U.S. Supreme Court asked to review South Carolina property decision

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET South Carolina Course Director Jerusalem, Israel New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Ron Caldwell says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Ron Caldwell says: February 15, 2018 at 11:18 am News update. The Episcopal Church in South Carolina announced today that federal Judge Richard Gergel has lifted the stay in the case before him. It had been on stay since Aug. 30, 2017, as part of a mediation process. This means the federal case of VonROSENBERG V. LAWRENCE will proceed in the U.S. District Court, in Charleston. The Church side is arguing that Lawrence is in violation of federal trademark laws as he claims to be the legitimate bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina. It appears that a trail in the federal court will be held later this year. Comments (3) Property, Press Release Service By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Feb 14, 2018 Submit an Event Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK February 14, 2018 at 2:47 pm The basic issue between the two sides has been settled by the SC supreme court. The majority of the court ruled (Aug. 2, 2018 and reaffirmed Nov. 17, 2018) that the Episcopal Church and the Church diocese hold trust control over 29 of the 36 parishes in question. Since then, the independent diocese has used three tactics in a strategy to of delay the implementation of the decision: 1-use of federal court ordered mediation. The federal judge ordered this on Aug. 30. Three meetings have taken place over five months with no sign of progress; 2-the independent diocese filed a new lawsuit in state circuit court claiming payment from the Church side under the “betterments statute.” The Church diocese has asked the court to dismiss this as a frivolous lawsuit; 3-the independent diocese’s appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court, made Feb.9, 2018. In addition, there is an ongoing federal lawsuit (U.S. District Court in Charleston) in which the Church bishop is suing the breakaway bishop claiming trademark infringement under the Lanham Act. In short, the Church is asking the federal court to recognize the Church bishop as the legitimate bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina. This case is on “stay” pending the outcome of the mediation. Trial is expected later this year. Even if the Church diocese prevails in federal court, the breakaway side can appeal to the U.S. Court of Appeals gaining another year or more of delay. Altogether, the litigation between the Church side and the independent diocese could continue for another several years. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Comments are closed. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing BD Howes says: center_img Featured Events Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY February 16, 2018 at 11:51 am I’ve heard this story before. My “SC” defended it’s trademark against South Carolina infringement in 2010. Maybe it’s a South Carolina thing. Fight On! Rector Tampa, FL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC U.S. Supreme Court asked to review South Carolina property decision Rector Smithfield, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Tags Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Collierville, TN Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector Columbus, GA [Episcopal News Service] The leaders of a group that broke away from the Episcopal Church in South Carolina have asked the United States Supreme Court to review a state court ruling that property, assets and most of the diocese’s parishes must remain with the Episcopal Church.The petition for a writ of certiorari asks the court to consider “whether the ‘neutral principles of law’ approach to resolving church property disputes requires courts to recognize a trust on church property even if the alleged trust does not comply with the state’s ordinary trust and property law.”The breakaway group said Feb. 13 that the majority of the South Carolina Supreme Court justices “unquestionably did not take this ‘neutral’ approach.” Because, the group said, at least eight states have adopted what it calls “the less than neutral interpretation,” the U.S. Supreme Court ought to consider the case.The group said it anticipates the court will decide before the end of its current term in June whether to accept the petition for review.Episcopalians in South Carolina have been reorganizing their common life since late 2012, after then-Bishop Mark Lawrence and a majority of clergy and lay leadership said that the diocese had left the Episcopal Church. They disagreed with the wider Episcopal Church about biblical authority and theology, primarily centered on the full inclusion of LGBT people in the life of the church.The Episcopal Church in South Carolina noted on its website that the petition had been filed with the U.S. Supreme Court but offered no comment.A writ of certiorari asks the Supreme Court to review a lower court ruling. Filing a writ does not mean the high court will agree to take the case. The court receives more than 7,000 petitions and accepts between 100 and 150 cases, according to information from the federal court system. The Supreme Court usually agrees to consider cases that could have national significance, might harmonize conflicting decisions in the federal circuit courts and/or could have precedential value.Litigation surrounding the 2012 break has been multileveled and very contentious. The Episcopalians chose to call themselves The Episcopal Church in South Carolina in early 2013 in response to a temporary restraining order that prevented them from using the diocesan seal and the names “The Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of South Carolina,” “The Diocese of South Carolina” and “The Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina.”That issue has not yet been settled and the breakaway group calls itself the Diocese of South Carolina.The breakaway group filed suit in January 2013 against the Episcopal Church. The diocese entered the lawsuit later. After a three-week trial in July 2014, Circuit Court Judge Diane S. Goodstein ruled in February 2015 that the breakaway group had the right to hold onto the diocesan name and property, including individual church buildings.The state Supreme Court agreed in April 2015 to consider the case. The remaining Episcopalians offered in June 2015 to let 35 parishes keep their church properties, whether or not they choose to remain part of the Episcopal Church.In exchange, the proposal required the breakaway group to return the diocesan property, assets and identity of “The Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina” to the diocese that is still affiliated with the Episcopal Church. The breakaway group rejected the offer the day it was made public.The court took more than two years to issue its ruling, which came Aug. 2, 2017, and was against most of the breakaway group’s claims. The justices said 29 of the congregations specifically agreed to abide by the Episcopal Church’s “Dennis Canon” (Canon 1.7.4), which states that a parish holds its property in trust for the diocese and the Episcopal Church. That agreement means they cannot retain church property. However, they said that eight congregations had not agreed to the canon and thus could keep those properties.The diocesan St. Christopher Camp and Conference Center on Seabrook Island must also be returned to the Episcopal Church.On Nov. 17, 2017, the court denied the breakaway group’s request that it reconsider its ruling. The group said Nov. 21 that it would ask the nation’s highest court to review the state high court’s decision.That same day, the group also filed a new lawsuit in the same county court in which it began its original lawsuit. The new filing in Dorchester County cites a “betterments statute” to seek compensation from the Episcopal Church in South Carolina and the Episcopal Church for the cost of improvements made to the properties over the years, according an announcement from The Episcopal Church in South Carolina.The Episcopalians in December asked the state court in Dorchester County to dismiss the new action.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is interim managing editor of the Episcopal News Service. Featured Jobs & Calls Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA last_img read more

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Suspected plot revealed against journalist Lydia Cacho Ribeiro

first_img Receive email alerts May 5, 2021 Find out more Reporter murdered in northwestern Mexico’s Sonora state NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say Follow the news on Mexico February 15, 2006 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Suspected plot revealed against journalist Lydia Cacho Ribeiro Reporters Without Borders is disturbed by the revelation of a plot apparently targeting Lydia Cacho Ribeiro, a freelance journalist and contributor to the daily La Voz del Caribe in Cancún, eastern Mexico.Recordings of compromising telephone conversations between textile magnate, José Camel Nacif, and political figures, were published by the press on 14 February 2006. Some extracts from these discussions show a desire to silence the journalist and influence a “defamation” case against her, the press freedom organisation said.“If they are confirmed, these conversations show the intention to destroy the career and reputation of Lydia Cacho Ribeiro”, it said. “We call on the judicial authorities of Quintana Roo province in eastern Mexico responsible for investigating and trying Lydia Cacho for defamation in a case brought by José Camel Nacif, to be extremely vigilant in the face of political pressure that is being applied to this case.”“We also urge that these recordings be authenticated as quickly as possible and that, if necessary, an investigation is opened into the political figures involved,” it added.The daily La Jornada and W Radio on 14 February published and broadcast the contents of 12 telephone recordings delivered to the two media by an anonymous messenger.The series of recordings are of several phone conversations in which José Camel Nacif, speaks in turn to the governor of Puebla in central Mexico, Mario Marín, and Pablo Salazar Mendiguchía of Chiapas in the south; to other textile bosses, including “Hubert”, a French national; Luis Angel Casas, financial co-ordinator of Mario Marin’s election campaign; Lebanese compatriot, Hanna Nakad Bayeh, known as “Juanito”; and with a journalist on a national daily and radio, with the first name Andrés or “Muñeco”.These recordings, of which Reporters Without Borders has received a copy of the transcripts, show a clear and concerted intention to bring down Lydia Cacho Ribeiro. The journalist is being sued for libel by José Camel Nacif, after she referred to his alleged involvement in a paedophile ring in her 2004 book The Demons of Eden.According to the recordings, José Camel Nacif had apparently struck a deal with the authorities in Puebla state where the libel case was first lodged, for Lydia Cacho to be imprisoned. She was detained there in December 2005 for 24 hours . The discussions are often very insulting, even obscene and one of them turns out to be threatening. José Camel Nacif raises the question of the journalist’s conditions of detention and says he hopes she will be sexually abused in prison.In these same recordings, he also raised the impact her trial could have on that of Jean Succar Kuri, a Lebanese friend, currently imprisoned in the United States for his alleged involvement in the paedophile network the journalist exposed.Valentin Meneses, spokesman for the governor, Mario Marín, refused to confirm if one of the voices on the recording was that of the governor. During an interview given to W Radio, Meneses said that the recordings violated the laws on protection of private life and said Marín had nothing to do with the case.The broadcasting of the recordings provoked an outcry in Mexico. Felipe Calderón, a member of the National Action Party (PAN) of head of state Vicente Fox and a candidate for the presidential elections of 2 July 2006, has called for an investigation to be opened. News RSF_en 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies Help by sharing this information MexicoAmericas News to go further May 13, 2021 Find out more MexicoAmericas Organisation Reports News April 28, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders is disturbed by revelations of a possible plot against journalist Lydia Cacho Ribeiro (photo), who in 2004 exposed the existence of a paedophile ring. Two media have made public compromising telephone conversations between public figures determined to bring about her downfall, including two state governors. last_img read more

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