Ricky Hatton Calls It Quits After Vyacheslav Senchenko Loss

Ricky Hatton, a former two-weight world champion, has announced his retirement for a second time after his comeback defeat to 35-year-old Vyacheslav Senchenko Saturday night.The 34-year-old Hatton previously announced his retirement in July of 2011, but had not fought since 2009. Hatton wanted to see if he could still compete in the sport that he loved.“I needed one more fight to see if I had still got it – and I haven’t” he said. “I couldn’t have done any better.”Hatton started the fight aggressively, but as the match progressed fatigue began to set in and he began to let his guard down. A body shot delivered by Senchenko to Hatton’s ribs in the ninth-round ended the fight and he knew his career was done.“A fighter knows and I know it isn’t there anymore,” Hatton said. “I have got to be a man and say it is the end of Ricky Hatton.”Hatton admitted after the fight that he was in the best shape he could be in, but even if the hit to body would not have occurred, he would have barely been able to finish the fight.“It’s too many hard fights, I’ve burned the candle at both ends, I’ve put my body through the mire in and out of the ring,” he said.This is Hatton’s second disappointing defeat. He was knocked out in his previous fight by Manny Pacquiao in Las Vegas in 2009 and retired following the loss.After the Saturday night defeat, Hatton said he accomplished his goal by seeing if he could mount a comeback without being eliminated in the early rounds.“I have got the answers I needed,” Hatton said. “I can look at myself in the mirror and tell myself I did my best.”Matthew Macklin, the former European middleweight champion, feels Hatton made the right decision.“It is the right thing to do,” Macklin told BBC Sport. “He was a shadow of his former self on Saturday night.”Hatton’s career has had a lasting impression on Macklin and boxing community. Macklin said that instead of mourning his loss, that his career should be celebrated.“We should talk about how good he was,” Macklin said. “He is one of the greatest British fighters, certainly one of the most exciting, and he is a former two-time world champion.”Hatton ends his career with a lifetime of record of 45-3. read more

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5 LittleKnown iPhone and iPad Apps for Startups

first_img min read Being a small business owner can be like playing in a one-man band. Accounting, shipping, sales and administrative tasks all fall on you. With this in mind, Apple has put together a collection of apps designed to help any new business owner work faster and more efficiently.Here’s a look at five new or recently updated iOS apps that you might have missed:1. Invoice2Go: This app helps you create invoices and estimates on your iPhone or iPad. You can create a master list of regular billable items, or use the Receipts2go plugin to bill for client-specific supplies. Completed invoices can be emailed or printed right from the app. Invoice2Go also has a reporting tool that lays out your financial situation at a glance. You can create three invoices for free. Paid plans start at $24.99 a year for up to 100 invoices.Related: 4 Simple iPhone Apps for Creating and Editing Documents2. Docusign Ink: Eliminate printing and scanning with this app, which lets you sign all kinds of documents electronically. Import documents from a cloud drive or take a picture with your device’s camera. Docusign Ink converts the document so you can drag your pre-set signature into place. Then save and send.Need a client to sign off on a work order, sale or contract? You can use Docusign Ink to request a signature by email or have clients sign off digitally in person. You can sign unlimited documents for free, but there is a limit of five additional signatories before you’ll be asked to purchase a yearly plan starting at $15 a month.Doucsign Ink is also available on Android.3. Bento 4 for iPad: This personal database app was recently redesigned for the iPad making it even easier to organize and present data. What makes Bento 4 different from the average spreadsheet tool is that it allows you to combine your tables with text fields and images by simply dragging and dropping boxes on to one of 40 free templates.Use Bento 4 to create a product catalog for sales meetings, to manage multi-step projects or build a detailed contact list. The iPad app costs $9.99 and syncs with Bento’s desktop software for the Mac.4. Concur: This app is an organizational tool for frequent travelers. Use it to book hotel rooms, check airline reservations and manage your itinerary. Once you’re on the move, use Concur to track your expenses as they occur. You can type information by hand, scan receipts or use e-receipts to add data. At the end of your trip, Concur combines all of the information into a finished expense report. Also available on Android, the app is free for iPhone and iPad but you’ll need to link it to a desktop Concur account. Subscriptions start at $8 per person, per month.5. Delivery Status Touch: If you send or receive a lot of packages each month, Delivery Status Touch can help keep track of them. For $4.99, the app works with the major delivery services and pulls information automatically from Amazon, Apple and Google Checkout. Once you input a package, it gets added to the home screen. From there, you can see the progress of every item — coming or going.Related: 3 Low-Cost Sales Lead Tools for Startups Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. November 2, 2012 Register Now » Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Globallast_img read more

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Cracking the Code on Diversity in Tech

first_img Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Register Now » March 16, 2017 Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. It seems the tech industry’s ability to disrupt and innovate has found its limit. Tech companies have acknowledged the need to diversify their workforce, but haven’t quite been able to crack the code on how to do so. And in a post-Trump world, candidates’ anxieties around the issue are showing no signs of slowing. How can an industry with innovation in its DNA, and virtually unlimited resources, effectively address this issue? The answer is a two-pronged approach that addresses both the next generation of diverse workers and the qualified and underrepresented candidates who are knocking on Silicon Valley’s door today.Related: Why Gender Diversity In Tech MattersFor an industry that is obsessed with data, it may not be surprising that a common pitfall is an over-emphasis on numbers. This obsession with metrics has led to initiatives like affirmative action hiring programs set up by some of the biggest names in tech, which, unfortunately, have failed to perform as hoped. While hiring initiatives and public revealing of diversity numbers are steps in the right direction, they are just that — a step, not a cure.The bottom line is that both short and long-term solutions are needed to really solve this problem. Qualitative measurement of this type of progress is difficult, but the goal should be a lasting cultural shift, not a data point to share with the world. Thinking long-term: Expanding talent pools.While some have written off the leaky STEM pipeline as a “cop out” for companies, addressing systematic exclusion and low retention is essential to long-term progress. According to the National Science Foundation, women with bachelor’s degrees in math and computer sciences has declined by about 25 percent since the mid-80s, when computer games were aggressively marketed as a boy’s hobby. Instead of competing over the same limited pool of diverse talent, the tech industry should come together to create new, larger pools. Building programs that support STEM education, vocational schools and skills training for underrepresented groups will grow the pipeline of more diverse potential candidates for everyone down the line.Google, despite its less than stellar diversity numbers, should be applauded for their long-term thinking in this regard. The company has created industry-wide initiatives aimed at growing the overall pool of underrepresented talent. Last June, the internet giant debuted its Made with Code campaign in an effort to get young women excited about computer science — a field that less than one percent of high school girls think of as part of their future. Another Google-led program, CS First, makes it possible for teachers and community volunteers to form computer science clubs for young kids.Related: 21 Silicon Valley Women Who Are More Qualified to Be on Your Board Than Mark CubanWhat we can do now: Eliminate biases.While it’s essential to grow highly skilled and diverse labor pools, an ocean of qualified, underrepresented candidates isn’t enough if unconscious biases continue to derail hiring processes. Removing gatekeepers’ subjectivity and prejudices from the process will not only help level the playing field for candidates today, but also ensure a lower barrier for entry for underrepresented talent pools in the future.Researchers found that companies using GitHub approved code written by women at a higher rate than code written by men, but only if the gender was not disclosed. As soon as gender was revealed, the situation reversed and the acceptance rate for code written by women declined. This extends to race as well; a study by the National Bureau of Economic Research revealed that candidates with African American names have a tougher time finding a job.The issue is difficult to regulate, but companies can prevent unconscious biases from impacting their hiring decisions in a few ways. An easy first step is to use gender-neutral language in job descriptions that will attract a diverse pool of applicants. Using a tool like Textio can help with this. Once the evaluation process begins, “blind” hiring tactics can eliminate potential biases. For example, hiring tools can hide the name, photo and university from candidates’ resumes. Some have even suggested that virtual reality may be the answer to masking appearances during interviews. While VR headsets may not be realistic for everyone, creating consistent scorecards to judge candidates can also prevent interviewers from putting too much weight on things like physical appearance or shared interests.Related: 3 Ways to Attract and Hire Diverse, Hardworking MillennialsThe issue of bias is evident not only when it comes to hiring, but also retention. Unconscious biases can create a less inclusive company culture that perpetuates traditional white patriarchal power dynamics. People of color who enter the tech industry leave the field at more than 3.5 times the rate of white men, and research from the Center for Talent Innovation shows that U.S. women working in SET fields are 45 percent more likely than their male peers to leave the industry within their first year.The industry needs more than superficial band-aids if it wants to create a genuine and sustainable culture of inclusion. Real progress might mean not having much to show the world for 18-24 months, or even 18 years in the case of initiatives to patch the leaky STEM pipeline. The benefits of a diverse workforce are more than just impressive figures in an annual report. Diversity brings with it unique perspectives, experiences and solutions to the everyday challenges businesses face. We cannot effectively create the tools and technology of the future if we surround ourselves with homogeneity of thought and experience today. 5 min readlast_img read more

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