Figure skating club glides into second place in synchronized skating

first_imgAmidst the hullabaloo of the Winter Olympics, among the voices of novice figure-skating viewers critiquing Biellmann spins and bracket turns from their couches as if they have any clue what they are watching, sits Tolu Igun.And she is right at home, with a pretty good clue of exactly what she is watching.That’s because while the rest of us think about figure skating once every four years, or perhaps once more if a new Tonya Harding documentary premieres, Igun practices with her synchronized skating team at 6 a.m. Monday and Thursday mornings.The junior transferred to UW this year and immediately joined the synchronized team.The figure skating most of us see on television during the Olympics is known as freestyle. Synchronized skating is a team event, where skaters compete against other teams to woo judges with the “shapes of their elements” — displays such as an interlocking circle between all of the skaters, and how well they move in harmony.Igun is a psychology and philosophy major and sees the sport and its inherent connectivity as something truly special.Men’s Basketball: Badgers look to derail Boilermakers on ‘Frank Kaminsky Night’Wisconsin (11-16, 4-10 Big Ten) will host Purdue (23-4, 12-2 Big Ten) on Thursday night in Madison.  The game will Read…“When you are out there skating with so many in unison, the power just increases,” Igun said.The team is full of excellent skaters, but not all of them are natives to the realm of synchronized skating. In fact, there are freestylers by trade like Igun, who only took up the sport recently, and even an athlete whose background is in theater-on-ice. Then, of course, there are the skaters who have been doing it their whole life.“As long as you have the skills, you can compete,” Igun explained.Nobody embodies this more than the team’s coach, Briana Norys. Norys is a life-long skater, and thanks to a nationally-recognized synchronized skating club near where she grew up outside of Chicago, she had the opportunity to win five national championships and compete for Team U.S.A.From walk-on to staple of Badger offense, can Troy Fumagalli make it at next level?Wisconsin tight end Troy Fumagalli went from coming on as a walk-on to being the most reliable receiver on a Read…Norys competed with the team as a student, and in her senior year became the coach. She is now in her third year.In basketball, casual fans know coach Greg Gard will be yelling at his players to box-out, take smarter shots and play tougher defense during the game. But in synchronized skating, coaching is all in the preparation.“Since this sport has the word ‘synchronized’ in it, my main focus as a coach is unison and detail. The smallest details matter like the position of their arms, the direction of their heads or the expression on their faces, to name a few,” Norys said.Practice is the time to make, and perfect, all of the adjustments. And then the team is given just one chance to show the judges exactly what they can bring.But anyone on the team will tell you, the season did not start off on the right skate.Women’s Tennis: Great start momentarily interrupted by weekend tournament featuring best-of-bestThe Wisconsin Women’s Tennis Team has lost plenty more than they have won in recent years. In Head Coach Kelcy Read…“We weren’t necessarily ready at the beginning of the season, we had nine new members,” Igun said of the rocky start.Norys explained how the team overcame their obstacles of inexperience and unfamiliarity.So well in fact, that by the season’s end, the team had placed second in regionals to cap off the year.“Experience on a team is always important, and with nine new team members it could definitely be a challenge, but all of the new girls on the team are talented and hard-working skaters,” Norys said. “The girls who came to this team with experience skating at a high level helped the returning skaters mentor and set a great example for the ones who were new to synchronized skating.”Admittedly, she was still somewhat surprised with their placement considering the strength of the other teams they were up against this season, and the early struggles they had.But Norys knew this quietly talented team had a great performance in them when she saw their attitude before regionals.Men’s Basketball: Badgers leave weekend with mixed results, comeback falls short against MichiganThe University of Wisconsin men’s basketball team (11-16, 4-10 Big Ten) broke a five-game losing streak Thursday, beating Illinois (12-14, Read…“Their skate didn’t surprise me given the confidence these girls had displayed leading up to this competition and their demeanor before they got on the ice to compete,” Norys said.Nowadays, with the synchronized season in the rear-view mirror, the team looks to South Korea for inspiration. Though synchronized skating is not a sport in this year’s Olympics, the club co-president Clara Temlitz hopes that will change in four years at the Beijing Games.Temlitz and the rest of the team can’t get enough of the action in this year’s Olympics.“We love watching skating,” Temlitz said. “It’s a great way to relieve stress while staying motivated to keep getting better.”The entire club, which combines freestyle skaters and the synchronized team, boasts around 60 members. Igun always finds it odd how something which is such a large part of her life can be completely unknown to so many people.“The club is pretty big, and nobody knows about it,” Igun said.But if — and when — the team continues to trend upwards and places well in competitions across the Midwest in the next few seasons, people may just have to start taking notice.last_img read more

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Red Luncheon to Benefit County Historical Association

first_imgRUMSON – The annual Red – A Girlfriends’ Luncheon to benefit Monmouth County Historical Association will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 7, at the Rumson Country Club.A sold-out event last year, more than 200 women are expected to attend and enjoy lunch, boutique shopping, chance raffles and a display of porcelain teapots from the museum’s collection.“Now more than ever history matters. What better way to celebrate the friendships you value while supporting an important cause Monmouth County Historical Associa­tion,” said event chair Lynn Spector.A “chocolate chance” raffle will offer three chances to win and will add to the fun. Boutique vendors will offer a range of items from jewelry to pajamas to furs. Vendors include: Emily Faith Collection from California, Faye Kim Designs, Reilly & Me, Rugs by Anita, Sequin, Simply Fabulous Accessories, Sugs Jewelry, The Vanderbilt Gallery, The Veranda, Winters Furs, and more.Red also features a silent auction with donations from each vendor plus additional packages from local and New York City businesses.Tickets are available by calling the office at 732-462-1466 or online at www.monmouth history.org.last_img read more

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Atlantic Highlands and County Mull Traffic Fixes

first_imgBy John Burton |ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS — A resident-drafted plan intended to offer some traffic and parking relief for the borough’s First Avenue doesn’t have county officials’ support.“I’d say the plan would not gain county approval at this point,” said borough administrator Adam Hubeny.First Avenue, which is the borough’s main business thoroughfare, is a county roadway and comes under the county purview.Hubeny, Mayor Rhonda “Randi” Le Grice and Police Chief Jerry Vasto joined county engineers and representatives from the county Public Works Department earlier this month to discuss traffic, pedestrian and vehicular safety issues for the borough, particularly those facing the borough’s commercial district. During conversations with county representatives, the “loop proposal,” as it’s become known locally, came up. However, Le Grice acknowledged, county engineers rejected the proposal because the engineers felt it wasn’t in compliance with the county standards. “And the county found many flaws in the plan,” Hubeny acknowledged.Borough resident Mark Fisher undertook looking into the issue that has been increasingly of concern to borough officials: namely tackling traffic and insufficient parking along First Avenue.Fisher drew up a series of plans and accompanying PowerPoint presentations that involved making a portion of First Avenue one way moving east toward the municipal harbor and Seastreak commuter ferry dock. To compensate for that, Fisher’s plan would create a loop, having traffic on a portion of Hennessey Boulevard, a parallel street just north of First Avenue, flow one way in the opposite, westerly direction.In addition to the new traffic pattern, Fisher’s plan called for angling parking spaces on the one-way portions of First and Hennessey to 60 degrees. That, Fisher had said, would allow for additional spaces in the increasingly busy commercial district.The problem for county engineers, though, is that to allow angled parking would require a separate back-out lane, according to county guidelines. “And the street is just not wide enough for that,” Hubeny said.“I just get the feeling there aren’t too many one-way roads that have been approved by them,” Le Grice said, referring to county engineers, who seemed disinclined to allow one-way traffic. When Fisher’s proposal was introduced in May, Le Grice told The Two River Times she was intrigued, especially as it was a relatively easy and inexpensive way to increase parking and address congestion.“It is a big disappointment,” Fisher acknowledged, noting he had asked but wasn’t allowed to participate in the meeting earlier this month.Fisher isn’t a traffic engineer but said he had dedicated approximately 200 hours researching and drafting his plan, saying he wanted to offer some, however marginal, remedy. Like many residents, Fisher had become concerned about traffic safety and the parking spill over into residential neighborhoods adjacent to the commercial district, Le Grice explained.Le Grice said she and others will continue to consider installing angled parking on Hennessey Boulevard, since the borough does “have control over that.”Borough officials and county representatives discussed other traffic calming initiatives as speed humps, flashing pedestrian crossing lights (such as the one recently installed in the vicinity of Portland Pointe housing complex), additional crosswalks, and signage.“However,” Le Grice noted, “we have to come up with the money” for those measures.Monmouth County Engineer Joseph Ettore did not respond to repeated requests for an interview for this story.Le Grice said traffic enforcement will be ramped up to deal with speeding along the roadway. According to Fisher, when he had conducted a series of public presentations on his plan, questionnaires filled out by residents overwhelmingly said speeding and pedestrian safety were leading issues.As for parking, some spaces will be added at the eastern end of First Avenue by restriping in the area of the Hesse building, Le Grice said. But with substantial mixed-use residential and commercial developments moving forward in the district, more businesses coming into the community, and the demands for commuter parking for the ferry, Le Grice said parking is something that will have to be handled if progress is to continue.And that could mean talking about building a garage, the mayor added.“We got to have that conversation,” she said. “We got to look ahead.”This article was first published in the Aug. 24-31, 2017 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

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Ready, set, Golf

first_imgThe driving range at Granite Pointe is also open.”All 18 holes are open and ready to play,” said Granite Pointe spokesperson Barry Auliffe.Auliffe said the course looks in great shape with power carts available for golfers.On the North Shore, Balfour Golf and Country Club opens for full operations Friday, April 1.Club professional Craig Wilkinson said the course looks in fine shape and ready for golfers to take aim at the greens.Other courses already opened for the season include Birchbank in Trail, Christina Lake and Creston. Castlegar is also ready this weekend start the season. Granite Pointe at Nelson has joined many other courses in the region to announce opening for the 2016 golf season.Thursday, the Rosemont-based course kicked off the season with opening of all 18-holes.last_img read more

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LETTERKENNY 24/7: AIDAN CALLAGHAN PARTICIPATES IN IRON MAN COMPETITION IN FRANCE

first_imgOn a busy weekend of racing Danny Mooney making his competitive debut in triathlons made a statement of intent finishing 7th in the LIam Ball Triathlon held in Derry. He then made the journey to Letterkenny and finished second in the North west 10k. Triona Mc Menamin finished second female in Derry and there were good performances from Colm Corcoran, Evelyn Boyle and Seamus Morrison who made his sprint triathlon debut.The North west 10K saw a big turnout from the club with some PB’s and good form being shown by all. Gavin Crawford was next best member behind Danny Mooney finishing 9th followed closely by Adam Speer and Paul Doherty. A number of members had biked in the morning as a warm up. Jason Black made a good return to running after his Italian endeavors.Aidan Callaghan made the long trek to France to take part in a half iron man. It was a competitive field and racing with professional triathletes he finished 10th in his age group and 78th overall in one of the main European events this year . It was disappointing for Aidan in that the swim was cancelled because of water temperature and he has ran better but he biked well.John Conaghan who was in Lanzarote took part in an Olympic triathlon and in very windy conditions finished in a time of 2 hours thirty taking second in his age group in a field of five hundred with twenty professionals taking part. The National Duathlon series is coming to an end with the provisional rankings showing the three qualifying members ranked well. Pride of place goes to Gavin Crawford ranked 3rd nationally in his age group and 17th overall. Jonathan Edwards is ranked 13th in his age group and 44th overall. Cathal Roarty is ranked 67th overall and 4th in his age group.On the cycling front Eugene mcGettigan raced well in the 60 mile road race in Clogher Valley.  Quite a few members also took in the Tour of Sligo Sportive with pride of place going to Graham Parker who completed the 160k route.The club wishes the Majorca bound half iron man participants well as they prepare to race next week. The club Chairman. Nick Fowell, has taken the precaution of bringing the club treasurer, Colin Dean, with him to prevent a coup d’etat, along with Patrick Mc Nulty. Johnny Duffy and Liam Tinney.The club is selling safety swim buoys at a subsidized price as we prepare to return to open water swimming.Club training continues as followsTuesday Track 19.50 AuraWednesday Swim Aura 20.00 Thursday Brick session 18.30 FoxhallSaturday Cycle 8.00 AuraSunday Beginners cycle 8.00 AuraMembership details are available on Triathlon Ireland.com and further information on letterkenny247.com Results  Liam Ball sprint TriathlonDanny Mooney 7th 1.04.25Triona McMenamin 34th 1.11.51Clara Quigley 55th 1.16.19Colm Corcoran 85th 1.20.19Evwklyn Boyle 99th 1.23.14Seamus Morrisson 121st 1.26.31North West 10 KDanny Mooney 2nd 33.27Gavin Crawford 9th 34.44Adam Speer 24th 36.16Paul doherty 33rd 37.28Paul Dillon 54th 38.53Michael Black 68th 39.35Jason King 70th 39.37John Daly 84th 39.55Paul Cullen 97th 40.44David Harvey 43.07Jason Black 155th 43.10Pat Brady 187th 44.22Niall mulrine 193rd 44.27Conor Faul 197th 44.33Liam Tinney 199th 44.37Killian Nulty 229th 45.22Natasha Kelly 235th 45.45Keith Fletcher 250th 46.06Sharon Black 256th 46.06Jack Brennan 265th 46.22Ita McGettigan 269th 46.33John Cannon 312th 47.35Fin Begley 314th 47.36Philip Robinson 346th 48.04Martin Robinson 377th 48.49Patrick McNulty 394th 49.12Aidan Mc Fadden 395th 49.12Louise McKeague 406th 49.40Padraic Mitchell 494th 52.03Raj Mehan 520th 52.32Sean Mc Auliffe 591th 54.30Cathy harvey 600th 54.32Stephanie Dunleavey 658th 56.24labhaoise maguire 659th 56.24Fiona Temple 789th 60.23LETTERKENNY 24/7: AIDAN CALLAGHAN PARTICIPATES IN IRON MAN COMPETITION IN FRANCE was last modified: May 3rd, 2016 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:athleticsletterkenny 24/7Sportlast_img read more

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Discovery of Transfer RNA Recounted

first_imgIn the Sept. 16 issue of Nature,1 Mahlon Hoagland recounts how he did the key experiment in 1957 that proved DNA used “soluble RNA” intermediates, later named transfer RNA (tRNA), on the way to protein synthesis in the ribosome, only to find that Francis Crick had predicted the existence of such intermediates.By this time [1953], scientists generally believed that RNA copies of single strands of DNA, acting as templates prescribing the sequences of amino acids in proteins, existed on ribosomes.  Frances Crick turned his attention to how amino acids might be ordered on such presumed templates.  As there is no chemical similarity or complementarity between amino acids and nucleotides, and thus no means by which they could directly interact, Crick suggested that amino acids might be first attached to short single strands of RNA nucleotides, thereby making the amino acids ‘recognizable’ to complementary sequences of nucleotides on the templates.  In its simplest form, 20 specific enzymes would catalyse the attachment of 20 different kinds of amino acids to 20 different RNA ‘adaptor’ molecules.  These would then be ordered by complementary nucleotide pairing on single-stranded RNA templates on ribosomes.  Francis circulated this ‘adaptor hypothesis’ among 20 fellow molecular biologists of the RNA Tie Club in 1955, but it was not formally published until 1958.   (Emphasis added in all quotes.)Prior to this, biochemists had considered the soluble RNA just “junk” in the mix of ribosomal RNA molecules.  As the picture of transfer RNA emerged (including the discovery of the 20 additional enzymes, named aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, that arm the tRNAs with their cognate amino acids), it looked like a wondrous design.  Hoagland describes his delight at the time, miffed somewhat at having been scooped by Crick:An image arose before me: we explorers, slashing and sweating our way through a dense jungle, rewarded at last by a vision of a beautiful temple – looking up to see Francis, on gossamer wings of theory, gleefully pointing it out to us!    And so it was that tRNAs and their companion activating enzymes (which came to be known as aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases), framed by the adaptor hypothesis, brought the classical biochemists and the molecular biologists together, snug in the same discipline, all speaking the same language.1Mahlon Hoagland, “Turning Points: Enter transfer RNA,” Nature 431, 249 (16 September 2004); doi:10.1038/431249a.This story forms a good example of how the intelligent design approach is good for science.  Notice, first of all, how the wrong approach was to consider the soluble RNA as “junk.”  An ID scientist would think instead that these molecules are there for a purpose and have some role to play.  It took a pursuit based on belief in design to find the truth.  For Hoagland, the pursuit was empirical: observing what actually happened.  For Crick, it was theoretical: investigating how things should happen inside the black box, given the DNA template in the nucleus and the protein chain in the ribosome.  The adaptor hypothesis was a “brilliant imaginative leap,” Hoagland calls it, because it reasoned that an underlying design was required to produce an ordered result.    The personal beliefs of the scientists about evolution or creation did not enter into the picture as long as they used the logic of intelligent design in their approach: effects must have a cause, and design is empirically detectable apart from one’s religious beliefs.  The key to Crick’s insight was the realization that nucleotides and amino acids, having no chemical affinities, must become recognizable to one another during the process of translation.  Notice how that word recognizable implies design, in the same sense a programmer designs a printer driver to enable the computer to recognize it.  Without the driver interface, the computer and the printer would have no natural affinity.  Transfer RNA and its synthetases form a complex suite of adaptors or translators that, like interpreters, understand two languages, the language of nucleotides and the language of proteins (see 06/09/2003 and 04/29/2003 headlines).  Although it is unknown Crick reasoned this way at the time, the logical inference based on uniform experience is that anything that can translate one code into another must have had an intelligent cause.  Perhaps this is one of the reasons Crick later became a proponent of the panspermia hypothesis.  Since life appears too complex to have formed by chance, it must have been put here by intelligent designers.  One would only wish Crick, who died in July, had reasoned further that they, too, must have been designed, and continued his reasoning back to an uncaused First Cause.    The discovery of transfer RNA gives us two lessons in the value of intelligent design in science.  First (despite his personal evolutionary philosophy), Crick’s “adaptor hypothesis” presupposed an inherent design in the process of DNA translation, and Hoagland’s experiments presupposed a function for what others were calling junk.  Second, the tRNA and the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase families provide prima facie evidence of intelligent design by their ability to translate one coded information storage system into another, resulting in information-rich functional machinery.  A picture is worth a thousand words.  Watch tRNA at work in the film Unlocking the Mystery of Life.  The animation of DNA translation and protein synthesis provides a five-minute, permanent cure for hallucinations caused by tripping out on Charlie’s Angle Dust (see 09/12/2004 commentary).(Visited 60 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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USDA Hogs and Pigs Report Flash

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By DTN StaffOMAHA (DTN) — United States inventory of all hogs and pigs on March 1, 2019, was 74.3 million head. This was up 2% from March 1, 2018, but down slightly from Dec. 1, 2018, USDA reported on Thursday.Breeding inventory, at 6.35 million head, was up 2% from last year, and up slightly from the previous quarter.Market hog inventory, at 67.9 million head, was up 2% from last year, but down slightly from last quarter.The December-February 2019 pig crop, at 33.0 million head, was up 3% from 2018. Sows farrowing during this period totaled 3.08 million head, up 2% from 2018. The sows farrowed during this quarter represented 49% of the breeding herd. The average pigs saved per litter was a record high of 10.70 for the December-February period, compared to 10.58 last year.“Even though March 1 hog inventory was up from a year ago, total hog numbers slipped slightly from December levels,” said DTN Analyst Rick Kment. “Overall, hogs kept for breeding and marketing increased 2%, focusing on steady growth in all segments of production. This increase in itself is not likely to be a significant market mover, but the extreme volatility already in the complex could cause moderate-to-strong price pressure based on the emotional nature of the market. This could potentially lead to further drops in prices at the end of the month.”To view the full Quarterly Hogs and Pigs report, visit https://www.nass.usda.gov/…201920182019 aspercentof 2018(1,000 head)(1,000 head)(percent)All Hogs March 174,29672,748102Kept for Breeding6,3496,210102Kept for Marketing67,94866,538102WEIGHT BREAKDOWNUnder 50 lbs.21,45620,94210250-119 lbs.18,63918,212102120-179 lbs.15,26814,996102180 lbs. and over12,58512,387102FARROWINGS/INTENTIONS*Dec-Feb3,0843,034102Mar-May*3,1193,100101Jun-Aug*3,1913,200100Winter Pig Crop32,99932,101103(number)(number)(percent)Dec-Feb Pigs per Litter10.7010.58101(AG)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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SIT chargesheet points finger at Sukhbir over police firing

first_imgThe Special Investigation Team probing the desecration of scriptures in Punjab in 2015 has filed a chargesheet, claiming that the police firing on protesters was a pre-planned handiwork of the then Deputy Chief Minister Sukhbir Singh Badal, the former police chief and the Dera Sacha Sauda head. The chargesheet filed by the SIT of Punjab Police on May 28 has also accused six others, including a former Akali MLA, of firing on people protesting against cases of desecration at Kotkapura in Faridkot district. In a similar case of firing at Behbal Kalan, two protesters were killed. The SIT chargesheet also claimed that Sukhbir Badal arranged a pardon by the Akal Takht Jathedar to Dera Sacha Sauda chief Gurmeet Ram Rahim Singh Insan in a 2007 blasphemy case.Mr. Badal and his father Parkash Singh Badal had earlier dismissed the SIT probe ordered by the Congress government led by Amarinder Singh. Dismissing the former Deputy CM’s claim that he was abroad when the police firing took place, the SIT stated that it was “nothing but an attempt to take a defence alibi.” “The investigations suggest that he was aware of each and every development which was taking place in Punjab. However, the office of the Chief Secretary has been requested to provide complete details,” the chargesheet read. ‘Unprovoked firing’ The chargesheet claimed that the police firing at Kotkapura was “totally unprovoked” and the action was the outcome of a “conspiracy” between high-profile politicians and senior police officers in connivance with the Dera chief and his followers. The SIT said the role of the Badals, the then DGP Sumedh Singh Saini and Ferozepur range DIG Amar Singh Chahal was being investigated.The chargesheet claimed that the blasphemy case registered against Ram Rahim was cancelled at the behest of Sukhbir Badal on January 25, 2012, five days before the Assembly polls, to get the votes of Dera supporters. According to SIT, actor Akshay Kumar arranged a meeting between Sukhbir Badal and Ram Rahim to ensure a pardon for the Dera chief from the Akal Takht for allegedly posing as a Sikh guru. “The investigation conducted by the SIT reveals that a meeting between Sukhbir Badal and dera chief Ram Rahim was arranged by film actor Akshay Kumar on November 21, 2018,” the chargesheet said.last_img read more

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