London Odds & Ends: Lin-Manuel Miranda to Star in Hamilton & More

first_imgLin-Manuel Miranda in ‘Hamilton'(Photo: Joan Marcus) Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today from London. Lin-Manuel Miranda to Eventually Star in HamiltonLooks like Lin-Manuel Miranda will be in the room where it happens in London! According to the Daily Mail, he will join the West End cast of Hamilton in 2018 or 2019. As previously reported, his hit tuner is set to open at the refurbished Victoria Palace Theatre in the West End in October 2017. As if you weren’t already aware, the acclaimed, Pulitzer Prize, Grammy and presumably Tony-winning show is playing at the Richard Rodgers Theatre.Carlyss Peer Tapped for B’way-Bound Groundhog DayBroadway.com has confirmed that Carlyss Peer will star opposite Main Stem favorite Andy Karl in the Great White Way-bound Groundhog Day. The RADA-trained actress will play TV producer Rita in the musical from Tim Minchin and Danny Rubin (who also penned the movie). Directed by Matthew Warchus and choreographed by Peter Darling, the production will make its world premiere at London’s Old Vic on July 11; the Broadway transfer is scheduled to start previews on January 23, 2017.Ruth Wilson Will Headline Hedda GablerThe Affair’s Ruth Wilson, who was Tony nominated for Constellations last year, will return to the stage in Hedda Gabler, the Daily Mail writes. Ivo Van Hove, whose New York stage credits this season alone include The Crucible, David Bowie’s Lazarus and A View From the Bridge, will direct the previously reported National Theatre’s revival of Ibsen’s classic. Performances will begin at the Lyttleton Theatre in December. View Commentslast_img read more

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Wyoming Governor Says State Will ‘Double Down’ on Coal

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Christopher Coats for SNL:After two of the country’s largest coal producers announced hundreds of layoffs at Wyoming mines, the state’s political leadership responded with pledges of support and long-term services but few immediate solutions for the battered local industry.Late last week, Arch Coal Inc. and Peabody Energy Corp. announced cuts in staff at some of the country’s largest mines, citing an array of market and regulatory challenges that have weighed down the state’s struggling coal industry. A representative for the Campbell County Chamber of Commerce, near where the mines are located, told S&P Global Market Intelligence that further staff reductions had occurred in the area in recent months.Wyoming’s Republican Gov. Matt Mead responded to the layoffs and broader downturn hours after the reductions had been announced, calling a press conference to announce a “rapid response team” of state officials intended to help those communities impacted by the job losses.Mead went on to outline the host of challenges facing the state’s coal industry, noting that warmer-than-expected winter temperatures had dashed any hope of a recovery in demand this year. Further, coal export projects intended to allow Powder River Basin coal to reach the Asian market had met with further delays and resistance from coastal states.A few days after Mead’s press conference, the likelihood of new coal export projects continued to erode with news that the developers behind the Gateway Pacific project in Washington had paused its environmental review of the project.Despite those obstacles, Mead repeated plans to “double down” on his efforts to ensure that Wyoming coal has a future, including a pledge to continue his fight against Obama administration environmental regulations and support access to export markets. In 2015, Mead signed new bond legislation that would provide a billion dollars for infrastructure outside of the state. While the state law allows financial backing for any infrastructure projects outside of Wyoming, coal export terminals including the Gateway Pacific project have received the most attention since the Wyoming Infrastructure Authority received authority over such projects in 2014.Wyo. governor promises support for coal layoffs, warns of long-term challenges Wyoming Governor Says State Will ‘Double Down’ on Coallast_img read more

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Top seed Kerber knocked out of French Open

first_imgBy John StonestreetPARIS,(Reuters)-World number one Angelique Kerber’s nightmare season hit a new low on Sunday when, with expectations weighing heavily after a stellar 2016, she was dumped out of the French Open 6-2 6-2 by 40th-ranked Ekaterina Makarova.The German became the first top seeded woman to lose in the opening round of the French Open since the sport turned professional in 1968 — and the disparity between the players in her Russian opponent’s favour was as wide as the scoreline suggests.Cutting a troubled figure on court a world away from the feisty baseliner who last season battled her way to two grand slam titles, Kerber lacked the pace and power to trouble her fellow left-hander.Kerber, 29, has struggled this year, withdrawing from the Madrid Open with a thigh injury and going down in straight sets to qualifier Anna Kontaveit in Rome.But Sunday’s setback – albeit on a surface for which she has no great affection, having made an opening-round exit in Paris last year – threatens to leave her season in tatters.That picture offers the starkest of contrasts with a spectacular 2016 that also brought her major wins in the Australian and U.S. Opens.“Last year it was a completely different year. I mean, the pressure is always there,” she told a news conference.“This year the expectations are much bigger, especially in the big tournaments… and the expectations are also from me really big, of course, because I know what I can do.”The German will be happy to leave Roland Garros behind, and hope to rediscover a game in which several cylinders are misfiring in time for Wimbledon, where she finished runner-up last year.“Right now I think that I have to find to myself again and just trying to forgot the claycourt season as soon as possible,” she said.Makarova – who had won four of her previous 11 encounters with Kerber – was making her first singles appearance on the Philippe Chatrier centre court as well as fighting against history.But, arriving at Roland Garros high on confidence after having beaten Agnieszka Radwanska and Dominika Cibulkova on clay this year, she held her nerve to close out the match in a final game that featured five deuce points.“I was also fighting with my emotions not to wait for a mistake (by Kerber),” she said courtside.The Russian had imposed herself early in the first set, hitting a series of blistering forehand winners down both wings that Kerber often struggled to reach.After briefly threatening a recovery in the eighth game, in which she held two break points, Kerber meekly surrendered the first set with a forehand that never looked like clearing the net.The German dropped serve in the next game, with Makarova hitting another four clean forehand winners to consolidate her hold on the match.last_img read more

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