IEA: Global coal demand to fall in 2019, remain roughly flat to 2024

first_imgIEA: Global coal demand to fall in 2019, remain roughly flat to 2024 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Guardian:Global demand for coal has fallen this year for the first time in two years as Europe and the U.S. turn their backs on coal-fired power plants in favour of cheap gas and renewable energy.A report from the International Energy Agency (IEA) found that the world’s appetite for coal declined in 2019 after a two-year resurgence following the steepest ever drop in the use of coal-fired power plants. The world’s energy watchdog said it is too soon to say whether the global appetite for coal would continue to decline because the fate of the industry rests largely in the hands of China’s policymakers.Coal remains the world’s single largest source of electricity generation, half of which is produced in China and used to power Chinese power plants.The IEA’s annual report on the coal industry revealed that the largest ever decline in the use of coal-fired electricity was led by steep cuts in coal demand from Europe and the U.S. Western countries are weaning their energy systems off coal power due to abundant cheaper alternatives such as renewable energy and gas, and flatlining energy demand.The IEA expects coal-fired electricity to rise only marginally between 2020 and 2024, at less than 1% a year, which should see its share of the global electricity mix fall to 35% in 2024 from 38% last year.But the forecasts could deviate widely, depending on China’s energy policy decisions in its next five-year plan, covering 2021 to 2025. The fossil fuel faces rising public opposition due to concerns over air pollution and the climate crisis. Many governments are now considering stronger climate and environmental policies as renewables and gas become cheaper to use. “If China changes – everything changes,” [Keisuke Sadamori, a director at the IEA] said.[Jillian Ambrose]More: World demand for coal falls despite growth in Asialast_img read more

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Badgers look for IU sweep

first_imgSenior guard Jason Bohannon and the Badgers are not taking the Hoosiers lightly as they travel south to Bloomington Thursday.[/media-credit]Heading down to Indiana, the Wisconsin men’s basketball team faces a must-win game Thursday if it is to fulfill a preseason goal.No, not to win the Big Ten title — although this game is absolutely crucial for any chance of accomplishing that for the third time in Bo Ryan’s career — but to reach a .500 record in road games this season.Currently sitting at 3-5 for true road games this season, the Badgers have two contests left to even up the left column with the right.While a goal of .500 may seem underwhelming on the surface, Ryan believes winning as many as you lose away from home is a strong achievement in any year.“[The road] has plagued everybody, it always has, it always will, so we are no different,” Ryan said. “We don’t obsess about it. If you can come anywhere close to .500 on the road over a long period of time, anyone will tell you that is hard to do.”The Hoosiers have gone 2-5 at home in conference play this season and have lost their last eight Big Ten games. Making the struggles worse, IU has fallen by an average of 14.6 points per game during the losing streak.With a 9-17 record for the year, Indiana has struggled both offensively — only Verdell Jones III and Christian Watford average double-digit points — and defensively, where the Hoosiers give up 70 points per game in the walk-it-up Big Ten.Still, the Badgers know anything is possible on the road, and per usual, are preparing in the same vein as always.“Anytime you are going to an opponent’s home court, you know it is going to be a tough game,” Bohannon said. “They are a very tough team at home… when they get hot, they are as good as anyone.”Against the smaller Hoosiers, the Badgers could have success inside working the ball to the recently reactivated Jon Leuer.The junior forward struggled in his first game out, shooting a poor 2-for-12 in a loss at Minnesota. Leuer responded with a much more efficient game against Northwestern last Sunday, finishing with 11 points on 3-for-5 shooting and three crucial blocks.Although many believe the Badgers will make a concerted effort to force-feed Leuer in the post, Bohannon says nothing will change with the return of their most effective interior player.Wherever shots open up, that is where the Wisconsin offense will go.“I don’t see any reason why we would want to change our mindset or anything,” Bohannon said. “We have been successful the way we have been playing… we still want to get the ball in the post, and maybe we haven’t done that as well as we should, but we are still keeping the same keys as in the past.”One of the most successful parts of the Badger offense in recent games has been the emergence of Bohannon as a go-to offensive threat.Portrayed for much of his career as a spot up shooter, Bohannon has been much more effective with the ball in his hands this season. Starting with the win over Michigan State, Bohannon has been on a tear for perhaps the best six-game stretch in his career, averaging 19.5 points per game and shooting over 50 percent from the field in every contest.Besides a surge of confidence, Bohannon’s success can be credited to developing a pull-up jumper, making him a more dynamic threat to guard.“I think J-Bo realized if he doesn’t have one of those he is in trouble,” Ryan said of Bohannon’s step back jumper. “When is the last time you saw him blow by somebody? He knows that — I’m not being critical, I’m just a realist — good players keep working on the next move. Good offensive players always find a counter.”last_img read more

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