Researchers demonstrate highly directional terahertz laser rays

first_imgA collaborative team of scientists at Harvard and the University of Leeds have demonstrated a new terahertz (THz) semiconductor laser that emits beams with a much smaller divergence than conventional THz laser sources.  The advance, published in NatureMaterials, opens the door to a wide range of applications in terahertz science and technology.  Harvard has filed a broad patent on the invention.The finding was spearheaded by postdoctoral fellow Nanfang Yu andFederico Capasso, the Robert L. Wallace Professor of Applied Physics andVinton Hayes Senior Research Fellow in Electrical Engineering, both ofHarvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), and by ateam led by Edmund Linfield at the School of Electronic and ElectricalEngineering, University of Leeds.Terahertz rays (T-rays) can penetrate efficiently through paper,clothing, plastic, and many other materials, making them ideal fordetecting concealed weapons and biological agents, imaging tumorswithout harmful side effects, and spotting defects, such as cracks,within materials.  THz radiation is also used for high-sensitivitydetection of tiny concentrations of interstellar chemicals.“Unfortunately, present THz semiconductor lasers are not suitable formany of these applications because their beam is widelydivergent—similar to how light is emitted from a lamp” says Capasso.  “Bycreating an artificial optical structure on the facet of the laser, wewere able to generate highly collimated (i.e., tightly bound) rays fromthe device.  This leads to the efficient collection and highconcentration of power without the need for conventional, expensive, andbulky lenses.”Specifically, to get around the conventional limitations, theresearchers sculpted an array of sub-wavelength-wide grooves, dubbed ametamaterial, directly on the facet of quantum cascade lasers.  Thedevices emit at a frequency of 3 THz (or a wavelength of one hundredmicrons), in the invisible part of the spectrum known as the far-infrared.“Our team was able to reduce the divergence angle of the beam emergingfrom these semiconductor lasers dramatically, whilst maintaining thehigh output optical power of identical unpatterned devices,” saysLinfield.  “This type of laser could be used by customs officials todetect illicit substances and by pharmaceutical manufacturers to checkthe quality of drugs being produced and stored.”The use of metamaterials, artificial materials engineered to provideproperties which may not be readily available in Nature, was critical tothe researchers’ successful demonstration.  While metamaterials havepotential use in novel applications such as cloaking, negativerefraction and high resolution imaging, their use in semiconductordevices has been very limited to date.“In our case, the metamaterial serves a dual function: stronglyconfining the THz light emerging from the device to the laser facet andcollimating the beam,” explains Yu.  “The ability of metamaterials toconfine strongly THz waves to surfaces makes it possible to manipulatethem efficiently for applications such as sensing and THz optical circuits.”Additional co-authors of the study included Qi Jie Wang, formerly ofHarvard University and now with the Nanyang Technological University inSingapore; graduate student Mikhail A. Kats and postdoctoral fellowJonathan A. Fan, both of Harvard University; and postdoctoral fellowsSuraj P. Khanna and Lianhe Li and faculty member A. Giles Davies, allfrom the University of Leeds.The research was partially supported by the Air Force Office ofScientific Research.  The Harvard-based authors also acknowledge thesupport of the Center for Nanoscale Systems (CNS) at Harvard University,a member of the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (NNIN).The Leeds-based authors acknowledge support from the UK’s Engineeringand Physical Sciences Research Council.last_img read more

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Wyoming Governor Says State Will ‘Double Down’ on Coal

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Christopher Coats for SNL:After two of the country’s largest coal producers announced hundreds of layoffs at Wyoming mines, the state’s political leadership responded with pledges of support and long-term services but few immediate solutions for the battered local industry.Late last week, Arch Coal Inc. and Peabody Energy Corp. announced cuts in staff at some of the country’s largest mines, citing an array of market and regulatory challenges that have weighed down the state’s struggling coal industry. A representative for the Campbell County Chamber of Commerce, near where the mines are located, told S&P Global Market Intelligence that further staff reductions had occurred in the area in recent months.Wyoming’s Republican Gov. Matt Mead responded to the layoffs and broader downturn hours after the reductions had been announced, calling a press conference to announce a “rapid response team” of state officials intended to help those communities impacted by the job losses.Mead went on to outline the host of challenges facing the state’s coal industry, noting that warmer-than-expected winter temperatures had dashed any hope of a recovery in demand this year. Further, coal export projects intended to allow Powder River Basin coal to reach the Asian market had met with further delays and resistance from coastal states.A few days after Mead’s press conference, the likelihood of new coal export projects continued to erode with news that the developers behind the Gateway Pacific project in Washington had paused its environmental review of the project.Despite those obstacles, Mead repeated plans to “double down” on his efforts to ensure that Wyoming coal has a future, including a pledge to continue his fight against Obama administration environmental regulations and support access to export markets. In 2015, Mead signed new bond legislation that would provide a billion dollars for infrastructure outside of the state. While the state law allows financial backing for any infrastructure projects outside of Wyoming, coal export terminals including the Gateway Pacific project have received the most attention since the Wyoming Infrastructure Authority received authority over such projects in 2014.Wyo. governor promises support for coal layoffs, warns of long-term challenges Wyoming Governor Says State Will ‘Double Down’ on Coallast_img read more

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Belize Defense Force Provides Crash Course In Jungle Warfare To U.S. Marines

first_imgBy Dialogo April 20, 2010 Marines and Sailors of Company F, 2nd Battalion, 23rd Marine Regiment received introductory training in jungle warfare tactics and survival from the Belize Defense Force Apr. 14 during Tradewinds 2010. Tradewinds ‘10, is Chairman of the Joint Chiefs directed, U.S. Southern Command sponsored annual exercise designed to improve cooperation with 15 Caribbean Basin partner nations in responding to regional security threats. The Marines and two Sailors who are corpsmen, had no prior training in any other type of warfare training other than desert operations and military operations on urban terrain. For the first week of the exercise the 30 student Marines and sailors of Co. F are dedicating most of their time to the classroom. But on Apr. 16 the Marines will begin a week in the jungle along the Guatemalan border to put their classroom training to the test; hacking their way with Machetes through Belizean shrub and adapting to mother nature’s pests including dangerous insects, venomous snakes, and other natural obstacles. The Marines will be in full proper protective equipment and sporting a pack weighing up to 40 lbs., full of essential supplies, food, and water. The students who are training under the close supervision of BDF Staff Sgt. Rady Puc, a jungle warfare instructor with training company, has over 15 years experience in giving students under him the necessary knowledge in jungle operations and survival. “In the Belizean Army, our initial course for jungle tactics is six weeks long,” said Puc. “[This] is a shorter version of the course, and we are covering just as much.” Outside of classroom instruction, the students observed as BDF soldiers conducted patrols and engaged mock enemy forces in nearby, thick vegetation similar to the jungle environment the Marines will face later this week. The Marines then mimicked the BDF soldiers and conducted their own mock patrols and dummy enemy contact, with adjustments from Puc and other Belizean soldiers in between. “Different countries armies do different things to prepare for the jungle,” explained Puc. The Marines I trained before adjusted very quickly once they actually got out there.” Puc, who has trained another Marine unit in the past, added it typically takes years for Belizean soldiers to master the appropriate skills needed to survive in a jungle environment all while keeping a combat mindset and maintaining vigilance of the enemy. “A week in the jungle is a piece of cake for a Belizean soldier,” said Puc. “The Marines will struggle at first, but jungle warfare isn’t easily learned by anybody.” The Marines ranging from private first class to sergeant, some who have served combat tours in Iraq and others who are just a few weeks out of the Marine school of infantry, bring different levels of experience to the training. “This jungle warfare training is good, well-rounded training,” said Lance Cpl. Robert Fishbourne, a machine gunner with Co. F, 2/23, weapons platoon, who already completed one tour in Iraq. “It’s definitely different from other training we have received, but these guys (Belizean soldiers) are really good so it’s another beneficial weapon to add to our unit’s arsenal.” The week long classroom preparation will end April 15. Some Marines are going into the jungle confident, while others are more worried about the simpler things the jungle has to offer. “I’ll do fine,” said Fishbourne. “I’m more worried about waking up next to a snake or with some kind of critter crawling on me.”last_img read more

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Catholic Charities receives grant to improve volunteer program

first_imgIf you are interested in volunteering with the program, you can reach Catholic Charities of Broome County at 607-729-9166, or you can visit their website. BINGHAMTON (WBNG) — The Catholic Charities of Broome County have been awarded more than $67,000, and it’ll all be going right back to the community. The money will go toward their retired and senior volunteer program. The program has more than 300 senior volunteers, all working to make a difference in the community. center_img “It really resounds through our whole community. There’s a lot of good that’s multiplied, it’s a domino effect. As they volunteer in all the different places in our community, food pantries and places like that, they’re actually touching many people in our community and we’re lucky to have them,” said Catholic Charities of Broome County Executive Director Lori Accardi. last_img read more

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Kirkey Racing Fabrication continues awards for IMCA national champions

first_imgST. ANDREWS WEST, Ont. – Kirkey Racing Fabrication has renewed an awards program recognizing the accomplishments of national champions in all eight IMCA divisions.The IMCA Modified national champion receives an 88 series layback containment seat while the IMCA Rac­eSaver Sprint Car national champion earns an 89 series containment seat.In its 12th season as an IMCA sponsor, the St. Andrews West, Ont., manu­facturer and accessories retailer also gives $250 product certificates to the IMCA Late Model, IMCA Sunoco Stock Car, IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stock, Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMod, Smiley’s Racing Products Southern SportMod and Mach-1 Sport Compact national champions.“Kirkey Racing is proud to continue our sponsorship of these outstanding divisions,” said Kevin Derochie. “The dedication to the sport and attention to detail that is continually shown by IMCA teams are second-to-none, and we are honored to continue this partnership for the upcoming season.”All Kirkey awards will be presented during the national IMCA banquet in November. Information about seats and other Kirkey products is available at the www.kirkeyracing.com website, on Face­book or by calling 800 363-4885.“Kirkey has been steadfast in their support of IMCA racing and whether you are in the market for the safest containment or standard-style seat, we hope all IMCA racers will see what Kirkey has to offer first,” said Kevin Yoder, marketing director for the sanctioning body. “Their team has invaluable experience in keeping racers safe and we trust their line of products for any IMCA division.”last_img read more

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Smart Nigerians Seeking Easy Stay in Putin’s Country

first_imgDespite the fact that all African teams fell in the first round hurdles, some of the fans that came here for the tournament are still very much around. Some smart ones exploited the relaxed atmosphere to cross borders into some of the countries around Russia. Several others with no intentions to go back home have been making moves to hook Russian babes with the prospects of getting papers to stay.A Nigerian who has been resident in Moscow told THISDAY that Russia is not like any other European city where asylum is easy. “For you to get papers here, it takes more than getting hooked to a Russian girl here.Asylum is even more difficult as it is very rare for the authorities to grant someone coming from Africa. It may take years and even then, only the President has the power to grant that.” Given the scenario painted by this Nigerian who schooled here and has been living in the Russian capital city for more than 20 years, it remains to be seen how these our brothers will survive here.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

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Red Luncheon to Benefit County Historical Association

first_imgRUMSON – The annual Red – A Girlfriends’ Luncheon to benefit Monmouth County Historical Association will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 7, at the Rumson Country Club.A sold-out event last year, more than 200 women are expected to attend and enjoy lunch, boutique shopping, chance raffles and a display of porcelain teapots from the museum’s collection.“Now more than ever history matters. What better way to celebrate the friendships you value while supporting an important cause Monmouth County Historical Associa­tion,” said event chair Lynn Spector.A “chocolate chance” raffle will offer three chances to win and will add to the fun. Boutique vendors will offer a range of items from jewelry to pajamas to furs. Vendors include: Emily Faith Collection from California, Faye Kim Designs, Reilly & Me, Rugs by Anita, Sequin, Simply Fabulous Accessories, Sugs Jewelry, The Vanderbilt Gallery, The Veranda, Winters Furs, and more.Red also features a silent auction with donations from each vendor plus additional packages from local and New York City businesses.Tickets are available by calling the office at 732-462-1466 or online at www.monmouth history.org.last_img read more

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Atlantic Highlands and County Mull Traffic Fixes

first_imgBy John Burton |ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS — A resident-drafted plan intended to offer some traffic and parking relief for the borough’s First Avenue doesn’t have county officials’ support.“I’d say the plan would not gain county approval at this point,” said borough administrator Adam Hubeny.First Avenue, which is the borough’s main business thoroughfare, is a county roadway and comes under the county purview.Hubeny, Mayor Rhonda “Randi” Le Grice and Police Chief Jerry Vasto joined county engineers and representatives from the county Public Works Department earlier this month to discuss traffic, pedestrian and vehicular safety issues for the borough, particularly those facing the borough’s commercial district. During conversations with county representatives, the “loop proposal,” as it’s become known locally, came up. However, Le Grice acknowledged, county engineers rejected the proposal because the engineers felt it wasn’t in compliance with the county standards. “And the county found many flaws in the plan,” Hubeny acknowledged.Borough resident Mark Fisher undertook looking into the issue that has been increasingly of concern to borough officials: namely tackling traffic and insufficient parking along First Avenue.Fisher drew up a series of plans and accompanying PowerPoint presentations that involved making a portion of First Avenue one way moving east toward the municipal harbor and Seastreak commuter ferry dock. To compensate for that, Fisher’s plan would create a loop, having traffic on a portion of Hennessey Boulevard, a parallel street just north of First Avenue, flow one way in the opposite, westerly direction.In addition to the new traffic pattern, Fisher’s plan called for angling parking spaces on the one-way portions of First and Hennessey to 60 degrees. That, Fisher had said, would allow for additional spaces in the increasingly busy commercial district.The problem for county engineers, though, is that to allow angled parking would require a separate back-out lane, according to county guidelines. “And the street is just not wide enough for that,” Hubeny said.“I just get the feeling there aren’t too many one-way roads that have been approved by them,” Le Grice said, referring to county engineers, who seemed disinclined to allow one-way traffic. When Fisher’s proposal was introduced in May, Le Grice told The Two River Times she was intrigued, especially as it was a relatively easy and inexpensive way to increase parking and address congestion.“It is a big disappointment,” Fisher acknowledged, noting he had asked but wasn’t allowed to participate in the meeting earlier this month.Fisher isn’t a traffic engineer but said he had dedicated approximately 200 hours researching and drafting his plan, saying he wanted to offer some, however marginal, remedy. Like many residents, Fisher had become concerned about traffic safety and the parking spill over into residential neighborhoods adjacent to the commercial district, Le Grice explained.Le Grice said she and others will continue to consider installing angled parking on Hennessey Boulevard, since the borough does “have control over that.”Borough officials and county representatives discussed other traffic calming initiatives as speed humps, flashing pedestrian crossing lights (such as the one recently installed in the vicinity of Portland Pointe housing complex), additional crosswalks, and signage.“However,” Le Grice noted, “we have to come up with the money” for those measures.Monmouth County Engineer Joseph Ettore did not respond to repeated requests for an interview for this story.Le Grice said traffic enforcement will be ramped up to deal with speeding along the roadway. According to Fisher, when he had conducted a series of public presentations on his plan, questionnaires filled out by residents overwhelmingly said speeding and pedestrian safety were leading issues.As for parking, some spaces will be added at the eastern end of First Avenue by restriping in the area of the Hesse building, Le Grice said. But with substantial mixed-use residential and commercial developments moving forward in the district, more businesses coming into the community, and the demands for commuter parking for the ferry, Le Grice said parking is something that will have to be handled if progress is to continue.And that could mean talking about building a garage, the mayor added.“We got to have that conversation,” she said. “We got to look ahead.”This article was first published in the Aug. 24-31, 2017 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

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Ready, set, Golf

first_imgThe driving range at Granite Pointe is also open.”All 18 holes are open and ready to play,” said Granite Pointe spokesperson Barry Auliffe.Auliffe said the course looks in great shape with power carts available for golfers.On the North Shore, Balfour Golf and Country Club opens for full operations Friday, April 1.Club professional Craig Wilkinson said the course looks in fine shape and ready for golfers to take aim at the greens.Other courses already opened for the season include Birchbank in Trail, Christina Lake and Creston. Castlegar is also ready this weekend start the season. Granite Pointe at Nelson has joined many other courses in the region to announce opening for the 2016 golf season.Thursday, the Rosemont-based course kicked off the season with opening of all 18-holes.last_img read more

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USDA Hogs and Pigs Report Flash

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By DTN StaffOMAHA (DTN) — United States inventory of all hogs and pigs on March 1, 2019, was 74.3 million head. This was up 2% from March 1, 2018, but down slightly from Dec. 1, 2018, USDA reported on Thursday.Breeding inventory, at 6.35 million head, was up 2% from last year, and up slightly from the previous quarter.Market hog inventory, at 67.9 million head, was up 2% from last year, but down slightly from last quarter.The December-February 2019 pig crop, at 33.0 million head, was up 3% from 2018. Sows farrowing during this period totaled 3.08 million head, up 2% from 2018. The sows farrowed during this quarter represented 49% of the breeding herd. The average pigs saved per litter was a record high of 10.70 for the December-February period, compared to 10.58 last year.“Even though March 1 hog inventory was up from a year ago, total hog numbers slipped slightly from December levels,” said DTN Analyst Rick Kment. “Overall, hogs kept for breeding and marketing increased 2%, focusing on steady growth in all segments of production. This increase in itself is not likely to be a significant market mover, but the extreme volatility already in the complex could cause moderate-to-strong price pressure based on the emotional nature of the market. This could potentially lead to further drops in prices at the end of the month.”To view the full Quarterly Hogs and Pigs report, visit https://www.nass.usda.gov/…201920182019 aspercentof 2018(1,000 head)(1,000 head)(percent)All Hogs March 174,29672,748102Kept for Breeding6,3496,210102Kept for Marketing67,94866,538102WEIGHT BREAKDOWNUnder 50 lbs.21,45620,94210250-119 lbs.18,63918,212102120-179 lbs.15,26814,996102180 lbs. and over12,58512,387102FARROWINGS/INTENTIONS*Dec-Feb3,0843,034102Mar-May*3,1193,100101Jun-Aug*3,1913,200100Winter Pig Crop32,99932,101103(number)(number)(percent)Dec-Feb Pigs per Litter10.7010.58101(AG)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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