Japanese prosecutor suspends contempt proceedings against journalist

first_img November 19, 2020 Find out more May 5, 2021 Find out more Japanese reporter held in Myanmar is charged with “false information” September 16, 2020 Find out more RSF_en May 30, 2014 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Japanese prosecutor suspends contempt proceedings against journalist JapanAsia – Pacific RSF urges recently appointed Japan Prime Minister to take a new turn towards press freedom News Help by sharing this information News Newscenter_img to go further JapanAsia – Pacific On eve of the G20 Riyadh summit, RSF calls for public support to secure the release of jailed journalists in Saudi Arabia Organisation Reporters Without Borders takes note of prosecutor Eiji Masuhara’s decision to suspend “criminal contempt” proceedings against freelance journalist Mari Takenouchi in connection with her coverage of the aftermath of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster.The proceedings were initiated as a result of a complaint by Ryoko Ando, the head of an organization called Ethos, after Takenouchi tweeted that its efforts to get people to return to live in contaminated areas were an “experiment on human beings.”“The decision to suspend the proceedings against the journalist Mari Takenouchi is obviously encouraging, but we persist in calling on the authorities to abandon them altogether and not just suspend them,” Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Christophe Deloire said.The prosecutor urged Takenouchi to continue her work and even wished her “good luck” with it. Takenouchi told Reporters Without Borders that her goal now was to “save the children living in contaminated areas and suffering from thyroid cancer.”Japan is ranked 59th out of 180 countries in the 2014 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index.——————————————————————————————–11.03.14 Nuclear lobby still gagging independent coverage three years after disasterReporters Without Borders deplores the climate of censorship and self-censorship that continues to prevail in discussion of nuclear energy in Japan three years after the disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, 250 km north of Tokyo.In particular, Reporters Without Borders condemns the treatment of independent journalists and bloggers who are critical of the government and the nuclear energy lobby, dubbed the “nuclear village” by its detractors. The latest example is a “criminal contempt” complaint against freelance journalist and blogger Mari Takenouchi for a tweet about a project by an NGO called Ethos for encouraging the population to keep living in areas contaminated with radioactivity, which she described as “human experiments.”“The complaint brought against Mari Takenouchi is yet another example of the way groups linked to the nuclear energy lobby are trying to gag opposing views,” said Benjamin Ismaïl, the head of the Reporters Without Borders Asia-Pacific desk.“By criticizing the programme to encourage inhabitants to keep living in still radioactive areas, this journalist is just documenting a legitimate and well-substantiated concern about the health risks linked to radiation. We urge the head of Ethos, Ryoko Ando, to withdraw her complaint against Takenouchi, which acts as a deterrent to all independent news providers.“As we feared in 2012, the freedom to inform and be informed continues to be restricted by the ‘nuclear village’ and government, which are trying to control coverage of their handling of the aftermath of this disaster. Its long-term consequences are only now beginning to emerge and coverage of the health risks and public health issues is more important than ever.”Ismaïl added: “However, those who try to draw attention to the continuing risks linked to radiation or who accuse of the government of being unprepared or even deliberately minimizing the risks are censored and harassed by the authorities and the nuclear power industry, which increasingly resembles a dark and untouchable mafia.”Takenouchi, a freelance journalist who has a blog and has translated three books on nuclear radiation, was notified on 29 January by the police of Iwaki Minami, in Fukushima prefecture, that Ethos director Ryoko Ando (also known as Yoko Kamata) had brought a criminal contempt complaint against her in connection with the tweet.After interrogating Takenouchi at her home for three hours on 13 February, the Fukushima police asked her to go to police headquarters the next day, when she was interrogated for another four hours. The findings of their investigation were sent on at the beginning of March to Fukushima’s chief prosecutor, who will then decide whether to prosecute her.In her articles and in interviews for independent media, Takenouchi has accused the government of pursing a public relations policy that plays down the radiation health risk for people in contaminated areas.She has written: “Ethos is a programme where residents including pregnant women and children are encouraged to keep living in contaminated areas through carrying out decontamination and radiation measurement, which most importantly resulted in sickness among the majority of children. This was conducted in Belarus and now is in Fukushima funded by pro-nuclear lobbies.”She pointed out on 3 February that the Ethos programme’s launch had only been reported at the local level by national public TV broadcaster NHK and some local TV stations. To alert public opinion, she recently posted a video in which she describes the findings of her research, based mainly on material in the public domain, about radiation risks and the dangers that the Ethos programme poses for the youngest sector of the population. Japan has fallen 22 places in the Reporters Without Borders press freedom index in the past two years, and is now ranked 59th out of 180 countries.The six-place fall of the past year is partly attributable to the Japanese Diet’s adoption of a special intelligence protection bill on 26 November that will allow the government to classify any sensitive information as a “state secret.”Support Mari Takenouchi, sign the petition here. News Follow the news on Japan Receive email alerts This case recalls the libel suit that the head of a nuclear security systems company brought against freelance journalist Minoru Tanaka in 2012 in connection with his coverage of developments in the nuclear energy industry after the disaster. The suit was abandoned in August 2013.Ever since the Fukushima-Daiichi disaster in 2011, freelance journalists and foreign news media trying to cover Japan’s nuclear energy industry have found their access to information being restricted.Both Japanese and foreign reporters have described to Reporters Without Borders the various methods used by the authorities to prevent independent coverage of the disaster and its consequences.They have been prevented from covering anti-nuclear demonstrations and have been threatened with criminal proceedings for entering the “red zone” declared around the plant. And they have even been interrogated and subjected to intimidation by the intelligence services.Reporters Without Borders is previewing here a passage from the “Fukushima censored” video that will be posted on our website (www.rsf.org) soon.last_img read more

Read More →

PPP condemns hike in rental, drainage fees for Region 5 farmers

first_img….calls on Govt to withdraw increasesThe Opposition People’s Progressive Party (PPP) has strongly condemned what it describes as an “ongoing assault” against rice farmers, particularly those in Region Five (Mahaica-Berbice), and calls on the coalition Administration to immediately scrap the increase in land rents and drainage charges.The Party said Government should also withdraw the notices sent forthwith, especially since it “destroyed” the lucrative Venezuelan market for rice in just a few months after assuming office and has since been unable to find a suitable substitute.According to the Opposition, the coalition then imposed Value Added Tax (VAT) on agricultural equipment, accessories and various items needed for the rice industry that were all VAT free under the PPP/Civic Administration.The Party went on to point out that President David Granger has revoked over 50 agricultural leases issued by the PPP/C Government to rice farmers in the Mahaica Mahaicony Abary/Agriculture Developmental Authority Scheme (MMA/ADA), without affording these farmers a hearing and for no apparent reason, other than that these leases were granted by the PPP/C Government.“We represented these farmers in the High Court, which ruled that the President revocation of these leases was unlawful and unconstitutional. Not content with the destruction that they have done so far, the MMA/ADA, upon instructions of this Government, increased land rents from $1000 per acre to $7000 per acre and drainage and irrigation charges from $2500 to $8000,” the Party said in a statement on Wednesday.The missive further stated that a few days ago, the MMA/ADA issued hundreds of notices to rice farmers informing them that unless they pay these exorbitant increases in land rents and drainage charges, legal proceedings would be instituted against them.Many rice farmers say that were they to pay these new charges, they would have to stop cultivating because they simply cannot afford to sustain such high increase in expenditure at this point in time, the Party said.“Rather than assist the rice industry, as we have demanded the Government to do, they are driving more nails into the coffin of the industry. To now threaten the rice farmers with litigation is simply callous and unconscionable,” the Opposition said.The PPP declared that it resolutely stands by rice farmers on this issue and would even defend them in the courts, if necessary.last_img read more

Read More →

Pandor gets SA’s first smart ID card

first_img4 June 2013 Home Affairs Minister Naledi Pandor has become the first person to receive one of South Africa’s new smart ID cards, containing biometric data embedded in a microchip and designed to cut down on fraud while enabling faster delivery of government services. The minister’s state-of-the-art new ID was delivered to her office in Pretoria on Tuesday. South Africa will begin rolling out the new smart card IDs from next month, issuing them to to all first-time and re-issue applicants. The Department of Home Affairs plans to issue the smart card ID to all South Africans over the next eight years as it phases out the current green bar-coded ID book. To begin with, 27 Home Affairs regional offices, three in each province, will process smart card IDs, with more offices to follow suit over the next three years. Containing microchips embedded with biometric data unique to each individual, and with the information laser-engraved on the chip to prevent tampering, the new IDs will be near impossible to forge, according to the department. Besides cutting down on identity theft and fraud, the smart IDs will speed up the process of establishing a modern, reliable population register. The cost of the new IDs will be the same as the amount paid for the green bar-coded IDs, which currently cost R140. IDs are free for first-time applicants. According to Pandor, the new ID will take about three days for applicants to receive – compared to a 54-day turnaround time for the green bar-coded ID. Altech Card Solutions and Gemalto Southern Africa, the successful bidders for the production of the smart ID cards, were announced last month. SAnews.gov.za and SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Read More →

Microsoft’s Board Of Directors: Time For A Change

first_imgIt should surprise nobody that neither Steve Ballmer nor Bill Gates has a degree in computer science (Gates at least wrote software in the early days of the company, Ballmer has only managed developers). Neither has ever worked for an IT company outside Microsoft. Both have been Microsoft’s decisionmakers for more than 30 years.Given that, you might expect Microsoft’s board to include many directors knowledgeable about what goes on outside the company’s own technology realm! Yet I found only a meager three out of nine directors with such experience. And I graded on a curve, counting academic experience as real work experience.(In comparison, Facebook looks like the weakest company in regard to directors’ tech experience, while Google’s strength is obvious. Its board wins in every category, and that may be a key reason why it constantly beats Microsoft.)The Gates Era – And AfterwardI worked for 20 years at Microsoft – when Bill Gates was not only chairman and CEO but by far the company’s largest shareholder. During that time, the Board was never as strong as I would have liked. Yet until Microsoft lost its landmark antitrust trial in 2000, Gates did a good job guiding the company through the turbulent PC revolution, with the help of Jon Shirley, Microsoft’s former president and long-term board member, former COO Bob Herbold, and others.After Gates handed the CEO reins to Ballmer, things changed profoundly. Gates kept his chairman title even after he left the company in 2008, but the board did not get strengthened. I have served on several boards, and know how easy it is for a board to be reduced to a mere formality – especially when it’s dominated by founders or longtime company executives.Microsoft’s Board Today – And TomorrowMicrosoft’s tech leadership is being severely challenged. The chairman is no longer the respected tech guru he once seemed to be. Microsoft’s CEO has never been mentioned as a technology leader. So who on the Board provides the required oversight of company’s tech strategy? Who “works with management to determine the company’s mission and long-term strategy” instead of just dealing with financial and procedural issues?I can’t spot enough people with sufficient intellectual firepower or market insight to properly evaluate the company’s strategic objectives. Electing decent and well-meaning people to the Board is not enough to propel a company into the stratosphere of the highly competitive IT universe.For the last decade, Microsoft has managed to produce respectable revenues and profits by incrementally improving already well-established products. To win over the long haul in a fast-changing market, though, a leader must relentlessly out-innovate competitors.This was never Steve Ballmer’s personal strength. He needed help and I believe the board let him down, or maybe he didn’t listen carefully enough. I believe Microsoft’s shareholders need to overhaul their board and elect directors with tech foresight who will force the changes needed in the company’s senior leadership team.Experienced women and men should be on every board of directors to help guide the often younger executive teams. But sometimes this can be a severe handicap. Both Google’s and Facebook’s directors represent a younger generation than Microsoft’s. They seem to have a better handle on the pulse and the trends of the IT market.Why can’t Microsoft attract that type of talent? Two thoughts cross my mind. First, Microsoft might no longer be exciting and reputable enough to attract top talent. Second, and worse, Gates and Ballmer seem to be controlling Microsoft as their personal playground – avoiding bringing in most capable directors who might eventually threaten their positions.That’s the final straw for why I believe Microsoft’s board has served its time and should be replaced. Of course, if you really did chop up the Borg, as I recommended, this whole issue would naturally resolve itself.Bill Gates image courtesy of 3777190317 / Shutterstock. Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… Tags:#Fixing Microsoft#Microsoft 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… joachim kempin Related Posts IT + Project Management: A Love Affair One cure I recently recommended for Microsoft was to split up the company. I challenged its board of directors to do so before shareholders stage a revolution.(See What To Do With Microsoft? Chop Up The Borg – Now.)The shareholders could do just that, and did so last week with HP’s board, because “shareholders elect the board to oversee management and to assure that shareholder long-term interests are served.” On its website, Microsoft further mentions that its board “oversees the company’s business affairs and integrity, works with management to determine the company’s mission and long-term strategy” etc., etc., etc.Is Microsoft’s current board really doing a good job?Microsoft’s Board vs. Its CompetitorsMicrosoft’s competitors have similar charters. The duty of Google’s directors is “to oversee management and evaluate strategy,” and they are bound to assess “Google’s overall strategy and monitor Google’s performance against its operating plan and against the performance of its peers.”I like how Google emphasizes oversight of management and evaluation of all the company’s strategies. Microsoft’s directors, on the other hand, are being directed to look after long-term shareholder interests and evaluate long-term company strategies. Could this be the reason – or an excuse – for missing so many short-term opportunities in the last decade?The requirement for Google’s board to judge management’s performance against its competitors highlights the company’s competitive spirit. How well did Microsoft’s board do this over the last decade?In a recent NBC interview, Microsoft’s chairman – Bill Gates – said “amazing things” have happened under the tutelage of CEO Steve Ballmer. Most pundits would disagree. And so do I, knowing that in that same interview Gates contradicted himself by noting his unhappiness with Microsoft’s rate of innovation. Where does the buck stop in this regard: with Gates, with Ballmer or with the board?What Makes A Good Board Of Directors?Most tech companies’ shareholders have elected a mix of academics, venture capitalists and financiers to their boards. What interests me most is how well its members are actually educated and how much experience they bring to the table in regard to technology. Fortunately, their professional backgrounds are available on their companies’ websites.last_img read more

Read More →

India signs civil nuclear deal with South Korea

first_imgIndia on Monday signed a civil nuclear cooperation deal with South Korea, allowing a framework for Korean companies to participate in atomic power plant projects in the country.The agreement was signed after a meeting between President Pratibha Patil with her South Korean counterpart Lee Myung-Bak.South Korea has become the ninth country which had signed nuclear agreement with India after it got the waiver from the Nuclear Suppliers’ Group (NSG) in 2008.The others are the US, France, Russia, Canada, Mongolia, Kazakhstan, Argentina and Namibia, an official said.South Korea operates 20 nuclear plants that generate some 35 per cent of its electricity needs, and is keen to export its technology to fast developing countries like India.”The two countries have just concluded and signed a bilateral agreement on cooperation in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy,” said Sanjay Singh, Secretary (East), Ministry of External Affairs.”It is like other civil nuclear agreements signed between India and other countries. We look forward to Republic of Korea for becoming one more partner in the development of civil nuclear energy in India,” the official said without divulging further details on the agreement and its mandate but termed the deal as a “win-win” for both the nations.Both India and South Korea decided to start talks on civil nuclear cooperation during a meeting between Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and South Korean President Lee on the sidelines of the ASEAN Summit in Hanoi in October last year.The nuclear agreement was signed by Dr Srikumar Banerjee, Secretary Department of Atomic Energy and Kim Sung Hwan, Foreign Minister of the Republic of Korea.advertisementEarlier, Patil and her South Korean counterpart Lee held a 20-minute restrictive meeting followed by a delegation level talks for over an hour at ‘Blue House’, official residence of Korean President.Patil is on a week-long tour of Korea and Mongolia.Besides the agreement on nuclear cooperation, the two sides also signed a Memorandum of Understanding on media exchanges and another agreement on administrative arrangements to provide social security to people working in India and Korea.The MoU on media was signed by Singh and Choung Byoung-gug, Minister for Culture, Sports and Tourism.The third agreement for administrative arrangements for social security was signed by Skand Ranjan Tayal, Ambassador of India to South Korea and Chin Soo Hea, Minister of Health and Welfare.Briefing the media on the deliberations between the two Presidents, Singh said both the countries also discussed the expansion of defence cooperation.”Increased naval and coast guard cooperation was a possibility that was touched upon in the discussions. They deliberated on issues pertaining to co-production of defence equipment, transfer of technology and joint Research and Development,” the Secretary said.”They also discussed the possibilities of cooperation in the peaceful uses of outer space. India looks forward to once again launching Korean satellites on Indian rockets,” Singh quoting Patil as saying to the President Lee adding that “our facilities are of high quality and are available at competitive price.”Patil also invited Korean companies to invest in India and explore business opportunities.”Rashtrapatiji conveyed to President Lee that the investment environment in India is improving rapidly and invited more Korean companies to invest in India and make it their base for manufacturing operations including for export to third countries,” Singh said.She pointed out that Indian pharmaceuticals and IT services are of high quality and requested the government of Republic of Korea (ROK) to enhance market access for these Indian products in the Korean market.Both the Presidents agreed to encourage greater people-to-people exchanges and stressed to start more direct flights between India and South Korea.”For this purpose, we have to amend our Civil Aviation Agreement so as to grant each other’s carriers fifth freedom rights. They agreed to do this soon,” the official said.They also talked about India’s proposal of revival of Nalanda University besides discussing regional and national issues.”They decided to increase cooperation and coordination in the East Asia summit process and also the issues pertaining to Asia pacific,” he said.Patil will leave for Mongolia on July 27.The visit to both the east Asian nations is part of the country’s ‘Look East Policy’ to further mutual cooperation.Patil also offered floral tributes to a bust of Nobel laureate Rabindranath Tagore near here on the occasion of his 150th birth anniversary.- With PTI inputslast_img read more

Read More →

Rajyavardhan Rathore urges corporates to invest in development of sports

first_imgNew Delhi, Jul 26 (PTI) Union Minister Rajyavardhan Singh Rathore today urged investors to pump in money for the development of sports in the country. The sports minister announced that the government is looking to launch a project that will identify the potential and hone the skills of 8-10 years of age in the country and provide them scholarships.”At any given time there are 10 crore students in schools. We will partner with school boards, state governments and even the armed forces. They will identify and map the physical fitness of 8-10-year-olds based on a simple test,” Rathore said at the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) Global Sports Summit Scorecard.After the first test has been carried out the number of student will be narrowed to 5000 children followed by 1000 students on which super advance tests will be conducted.”The right physical talent for the right sport will be identified and Rs 5 lakh scholarship will be given to them for eight years so that by the time the child is 16 years he is ready to be a champion. This is the time to invest in sports,” he said. The minister also emphasised that no athlete will have to hesitate before asking for funds as “there is no dearth of money”. “From 1990 till date, all Olympic medallist and potential medallist have been funded by the National Sports Development Fund (NSDF). Its a fund that was largely supported by the PSUs, now we are opening it to the entire country,” Rathore said.The minister said that government is also planning a manufacturers’ summit this year, where international companies along with their Indian counterparts will come together and tell the government what policy modifications are required to start manufacturing sport equipment in India.advertisement “By 2019, the sports industry will reach USD 75 billion, it is not only good for individuals but also for the corporates. This is the time to be a part of the Indian sports story,” he concluded. PTI APA KHSKHSlast_img read more

Read More →

10 months agoLiverpool defender Van Dijk: My Alisson wind-up after Man Utd win

first_imgLiverpool defender Van Dijk: My Alisson wind-up after Man Utd winby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool defender Virgil van Dijk admits he enjoyed a dig at Alisson after victory over Manchester United.Such is the strength of spirit in the dressing room, Van Dijk felt comfortable jokingly admonishing the Brazil international afterwards.”I said to him “We have no clean sheet because of you!” No, I made a joke out of it. He’s been fantastic for us,” he said.”It happens, everyone makes mistakes. Maybe I didn’t react as well as maybe I could have. It happens sometimes.”It’s how we react and he did brilliantly in the second half. He didn’t get nervous. We had to all bounce back and we did. I said to him, ‘Just keep going, keep your head up and we’ll be fine.'” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Read More →

11 days agoReal Madrid veteran Luka Modric eases injury fears

first_imgAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Real Madrid veteran Luka Modric eases injury fearsby Carlos Volcano11 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveReal Madrid veteran Luka Modric has played down an injury suffered in action for Croatia last night.He left the Wales clash injured with two minutes remaining. Modric collided with Harry Wilson while attempting to halt a counter-attack by the hosts.The Madrid midfielder was able to get back onto his feet and after receiving treatment from Croatia’s medical team, asked to be taken off. He limped off the field without hardly being able to walk on his right leg.But he has since stated this morning: “I have a bruise, which hurts a little and is swelling. It’s big, but I think it’s not serious and I’ll be fine in a few days.”It is an injury that Dr. Jankovic (the Croatian national doctor) said was unpleasant, but should not be long. He immediately communicated it to the doctors of Real Madrid.” last_img read more

Read More →

Extra folic acid taken during pregnancy doesnt prevent preeclampsia study

first_imgTORONTO – Taking high-dose folic acid during pregnancy does not prevent pre-eclampsia in women at elevated risk for the potentially deadly condition, a Canadian-led international study has found.The finding, which refutes a long-held belief about folic acid’s preventive role in pre-eclampsia, is expected to alter the practice of prescribing extra doses of the B vitamin to high-risk pregnant women worldwide.Principal investigator Dr. Mark Walker of the University of Ottawa said the study’s finding doesn’t mean foregoing low-dose folic acid, which is taken to prevent fetal neural-tube defects, which can cause such conditions as spina bifida.“All women should take folic acid for at least three months prior to conception,” said Walker, chief of obstetrics and gynecology at the Ottawa Hospital. “I think it’s safe and efficacious to take .4 to 1 milligram of folic acid in a multivitamin throughout the pregnancy.“However, those women who are at risk for pre-eclampsia, there is no benefit to being on a high dose of folic acid.”Pre-eclampsia is a condition caused by elevated blood pressure as a result of pregnancy. It is the second-leading cause of maternal death in Canada after venous blood clots that go to the lungs. Each year, about 78,000 women around the world die from the condition.After pre-term birth, pre-eclampsia is also the second-leading cause of perinatal mortality in Canada, “so it’s a big contributor to still birth as well as neonatal death,” said Walker.“In the majority of cases, we need to deliver the baby to save the mother’s life,” he said. “If that’s at 37 weeks, it’s not such a problem. But if it’s at 26 or 28 weeks, it is a huge issue.”Walker said previous observational studies, by his team and other research groups around the globe, had led to the conclusion that having high-risk women take an extra four mg of folic acid daily during pregnancy would cut the incidence of pre-eclampsia by about 30 per cent.But the Ottawa scientists wanted to put that notion to the acid test with a large randomized controlled trial, the type of study considered the gold standard of medical research.The 2011-2016 study recruited about 2,300 pregnant women at risk for pre-eclampsia, who were enrolled at 70 centres in five countries — Canada, the U.K., Australia, Jamaica and Argentina.Half the women were randomly assigned to take four extra milligrams of folic acid daily, while the other half received a placebo pill.“What we had hypothesized and anticipated was that the high-dose folic acid would reduce the incidence of pre-eclampsia by 30 per cent,” said Walker.“However, what we found was there was absolutely no difference between the group treated with high-dose folic acid and the placebo. Both groups had a pre-eclampsia rate around 14 per cent.”Walker believes findings from the study, published Wednesday in the BMJ, will “absolutely” change standard practice around the world.Dr. Linda Szymanski, a maternal-fetal medicine specialist at the Mayo Clinic, said she was not surprised by the finding and that high-dose folic acid is not something she or her colleagues would have prescribed to prevent pre-eclampsia.“I would hope if that people were prescribing it for pre-eclampsia prevention that this study would change their practice because it is a well-done randomized controlled trial, with a lot of subjects,” Szymanski, who was not involved in the research, said Wednesday from Rochester, Minn.“I think that if I were prescribing it for pre-eclampsia, this would have affected my practice.”Doctors often have pregnant women at risk of pre-eclampsia take low-dose Aspirin. But that regimen isn’t foolproof either — studies have shown the drug reduces the incidence of the condition by only about 10 to 20 per cent.In an editorial, British specialists say the Canadian-led findings “are another disappointment in the long search for a more effective measure to prevent pre-eclampsia.”“All pregnant women and their families hope for a healthy pregnancy and a happy outcome; until we find additional ways to prevent pre-eclampsia, thousands of women each year will not achieve this goal,” write Jenny Myers of the University of Manchester; Marcus Green, chief executive of the group Action on Pre-eclampsia; and obstetrics research professor Lucy Chappell of King’s College London.The next step for Walker’s team is to follow the children born to mothers in the study up to the age of six to assess their neurological and behavioural development, to see if they derived any benefit or harm from maternal exposure to extra folic acid.But longer term, the researchers hope to determine what intervention could prevent pre-eclampsia, which even without severe complications can lead to hospitalization during pregnancy and pre-term delivery through induction or caesarean section.“We plan a couple of more trials and we’re not going to rest until we’ve answered this question,” Walker said.— Follow @SherylUbelacker on Twitter.Note to readers: This is a corrected story. A previous version referenced acetaminophen instead of Aspirin, sixth last para.last_img read more

Read More →