26yearold man shot to death in Chollas Creek

first_img Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom 26-year-old man shot to death in Chollas Creek August 3, 2019 KUSI Newsroom, SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – A 26-year-old man was fatally wounded in the Chollas Creek neighborhood of San Diego, a police lieutenant said today.The victim and the suspect were involved in a fight near the intersection of University Avenue and 52nd Street that continued toward the 4000 block of 52nd Street, where the suspect pulled out a gun and shot the 26-year-old man, San Diego Police Lt. Matthew Dobbs said.The suspect was last seen running west on University Avenue, Dobbs said.Police were dispatched to the scene about 2:30 p.m. Friday and paramedics rushed the shooting victim to an area hospital where he died from his injuries, Dobbs said.The department’s homicide unit asked anyone with information regarding the shooting death to call them at 619-531-2293. Posted: August 3, 2019last_img read more

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Increased deaths from lung disease tied to more fires in Southeast Asia

center_img More information: El Niño and health risks from landscape fire emissions in southeast Asia, Nature Climate Change (2012) doi:10.1038/nclimate1658AbstractEmissions from landscape fires affect both climate and air quality. Here, we combine satellite-derived fire estimates and atmospheric modelling to quantify health effects from fire emissions in southeast Asia from 1997 to 2006. This region has large interannual variability in fire activity owing to coupling between El Niño-induced droughts and anthropogenic land-use change. We show that during strong El Niño years, fires contribute up to 200 μg m−3 and 50 ppb in annual average fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone surface concentrations near fire sources, respectively. This corresponds to a fire contribution of 200 additional days per year that exceed the World Health Organization 50 μg m−3 24-hr PM2.5 interim target4 and an estimated 10,800 (6,800–14,300)-person (~ 2%) annual increase in regional adult cardiovascular mortality. Our results indicate that reducing regional deforestation and degradation fires would improve public health along with widely established benefits from reducing carbon emissions, preserving biodiversity and maintaining ecosystem services. Study area population and locations of fire activity. Image (c) Nature, doi:10.1038/nclimate1658 Ancient El Nino clue to future floods Citation: Increased deaths from lung disease tied to more fires in Southeast Asia during El Nino (2012, August 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-08-deaths-lung-disease-tied-southeast.htmllast_img read more

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All of eight this Khan rocks

The capital was witness to the parampara tradition when sitar maestro Imrat Khan, introduced his youngest son, Azmat Ali Khan, as the next prodigy of the Khan brood at the ongoing five-day Delhi Classical Music Festival.Eight-year-old Azmat is the son of the Imrat Khan’s American wife Melinda and the youngest of his five sons – the others being Nishat, Irshad, Wajahat and Shafaatullah – all of whom are accomplished international musicians in the family Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’gharana.‘It is my duty to teach my sons the music we have played for generations and have given to the world. I devote all my time to teach them despite my failing health. Like all his brothers, Azmat shows promise. I cannot abandon my responsibility as a father,’ Imrat Khan said.Azmat played raga Jhinjhoti, a deviation of the Khamaja family of ragas, to a packed hall at the Kamani theatre in the capital. The playful child who drawls on his ‘r’ and ‘s’, tackled a sitar that towered way above his two-foot frame with ease, plucking the same melliflous notes as his father’s despite a few nervous misses. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixAfter the recital, Azmat spoke to the media. He said he had been learning the sitar and surbahar – two instruments that his father commands at will – since the age of three.‘I practise for a couple of hours everyday under my father’s tutelage. I just love doing it. I don’t have fixed hours for taalim,’ the third-grader said.The little ‘ustaad, however, prefers the complicated surbahar and its basic sound to that of the sitar. He plays both the instruments. ‘But it is a hard choice to say which one I like better…Preferably the surbahar,’ he drawled.His fingers hurt after long hours of strumming the strings. ‘But I have to do it,’ Azmat said.‘Most of my friends in school are musicians. My best friend is a pianist,’ Azmat told. read more

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