All Blacks retain the Bledisloe Cup with convincing win over Australia

first_imgSunday Aug 7, 2011 All Blacks retain the Bledisloe Cup with convincing win over Australia There was a special feeling at Eden Park as the All Blacks defeated the Wallabies 30-14 in front of an expectant Auckland crowd, retaining the Bledisloe Cup and putting themselves in a great position to take the 2011 Tri Nations title. Yesterday there were a number on internationals taking place, with some sides looking more impressive than others. In fact, perhaps the All Blacks (of the New Zealand variety) were the only side that looked like anything worthy of taking the big title in a few months time. They’re yards ahead of the opposition at this stage. But, that is what these warm up games, and the Tri Nations, are all about. The Wallabies were outplayed, and despite scoring a brilliant try through Digby Ioane, and a consolation try to flatter the scoreline, they were off the pace. New Zealand on the other hand, looked possessed, tackling everything that moved. They made 116 tackles, missing just 21. Conrad Smith was playing on another level, while for Australia, Will Genia and Quade Cooper seemed anonymous behind a pack that wasn’t getting much go-forward. In many ways it looked like a dress rehearsal for the World Cup for them, and if they play like for the next two months, will be very tough to beat in front of their home crowd. Maintaining that level of intensity will be the challenge, and a fascinating prospect for rugby fans around the globe. For now though, they’re in the driving seat of this Tri Nations campaign, way out in front on 9 points having played two and won two. They will play South Africa in two weeks time, before returning to New Zealand to face the Wallabies again on 27 August. We’ll have highlights of the rest of yesterday’s games shortly.Time: 04:05 ADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Tri Nations 2011 Related Articles 511 WEEKS AGO The Wallabies take the Tri Nations in thriller… 512 WEEKS AGO Springboks get morale boosting win over the… 512 WEEKS AGO Courageous Wallabies beat the Springboks… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedGranny Stuns Doctors by Removing Her Wrinkles with This Inexpensive TipSmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier Living10 Types of Women You Should Never MarryNueeyYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueey30+ Everyday Items with a Secret Hidden PurposeNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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Certain symptoms may predict fatal foodborne botulism

first_imgAug 20, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – A distinctive group of symptoms—shortness of breath, impaired gag reflex, and absence of diarrhea—may be predictive of severe outcomes, including death, from foodborne botulism, a group of researchers reported recently. Varma JK, Katsitadze G, Moiscrafishvili M, et al. Signs and symptoms predictive of death in patients with foodborne botulism—Republic of Georgia, 1980-2002. Clin Infect Dis 2004 Aug 1;39(3):357-62 [Full text] Patients were considered to have botulism if this was listed as the final diagnosis. A trained epidemiologist completed a form about each patient that included patient demographic characteristics; medical history; history of present illness; physical examination findings at admission; clinical course, including complications, adverse reactions, and death; suspected source of disease; and results of laboratory tests. Classification and regression tree (CART) analysis was used to find clinical syndromes at presentation that were predictive of survival or death. In an analysis limited to patient age, signs, and symptoms, it was found that a history of shortness of breath or vomiting and normal facial muscle strength on physical examination at admission was 100% predictive of survival (odds ratio for death, 0%, P<.01). The clinical syndrome most predictive of death included shortness of breath, impaired gag reflex, and absence of diarrhea; patients who died were 22.6 times more likely to have this syndrome than were those who survived (95% confidence interval, 22-48). Because botulism is among the diseases considered most likely for use as a bioterrorist weapon, any clues to outcome, such as those in this study, could be useful in triage in a mass-casualty setting. For example, in such an emergency situation, rapid transport to a facility providing higher-level care might be justifiably reserved for patients with the triad of symptoms identified as predictive of death.center_img The most common symptoms at admission were found to be fatigue (90%), muscle weakness (89%), and difficulty swallowing (81%). Ophthalmoplegia, ptosis, and slurred speech were the most common physical examination findings, present in 79%, 76%, and 58% of patients, respectively. Among the 705 patients for whom final outcome was known, 54 (8%) died. The group of symptoms classically considered to be predictive of botulism—nausea and vomiting; dysphasia; diplopia; dry mouth; and fixed, dilated pupils, was present in only 2% of patients. The authors point out a number of limitations to their study and stress that validation outside of Georgia is needed. The authors, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Center of Disease Control, Tbilisi, Republic of Georgia, collected data from the medical records of 706 patients hospitalized in the Republic of Georgia with botulism from 1980 through 2002. The country has the highest reported incidence of foodborne botulism in the world (0.9 cases per 100,000 population), according to the report.last_img read more

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