Journalist Rodrigo Fierro narrowly avoids prison

first_img News EcuadorAmericas Two months before Assange’s extradition hearing, RSF calls for his release on humanitarian grounds and for US Espionage Act charges to be dropped Organisation RSF_en On 29 October, Ecuador’s supreme court upheld a sentence of 30 days in prison for journalist Rodrigo Fierro for defaming former President Leonel Febres Cordero. As Fierro is more than 70 years old and has no previous convictions, the prison sentence will not however be executed. The fine was also reportedly reduced to a symbolic sum.————————————————————16.01.2004 – Court upholds a one-month prison sentence against journalist Rodrigo FierroReporters Without Borders is very concerned by the dismissal of the latest appeal of Rodrigo Fierro, of the daily El Comercio, sentenced on appeal in December 2003 to 30 days in prison.The Quito Superior Court confirmed the prison sentence against Fierro on 9 January. Former president León Febres-Cordero, a deputy in the right-wing Social-Christian Party (PSC), laid a complaint against Fierro over a 29 May 2003 article in which Fierro accused Febres-Cordero of putting the government “at the service of the plutocratic oligarchy that runs the country.”The upholding of this sentence shows a serious worsening of the state of press freedom in Ecuador, where no journalist had been sent to prison for a long time,” said Robert Ménard, secretary general of Reporters Without Borders. “The Rodrigo Fierro case therefore sets a dangerous precedent,” he added, in a letter to the president of the Supreme Court, which is the final appeal court with authority to rule on the case.Ménard called on this court to respect the Declaration of Principles on Freedom of Expression in the Americas adopted by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights and to quash the sentence. Article 11 says, “Laws that penalise offensive expressions directed at public officials restrict freedom of expression and the right to information”.The international press freedom organisation also pointed out that the UN Special rapporteur on the promotion and protection of freedom of opinion and expression had adopted a text in January 2000 that said imprisonment for peaceful expression of an opinion constituted a serious violation of human rights.The Quito Superior Court on 9 January 2004 confirmed the one-month sentence pronounced on appeal on 12 December 2003 against Rodrigo Fierro, columnist on the daily El Comercio. Ferrio was originally sentenced to six months in prison for defamation on 19 September 2003. The day after the 12 December ruling, he put in a fresh appeal based on Article 82 of the criminal code. under which those sentenced to jail terms of less than six months do not have to serve them, if like Ferrio, they have no previous convictions. In its reasons for the 12 January decision, the Superior Court explained that the journalist should have advanced this argument before being sentenced. The journalist’s lawyers put in a further appeal on 12 January. Follow the news on Ecuador November 3, 2004 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Journalist Rodrigo Fierro narrowly avoids prison June 15, 2020 Find out more Coronavirus “information heroes” – journalism that saves lives Receive email alertscenter_img to go further Help by sharing this information News EcuadorAmericas News April 10, 2020 Find out more December 24, 2019 Find out more News Coronavirus: State measures must not allow surveillance of journalists and their sourceslast_img read more

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International delegation representing water inspectorates from UK and Spain to visit Donegal

first_img WhatsApp Previous articleFour nominees revealed for Donegal job.Next articleWeather warning in place for Co Donegal this evening News Highland Nine Til Noon Show – Listen back to Wednesday’s Programme Pinterest GAA decision not sitting well with Donegal – Mick McGrath Google+ Pinterest Twitter Facebook An International delegation representing water inspectorates from the UK and Spain are in Donegal next week to see what they can learn from a number of private group water schemes in the county.The start their visit on Thursday in Inishowen to view the Bunn Water Scheme which supplies a private water supply to 88 homes in the Glengad area.It is seen as one of the premier private schemes in the country.Brian McDonald of the National Federation of Group Water Schemes says the International Delegation are very keen to see what they can learn from the schemes in Donegal:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/brisat.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Homepage BannerNews Google+center_img Facebook WhatsApp By News Highland – October 18, 2014 LUH system challenged by however, work to reduce risk to patients ongoing – Dr Hamilton RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published Almost 10,000 appointments cancelled in Saolta Hospital Group this week International delegation representing water inspectorates from UK and Spain to visit Donegallast_img read more

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Letters

first_imgThis week’s lettersCoaching as a way of lifeMargaret Kubicek’s article – Is coaching being abused? (Training, May 2002)– rings a number of alarm bells for companies considering introducing acoaching culture into their organisation. I am afraid that Myles Downey’s comments on the reality of the situation arealso all too common. I understand the frustrations and experiences bothcontributors refer to. The formation of a professional association of coaches is good news, butorganisations themselves can very easily take steps that will ensure theirinitial investment in the training of coaching skills will reap rewards. Downey asserts that a “mere three days of training” is not enoughto develop coaching skills. But experience has shown me that even two days’ ona well-structured workshop can work wonders. In my previous organisation, Ireceived countless calls from managers who had attended two-day workshops, andwho, when testing these skills in their own environment, were amazed by theresults. The biggest problem came with the lack of ongoing support for managers. Whathappens when the manager slips back into old ways? Or when new managers areappointed and the old coaching skills programme is no longer available?Organisations need to sustain the culture or it will become just another fad.To sustain the benefits, we need to treat it not just as a management style,but as a way of life. It is not only the responsibility of the professionals toensure coaching is successful; it is the ongoing responsibility of the organisationto ensure it stays that way. Moir Ferguson by e-mail Don’t patronise call centre staffYour May edition’s report on improvements in call centres made interestingreading. However, according to a separate recent report*, poor career prospectsare to blame for staff turnover in call centres. This patronising conclusiontrades one set of fallacies for another. ‘Excessive stress and poor pay’ may not be solely responsible for drivingstaff out of call centres, though there is no doubt that these factors stillplay a part in what is now one of the UK’s biggest employment sectors. But itdoesn’t follow that the answer is to take a more career-minded approach to theproblem, as the report suggests. Call centres don’t offer career paths because they can’t. Most call centrestaff don’t think of their jobs as careers in communications any more than busdrivers think of themselves as future transport ministers. Call centres have flat management hierarchies with a small number of bossesand a large number of workers. Most of these are part-timers, mothers returningto work and students. The trick is to combine the needs of the business and the needs of theindividual. Get it right and staff retention will improve. Shubhrajit Naha Commercial development manager, Datapulse LettersOn 1 Jul 2002 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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