Shhh. Listen to opportunity knocking

first_imgSkip Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies Are… You Might Like America’s optimism brings hope to all Sometimes, perception leads to reality … or at least a perceived reality. And, as any business leader will tell you,… read more Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson By The Penny Hoarder We were opportunity knocking.But now that we live in an electronic world, the World Book company has probably gone bankrupt and kids are wired to the World Wide Web instead of having their noses buried in books.But, from time to time, opportunity comes knocking and, when it does, some folks still run like scared rabbits.Several years ago when the Brundidge Historical Society decided to expand what it does at the We Piddle Around Theater to include storytelling, folks ran. They didn’t want to sit and listen to people tell stories. Book Nook to reopen Latest Stories Published 7:38 pm Saturday, January 24, 2009 Shhh. Listen to opportunity knocking Print Article If you’ve ever tried to sell World Book Encyclopedias door-to-door, then you’ll know exactly what I’m talking about.Folks run from you.For several years, Sis and I “tried” to sell World Books and Child Crafts to friends and neighbors. Soon, we didn’t have any friends and our neighbors kept their doors locked and the window shades down. Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Email the author Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Sponsored Content By Jaine Treadwell Folks would actually dart out into traffic to get on the opposite side of the street from us, and we didn’t get invited to Tupperware parties anymore.Why, you would have thought that we were runaways from a leper colony.But, we actually believed that we were offering folks a much-needed service. Children needed the Child Craft to spur their interest in reading and satisfy their curiosity about many subjects. Older kids needed World Books for enlightenment and research. In my limited wisdom, I didn’t understand that.I grew up listening to stories. That was my only entertainment, except for the radio, the Saturday picture show and an occasional all-night singing.Mama and I listened to the Grand Ole Opry every Saturday night and, when there was an all-night singing at the Brundidge school auditorium, we went with Bubba tagging along. When he fell asleep, we would take him home and put him to bed, where Daddy had been since the sun went down. Mama and I would go back and stay until the last note was sung.Between those times, my only entertainment was listening to stories told mostly by Eunice, Amos, Lizzy and the other folks that lived in the tenant houses on my granddaddy’s “place.”In the late afternoons, I would make my way to Eunice’s kitchen and rob the oven in her wood stove of a baked sweet potato or a pone of cornbread and find a listening place on her front porch.Pop always said, “Shhh! Be quiet and listen. You never learn anything when you’re talking.” So, I did a lot more listening than talking while “loitering” on the rough wood floor of that ol’ porch. And, perhaps, the most important thing I learned was to listen.I learned to listen to the different sounds of their voices. I love the way that Amos could turn a phrase and the way those wonderful ladies said things in ways that I’d never heard before. I loved the pictures they painted in my mind with words.Listening opened a world of wonder for me. The sounds of birds singing, the whirr of the cotton gin, the babble of a creek, the sound of rain on the roof and the sound of a cold, dark night.So, no. I didn’t understand when folks said, “I don’t want to sit and listen to people tell stories.”But with a little arm-twisting and a whole lot of begging door-to-door, the first Pike Piddlers Storytelling Festival in 2007 was a great success. Folks “didn’t know it would be like that!” They were amazed that they could be entertained with words.My daughter, who was the most doubting Thomas, said listening to Donald Davis was like watching a movie. She could see the pictures in her mind. Her pictures …not some that had been created by a Hollywood movie producer. Her pictures.That’s the beauty of storytelling.We each create the pictures in our mind and they are unlike those created by anyone else. So storytelling becomes a very personal art and every listener an artist.Next weekend, the Brundidge Historical Society will bring four of the top storytellers in the country to the stage of the We Piddle Around Theater and the Trojan Center Theater.Kathryn Tucker Windham — and I dare not call her a legend – at age 90, will be back, as will Donald Davis. Those two are the masters of storytelling. “It just don’t get no better than that.”Joining them will be two incredible storytellers, Carmen Agra Deedy and Bil Lepp, both are repeat tellers at the National Storytelling Festival in Jonesborough, Tenn. Deedy, like Davis, is high energy, so hold on to your seat. Lepp is laid-back but then most all “liars” are. Aleta Davis of Montgomery will also take the stage Friday night and folks will leave amazed at what she can do.There’s an old adage that says you can’t know where you are going unless you know where you’ve been.It’s through the oral tradition that we have learned who we are as a country, as a community, as families and as individuals.And, those stories have been passed down because someone said, “Shhh! Be quiet and listen.”I’m still listening.Jaine Treadwell can be reached at [email protected] Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Acid Reflux (Watch Now)Healthy LifestyleIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthMost 10 Rarest Skins for FortniteTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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NYSUT Sues New York State Over Reductions Of School Aid

first_imgImage by Matt Hummel / WNY News Now.ALBANY — New York State United Teachers has filed a lawsuit against New York State over reductions in state school aid for districts across the state, seeking the release of money withheld in July, August and September and an injunction against future withholding of or delayed school funding payments.The lawsuit filed in Albany County Supreme Court challenges the constitutionality of the unilateral executive budgetary powers provided for the state Division of Budget as part of this year’s state budget process. The union alleges that those unconstitutional powers have led to cuts that deprive students of their right to a sound basic education under the state Constitution.The suit argues school districts have no more local resources to tap and are dependent on state funding. In such districts, a 20 percent cut “could be catastrophic, and certainly would lead to a ‘gross and glaring inadequacy.’”NYSUT has previously highlighted the devastation stemming from state cuts, including hundreds of layoffs in districts around New York. “Time is up,” NYSUT President Andy Pallotta said. “With the loss of state funding driving cuts at the local level in districts around the state, we can’t just keep waiting for action at the federal level to fund our schools. At this point, a lawsuit unfortunately is the necessary next step to compel our leaders to do what’s right: Fund our future and stop these cuts.”NYSUT argues that the Executive Branch’s budget reduction authority violates the separation of powers in the state Constitution and is an unconstitutional delegation of the Legislature’s constitutional oversight and policy-making powers. But, in the absence of federal action, the Division of Budget began withholding 20 percent of selected local aid payments in June, according to the Fiscal Year 2021 First Quarterly State Budget Financial Plan Update.In the short term, continuing to withhold 20 percent of the funding appropriated would cause further issues with significant education-related payments the state makes this month, including a roughly $2.5 billion payment to school districts on Sept. 30.In the lawsuit, NYSUT points to the state’s ability to draw upon approximately $7 billion in reserves and settlement funds to avoid draconian cuts. The union also has advocated for other solutions to help fund public education, including taxes on the ultrawealthy and additional federal stimulus funding.School districts across the state are considering or making staffing cuts that only serve to reduce student access to academic and other essential services, the lawsuit argues.“Our students and families deserve better than staffing and program cuts just as we begin a new school year with unprecedented challenges,” Pallotta said. “A high-quality education is a vital service that’s central to helping communities thrive. It’s about time it was funded like one.” Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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