Panthers lacking consistency in losing streak

first_imgPittsburgh running back Isaac Bennett (34) catches a pass in front of Virginia linebacker Daquan Romero (13) during the second half of an NCAA college football game in Charlottesville, Va., Saturday, Oct. 4, 2014. Virginia won the game 24-19. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) – Chad Voytik made several big plays, but Virginia just made more.The junior quarterback threw for two touchdowns, hit Tyler Boyd for 34 yards on a third-and-10 and hit Isaac Bennett for 17 yards on a third-and-10, but he said it was the plays Pittsburgh didn’t make in between that were to blame for their third consecutive loss, 24-19 to Virginia on Saturday night.“It all comes down to executing, whether it’s momentum or big plays. That’s key in football,” said Voytik, who finished 16 for 30 for 195 yards despite being sacked four times and pressured all night.“I think that’s what’s been evident. We are rolling, making big plays, that’s when things are happening. It’s just a domino effect. We just need to connect all the different phases on the field,” he said.Voytik wasn’t without mistakes of his own. He threw an interception that Max Valles returned 35 yards for a touchdown in Virginia’s 21-point second quarter, and missed several open receivers.The Panthers (3-3, 1-1 Atlantic Coast Conference) don’t have long to fix things. They return to Virginia Thursday to play Virginia Tech at Lane Stadium in another Coastal Division battle.“Everybody loses something. We’ve lost three straight,” linebacker Todd Thomas said. “We can’t take it back, so we just have to pick our heads up and get ready for Virginia Tech. We just have to work.”Getting their defense back to the way it started the season would help.Kevin Parks ran for a career-high 169 yards and a long touchdown for the Cavaliers (4-2, 2-0), who piled up 225 rushing yard against a team that arrived at Scott Stadium allowing just 107 per game.The Cavaliers built a 24-3 lead by halftime, then held on. Virginia also limited James Conner, who arrived third in the country with an average of 158 yards per game and second with nine touchdowns, to 83 yards on 21 carries. Twice they stuffed him on runs inside the 4 yard-line.The Panthers got a long punt return from Tyler Boyd and a touchdown pass from Voytik to J.P. Holtz with 1:27 remaining to get within 24-19, but Voytik’s 2-point conversion pass attempt was batted down.Virginia seemed well on its way to a big victory until its momentum evaporated in the third quarter.They took the kickoff, were forced to punt and it was blocked by Dontez Ford, and the Panthers took possession at Virginia’s 31. Five plays later, Voytik hit Manasseh Garner for 17 yards and the touchdown.Virginia drove to midfield on the ensuing possession, but when Matt Johns rolled right and tried an off-balance throw downfield to Taquan Mizzell, Pat Amara intercepted and Pitt took over at its 33.The Panthers drove to a first-and-goal at the Cavaliers 4, but Virginia’s defense stiffened with the aid of a false start penalty, and Chris Blewitt’s 24-yard field goal pulled Pittsburgh to within 24-13.The stand seemed to be the wake-up call the Cavaliers’ defense needed.The false start penalty was one of four against the Panthers in the game.Virginia had seemingly broken the game open with 21 points in a span of 8:11 in the second quarter.Parks followed Johns’ 19-yard completion to Miles Gooch with a 48-yard run off the left side for a touchdown. It was Parks’ longest run of the year and put him on his way to 115 yards by halftime.After the Panthers’ fourth punt of the half, Virginia drove 78 yards in nine plays. The drive was highlighted by a lateral that Johns threw to Gooch, a former quarterback, and Gooch’s 28-yard pass to Zach Swanson that moved the ball to the Pitt 4. Johns’ swing pass for 3 yards to Khalek Shepherd three plays later pushed the lead to 17-3, and Virginia’s pressure on Voytik helped it grow again a minute later.Pressured, Voytik threw for Conner, but Max Valles stepped in front of the pass for the interception and ran 35 yards untouched to the end zone. It was the Cavaliers’ 19th takeaway of the season, and the ensuing extra point gave them 72 points off those plays; Last year, they scored 13 off 21 takeaways.—Follow Hank on twitter at: http://twitter.com/hankkurzjrlast_img read more

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Experience Olympia & Beyond Receives Industry Accreditation

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Experience Olympia & BeyondExperience Olympia & Beyond was awarded the Destination Marketing Accreditation Program (DMAP) seal along with other destinations at the Destinations International conference. The accreditation program by Destinations International recognizes the organization’s commitment to industry excellence and meeting the industry standard for performance and accountability of destination organizations around the world.From left: CEO Shauna Stewart, Director of Sales Jeff Bowe and Director of Marketing & Communications Moira Davin with Experience Olympia & Beyond receiving accreditation. Photo courtesy: Experience Olympia & Beyond“By achieving DMAP accreditation, these destination organizations have demonstrated that they have developed strategies for the direction of their destination and the policies and procedures to safeguard the use of public dollars,” said David Holder, CDME, DMAP Chair and Vice President – Tourism of JLL – Hospitality and Tourism Group.“We are pleased to have Experience Olympia & Beyond join our distinguished group of professionals,” said Don Welsh, President and CEO of Destinations International. “The industry distinction defines quality and performance standards for destination organizations and I look forward to welcoming them to the DMAP community.”The accreditation program requires a destination organization to successfully comply with a multitude of mandatory and voluntary standards that span a variety of performance areas to gain this momentous achievement. The standards cover nearly all aspects related to the management and marketing of destination organizations including governance, finance, human resources, sales, communications, destination development and research. Experience Olympia & Beyond joins the ranks of more than 200 destination organizations who have obtained DMAP recognition.“Our industry sets high standards and we are honored to officially be an accredited destination marketing organization. Our team and board have been dedicated to achieving this goal and worked tirelessly to make it happen. We are truly celebrating this accomplishment,” said Shauna Stewart, CEO of Experience Olympia & Beyond.Experience Olympia & Beyond recently went through a branding process which was a part of the accreditation and has launched a new brand, website, videos and product trails such as the South Sound Coffee Trail. The organization markets the destination to visitors, meeting planners, tour operators and sports event organizers.last_img read more

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Atlantic Highlands and County Mull Traffic Fixes

first_imgBy John Burton |ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS — A resident-drafted plan intended to offer some traffic and parking relief for the borough’s First Avenue doesn’t have county officials’ support.“I’d say the plan would not gain county approval at this point,” said borough administrator Adam Hubeny.First Avenue, which is the borough’s main business thoroughfare, is a county roadway and comes under the county purview.Hubeny, Mayor Rhonda “Randi” Le Grice and Police Chief Jerry Vasto joined county engineers and representatives from the county Public Works Department earlier this month to discuss traffic, pedestrian and vehicular safety issues for the borough, particularly those facing the borough’s commercial district. During conversations with county representatives, the “loop proposal,” as it’s become known locally, came up. However, Le Grice acknowledged, county engineers rejected the proposal because the engineers felt it wasn’t in compliance with the county standards. “And the county found many flaws in the plan,” Hubeny acknowledged.Borough resident Mark Fisher undertook looking into the issue that has been increasingly of concern to borough officials: namely tackling traffic and insufficient parking along First Avenue.Fisher drew up a series of plans and accompanying PowerPoint presentations that involved making a portion of First Avenue one way moving east toward the municipal harbor and Seastreak commuter ferry dock. To compensate for that, Fisher’s plan would create a loop, having traffic on a portion of Hennessey Boulevard, a parallel street just north of First Avenue, flow one way in the opposite, westerly direction.In addition to the new traffic pattern, Fisher’s plan called for angling parking spaces on the one-way portions of First and Hennessey to 60 degrees. That, Fisher had said, would allow for additional spaces in the increasingly busy commercial district.The problem for county engineers, though, is that to allow angled parking would require a separate back-out lane, according to county guidelines. “And the street is just not wide enough for that,” Hubeny said.“I just get the feeling there aren’t too many one-way roads that have been approved by them,” Le Grice said, referring to county engineers, who seemed disinclined to allow one-way traffic. When Fisher’s proposal was introduced in May, Le Grice told The Two River Times she was intrigued, especially as it was a relatively easy and inexpensive way to increase parking and address congestion.“It is a big disappointment,” Fisher acknowledged, noting he had asked but wasn’t allowed to participate in the meeting earlier this month.Fisher isn’t a traffic engineer but said he had dedicated approximately 200 hours researching and drafting his plan, saying he wanted to offer some, however marginal, remedy. Like many residents, Fisher had become concerned about traffic safety and the parking spill over into residential neighborhoods adjacent to the commercial district, Le Grice explained.Le Grice said she and others will continue to consider installing angled parking on Hennessey Boulevard, since the borough does “have control over that.”Borough officials and county representatives discussed other traffic calming initiatives as speed humps, flashing pedestrian crossing lights (such as the one recently installed in the vicinity of Portland Pointe housing complex), additional crosswalks, and signage.“However,” Le Grice noted, “we have to come up with the money” for those measures.Monmouth County Engineer Joseph Ettore did not respond to repeated requests for an interview for this story.Le Grice said traffic enforcement will be ramped up to deal with speeding along the roadway. According to Fisher, when he had conducted a series of public presentations on his plan, questionnaires filled out by residents overwhelmingly said speeding and pedestrian safety were leading issues.As for parking, some spaces will be added at the eastern end of First Avenue by restriping in the area of the Hesse building, Le Grice said. But with substantial mixed-use residential and commercial developments moving forward in the district, more businesses coming into the community, and the demands for commuter parking for the ferry, Le Grice said parking is something that will have to be handled if progress is to continue.And that could mean talking about building a garage, the mayor added.“We got to have that conversation,” she said. “We got to look ahead.”This article was first published in the Aug. 24-31, 2017 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

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Groves ready to add European belt to his title collection

first_imgGeorge Groves talks about his fight for the vacant European super-middleweight title, which takes place on 16 March at Wembley Arena. The unbeaten 24-year-old is the Commonwealth champion and previously held the British title. (Video courtesy of iFilm London)See also:Groves to fight for title at Wembley ArenaTrio in action on Groves’ Wembley bill Groves lining up world title challengeThe press conference to announce Groves’ Wembley returnGroves warned ahead of title showdownTrainer Booth discusses George Groves’ European title fightYTo4OntzOjk6IndpZGdldF9pZCI7czoyMDoid3lzaWphLW5sLTEzNTI0NjE4NjkiO3M6NToibGlzdHMiO2E6MTp7aTowO3M6MToiMyI7fXM6MTA6Imxpc3RzX25hbWUiO2E6MTp7aTozO3M6MjI6Ildlc3QgTG9uZG9uIFNwb3J0IGxpc3QiO31zOjEyOiJhdXRvcmVnaXN0ZXIiO3M6MTc6Im5vdF9hdXRvX3JlZ2lzdGVyIjtzOjEyOiJsYWJlbHN3aXRoaW4iO3M6MTM6ImxhYmVsc193aXRoaW4iO3M6Njoic3VibWl0IjtzOjMzOiJTdWJzY3JpYmUgdG8gb3VyIGRhaWx5IG5ld3NsZXR0ZXIiO3M6Nzoic3VjY2VzcyI7czoyODM6IlRoYW5rIHlvdSEgUGxlYXNlIGNoZWNrIHlvdXIgaW5ib3ggaW4gb3JkZXIgdG8gY29uZmlybSB5b3VyIHN1YnNjcmlwdGlvbi4gSWYgeW91IGRvbid0IHNlZSBhbiBlLW1haWwgZnJvbSB1cywgY2hlY2sgeW91ciBzcGFtIGZvbGRlci4gSWYgeW91IHN0aWxsIGhhdmVuJ3QgcmVjZWl2ZWQgYSBjb25maXJtYXRpb24gbWVzc2FnZSwgcGxlYXNlIGUtbWFpbCBmZWVkYmFja0B3ZXN0bG9uZG9uc3BvcnQuY29tIGFuZCB0ZWxsIHVzIHlvdSB3aXNoIHRvIHN1YnNjcmliZSB0byBvdXIgbmV3c2xldHRlci4iO3M6MTI6ImN1c3RvbWZpZWxkcyI7YToxOntzOjU6ImVtYWlsIjthOjE6e3M6NToibGFiZWwiO3M6NToiRW1haWwiO319fQ== Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Warriors report: Warriors struggling with fouls, turnovers and shooting in loss to Denver

first_imgDENVER – The Warriors arrived here wondering if they would have the stamina to handle the altitude. Instead, they realized their issues extend beyond early-season conditioning.Even though the Warriors boast Stephen Curry, Kevin Durant and Klay Thompson, they suddenly cannot make 3-pointers. Just like last season, the Warriors also have issues with collecting fouls and turnovers.Mix those ingredients up, and the Warriors’ 100-98 loss to the Denver Nuggets on Sunday provided an ugly snapshot …last_img

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Darwin’s Ethics: All and/or None

first_imgSeveral stories recently indicate that evolutionists not only want to control the non-tangible areas of study, such as ethics and morals, they want to prevent anyone else from having a say.Psychology:  License to sin – What would you think of a scientist who tempted people to sin so that he could observe their actions?  Yet that is what a team did to students, as reported by EurekAlert.  They found that “asking people to think about vice increases their likelihood of giving in.”  This should raise red flags about the ethics and limits of science.Theology: Drosophila philosophy – Believe it or not, an article on EurekAlert asks whether fruit flies have free will.  The article, about a study published on PLoS One, ponders what combination of chance and necessity (and only those ingredients) can explain the fly’s behavior.  Free will vs determinism has long been an issue discussed by theologians and philosophers.  Now, biologists are thinking they can give the definitive word.  Presumably, what applies to fruit flies applies to people as well.Genetic engineering: Age of the chimera – The BBC News reported that the British government has bowed to pressure from scientists and overturned prohibitions against human-animal hybrid experimentation.  An ethicist called this “appalling” and said, “This is a highly controversial and terrifying proposal, which has little justification in science and even less in ethics.  Endorsement by the UK government will elicit horror in Europe and right across the wider world.”    Proponents advertised hoped-for cures for genetic diseases, and argued it was “an area where these [chimeras] could be used for scientific benefit.”  According to The Guardian (UK), a geneticist said “I’m delighted that common sense has prevailed,” calling the hybrids just “cells on a dish.”Education: Warning signs – The scientific press is sounding an alarm: a Darwin skeptic who was on the Kansas school board is now running unopposed for a post in Washington on the National Association of State Boards of Education.  Science Daily had only negative things to say about this development.  It “has many evolution advocates concerned,” and Ken Miller (Brown U) responded, “any situation that provides an opportunity for the opponents of science education to advance their agenda is a matter of concern.”    This presupposes the Darwin supporters have no agenda.  It also asserts without proof that candidate Kenneth R. Willard opposes “science education” completely, and that only pro-evolutionists are in favor of science education.  If appointed, Kenneth R. Willard would not even start serving till January 2009.  He said in the Hutchinson News that evolution is not on the agenda of the NASBE, and he does not expect to bring it up.  Nevertheless, activists with Kansas Citizens for Science are urging a write-in campaign to oppose his election on the grounds he is “anti-education.”Education: Litmus Test – Astrobiologist Guillermo Gonzalez, co-author of The Privileged Planet, was denied tenure at Iowa State last week, not because he lacked publications (he exceeded the requirement by 350%), or because his scientific work was substandard (it was acclaimed by peers, see Evolution News), but because he is a “Darwin skeptic” who supports intelligent design.  The news about his tenure denial was widely reported: for more information, see Evolution News and its review of report in Nature on the case.History: Darwin letters opened – Want to read the innermost thoughts of Charles Darwin?  His letters have been posted on the web, announced the BBC News. Ideology: Biopolitics – Can evolutionary theory bring an end to the clash of ideologies?  Apparently psychologist John Jost (New York U) thinks so.  He is persuading colleagues that human tendencies to embrace various ideologies can be analyzed with equations.  See story on EurekAlert.Propaganda: Anti-evolutionism as anti-science – An article in Science1 tried to analyze the “childhood origins of adult anti-science behavior.”  Paul Bloom and Deena Skolnick Weisberg considered creationism and resistance to evolutionary theory as examples of anti-scientific attitudes, and portrayed them as childish behaviors that were not properly overcome through education.  Surprisingly, they admitted that common sense contributes to resistance to evolution.    They ended, “This is the current situation in the United States, with regard to the central tenets of neuroscience and evolutionary biology.  These concepts clash with intuitive beliefs about the immaterial nature of the soul and the purposeful design of humans and other animals, and (in the United States) these beliefs are particularly likely to be endorsed and transmitted by trusted religious and political authorities.”  The idea is that scientists and educators need to be aware of these “anti-science” tendencies in their efforts to teach science – a science that is congruent with materialistic neuroscience and evolution.    At Access Research Network, David Tyler wrote a lengthy critique of this article from an intelligent design perspective.Emotions: Darwin book redux – Another paper in Science2 resembled Darwin’s Book The Expression of Emotion in Man and Animals and even included the 1872 book as a reference.  In “Embodying Emotion,” Paula Niedenthal gave physicalistic interpretations of emotions in people and in animals.  Though she did not refer to evolutionary theory directly, her paper also lacked any reference to anything like a soul or spirit.  She said, “In particular, I discuss insights that have been stimulated by theories of embodied cognition and show how such theories account for the embodiment effects that you and Darwin might have been able to intuit.”Morals: Biological morality – Jonathan Haidt got a full-page press in Science3 for his ideas on moral evolution (see 05/17/2007).  “More research is needed on the collective and religious parts of the moral domain, such as loyalty, authority, and spiritual purity,” he said, but it is clear in his paper that he meant all these things have an evolutionary basis, and zero epistemic authority.    For instance, he said, “From prokaryotes to eukaryotes, from single-celled organisms to plants and animals, and from individual animals to hives, colonies, and cooperative groups, the simple rules of Darwinian evolution never change, but the complex game of life changes when radically new kinds of players take the field.”  From here he launched into a discussion of the morality exhibited by ants.    Later, he remarked, “because morality may be as much a product of cultural evolution as genetic evolution, it can change substantially in a generation or two.”  That’s a clear statement of moral relativism.  Throughout his paper, evolution was one of the most prominent and common words.These sample articles make clear that evolution is a complete package.  From a big bang to the death of the universe, the evolutionary world view seeks to encompass every concept, even the immaterial ones like love, morality, and world views themselves.  When anyone tries to offer a different perspective that does not embrace evolution’s underlying materialism, the alarms are sounded.  Pro-evolutionists employ “scientific” morality, whatever it is, to label the challenge anti-science, anti-education, and just plain wrong.1Paul Bloom and Deena Skolnick Weisberg, “Paul Bloom and Deena Skolnick Weisberg,” Science, 18 May 2007: Vol. 316. no. 5827, pp. 996-997, DOI: 10.1126/science.1133398.2Paula M. Niedenthal, “Embodying Emotion,” Science, 18 May 2007: Vol. 316. no. 5827, pp. 1002-1005, DOI: 10.1126/science.1136930.3Jonathan Haidt, “The New Synthesis in Moral Psychology,” Science, 18 May 2007: Vol. 316. no. 5827, pp. 998-1002, DOI: 10.1126/science.1137651.And so, pray tell, how would they know it is wrong?  Right and wrong are judgments about truths that are immaterial.  If morals emerge from particles in motion, they are not morals at all: they are temporary, arbitrary trends of collectives of objects.  If you base an argument on something arbitrary, you can prove anything – including the idea that materialism is false.  Christian theists, by contrast, can prove something is right or wrong, because their presuppositions include the notion of eternal truths and laws of logic.    Evolutionism is not a science.  It is a world view.  It is a silly world view that refutes itself, because it cannot generate intangibles like morals and truths by appeals to particles in motion.  Any one of the appeals to “science” that the evolutionist uses to defend its brand of morality, rationality or ideology is a two-edged sword.  Using the same arguments, a skilled debater can turn the tables and tie the Darwinist in intellectual knots.For instance, moral relativism is a capitulation to the idea that anything goes.  But if anything goes, then calling anything immoral in any context is bad if the majority likes it – such as creationism.  Furthermore, attacking moral relativism itself can be good if the majority so desires – which refutes the idea that morals are relative.  Q.E.D.You can’t get moral blood out of a materialist turnip.  The same goes for truths, laws of logic, and consciousness.    Once you understand this, and watch how the radical Darwinists intrude into every area of scholarship, including fundamental issues far beyond biology, you see why the radical Darwinists are a threat: a threat to rationality, to morality, to education, and to civilization itself.  Their own words condemn them.(Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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10 months agoCardiff boss Warnock finds Zohore positive in Man Utd defeat

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Cardiff boss Warnock finds Zohore positive in Man Utd defeatby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveCardiff City boss Neil Warnock found a positive in Ken Zohore’s return for their thrashing by Manchester United.He suggested the Dane, if back to his best, could boost Cardiff’s January transfer search for a new striker.“I was pleased our ‘new signing’ Ken Zohore played quite well today, I have been waiting for that for three months,” he said.“He’s trained really well and looks more like himself from last year. That has been a massive plus for me.“If he plays well it helps our search for a striker, as it is not the most important thing if he plays like that.“But if on January 31 he goes back to how he has been, I’ve got problems! I need him to set his stall out and show me what he can do.” last_img read more

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a month agoPSG coach Thomas Tuchel linked with Man Utd

first_imgPSG coach Thomas Tuchel linked with Man Utdby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the lovePSG coach Thomas Tuchel is being linked with Manchester United.United sees him as an alternative to Ole Gunnar Solskjaer should the Red Devils boss fail to improve results, says Le 10 Sport.The Old Trafford-based club gave Solskjaer a three-year contract just six months ago.Barcelona are also interested in hiring PSG boss Tuchel.The Red Devils failed to qualify for this season’s Champions League last campaign in which Solskjaer took over half way through. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img

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Alberta government contract to result in three new solar power plants

first_imgCALGARY, A.B. – The Alberta government is granting a 20-year contract to supply about half of its electric power needs to a partnership that plans to build three new solar power plants for more than $100 million.Environment and Parks Minister Shannon Phillips says the contract to supply about 55 percent of the government’s annual power consumption will shave $3.9 million per year from the current expiring contracts.She says the winning bid of 4.8 cents per kilowatt-hour by 50-50 partners Canadian Solar Solutions Inc. of Guelph, Ont., and Conklin Metis Local 193 of southern Alberta was selected from 19 companies through a competitive procurement process. John Gorman, CEO of the Canadian Solar Industries Association, said during the announcement the power price is so low it’s “almost unbelievable,” adding it is less than the average cost of building natural gas-powered power generation.Ryan Tourigny, director of development for Canadian Solar, says construction on the three plants at Hays, Jenner and Tilley in southern Alberta will begin in early 2020 and are expected to come on stream in 2021.The plants are to produce about 94 megawatts at peak times, enough to power about 20,000 homes, and about 270 jobs will be created during construction.last_img read more

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Pattinson doesn’t like to do similar roles

first_imgLos Angeles: Actor Robert Pattinson doesn’t like to play the same characters over and over again as he judges his performance and it makes him feel “really self-conscious”. “I feel like as soon as I repeat myself even a little bit, I suddenly get really self-conscious. If you are pushing something out into the unknown a little bit, you can’t judge yourself, because you don’t really know what you’re doing. “Even with a voice I can’t really do it more than once, because then I think, ‘Oh, this is my acting voice.’ That’s why I can’t even do anything in my normal accent, because it doesn’t feel like I’m working,” he told Little White Lies magazine. Also Read – I have personal ambitions now: PriyankaThe 32-year-old actor felt pigeonholed at the start of his career, reports femalefirst.co.uk. He said: “When I first started … if you’re tall and have floppy hair and a posh accent, they’re like ‘Period dramas!’ And then you’re exclusively in the period dramas box. “I was like, ‘No! I don’t want to do period dramas!’ I’ve done a couple, and as soon as I put on the high Edwardian collar, I’m like, ‘Ughhh’. Your costume is out-acting you at all times.”last_img read more

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