used Holocaust testimonies with great success and I am delighted to be associated with the Shoah leadership and faculty to further my own research on comparative genocides,” Dekmejian said.last_img read more

Read More →