£11.5m raised by 2019 Prudential RideLondon events – & other event news

first_img  458 total views,  2 views today  459 total views,  3 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis2 Team GB’s Mark Foster & Duncan Goodhew urge Swimathon 2020 sign-upsTeam GB’s Mark Foster and Duncan Goodhew are urging people to sign up to Swimathon 2020, which takes place from 27-29 March. Foster, the former World, European and Commonwealth champion, who set eight world records during a glittering career is supporting the campaign, alongside Olympic gold medallist Duncan Goodhew. Returning for its 33rd year, Swimathon 2020 is hoping to encourage more than 21,000 swimmers nationwide to sign up and dive in to raise funds for Cancer Research UK and Marie Curie. Last year’s Prudential RideLondon events raised £11.5m for charity, while swimming heroes Mark Foster and Duncan Goodhew urge people to take part in this year’s Swimathon – and other charity event news. Advertisement £11.5m raised by 2019 Prudential RideLondon events – & other event news AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis2 Tagged with: Events fundraising eventscenter_img Melanie May | 6 January 2020 | News Children with Cancer UK named RUNFEST Charity of the Year 2020The Richmond RUNFEST has announced Children with Cancer UK as its Charity of the Year for 2020. Over 150 runners will be taking on the Kew Gardens 10k, the Richmond Half & Richmond Marathon for Children with Cancer UK on 12 & 13 September. Money raised will go directly into funding research to improve survival rates of children with cancer and raise awareness to inspire others to help. Every Children with Cancer UK runner will get frequent training and fundraising tips as well as two training days with the RUNFEST team and a VIP party for their family and friends at the post-race music festival. Tikiboo & London Landmarks Half MarathonFor the first time London Landmarks Half Marathon has partnered with an activewear brand, Tikiboo, to produce a bespoke range of branded leggings for runners. 25% of each purchase will be going back to Tommy’s. The collection launched on 4 December and uses LLHM’s signature colours of yellow, pink and black. They include landmarks leggings that showcase London’s grandest landmarks and quirky hidden gems. Icons to spot include Big Ben, St Paul’s Cathedral, the Shard and the Gherkin.  This year’s event takes place on 29 March. £11.5m raised by 2019 Prudential RideLondon eventsParticipants in the 2019 Prudential RideLondon events (main image) raised £11.5 million for charity, under 2018’s £13m record amount, and bringing the total raised for good causes to more than £77 million in the first seven years of the festival of cycling. Alzheimer’s Society raised more than £450,000, making the charity the most successful fundraisers from the event. Macmillan Cancer Support and Prostate Cancer UK were among the many other charities that raised six-figure sums.The 2020 event will take place over the weekend of 15-16 August. It was announced last year that London Marathon Events Ltd has been appointed to deliver RideLondon from 2021 to 2030.The programme currently features seven different events, ranging from FreeCycle, which gives riders of all ages and abilities the opportunity to cycle on traffic-free roads through the centre of London, to mass participation rides over 19, 46 and 100 miles through London and Surrey, the Brompton World Championships Final and UCI WorldTour races for the world’s top professional male and female cyclists. Land Rover Burghley Horse Trials chooses Alzheimer’s Research UK as 2020 Charity of the YearLand Rover Burghley Horse Trials has named Alzheimer’s Research UK as its 2020 charity of the year following a record number of applicants. The Burghley team chose the charity owing to its dedication to making breakthroughs in the diagnosis, treatment and cure for Alzheimer’s. About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

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BYU Baseball Hosting Utes Tuesday before ESPNU telecast with Gonzaga

first_imgMarch 19, 2018 /Sports News – Local BYU Baseball Hosting Utes Tuesday before ESPNU telecast with Gonzaga FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailBoth BYU and Utah’s baseball teams look to salve wounds from last week as they play on Tuesday in the first of four meetings this season.The Cougars bring a 9-9 record into the Deseret First Duel against the Utes who are 2-16.  Tuesday’s game is at 6 p.m. MDT and will be televised live on BYUtv as well as broadcast live over ESPN 960 AM and on BYU Radio-Sirius XM 143.“We need to be even keel and stay the course,” BYU coach Mike Littlewood said.  “The process has proven pretty fruitful over the last five years, so we need to persevere through this.”Lefthander Bo Burrup (1-0, 14.14) will start for the Cougars against Utah. BYU has won the Duel the past six years and nine of the last 10 times it has been contested in this format. BYU leads the series with the Utes, 244-116-2, with Utah defeating the Cougars in the last meeting, 7-6, in 13 innings in Provo.That non-league game precedes BYU hosting another fellow defending West Coast Conference tri-champion on Thursday when the Cougars meet Gonzaga in a nationally televised game on ESPNU at 6 p.m. That game with the Bulldogs begins a three-game series and ends an 11-game home stand.Jordan Wood (1-1, 3.98) will start on the mound for BYU in Thursday’s game, followed by Hayden Rogers (2-2, 5.16) on Friday and Blake Inouye (1-2, 7.71) on Saturday.Gonzaga brings a 2-1 league record into Thursday’s game, which is a rematch of an ESPNU telecast last season in which the Bulldogs won 6-2 in Spokane. The announcers for the ESPNU telecast are Roxy Bernstein and Wes Clements who also called last season’s game. Friday’s game at 6 p.m., and Saturday’s game at 1 p.m., will both be televised live by BYUtv.BYU is 0-3 in the WCC after being swept last week in Provo by league co-leader Loyola Marymount. Written bycenter_img Robert Lovelllast_img read more

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Panelists investigate relationship between poverty and sustainability

The Keough School of Global Affairs held an opening keynote panel for the Schools’s first conference, “For the Planet and the Poor,” on Monday.The keynote included remarks from University President Fr. John Jenkins, followed by a panel of four speakers.“No issues are more challenging, perhaps, or pressing than those we will discuss in coming days — care for the Earth’s environment, alleviating extreme poverty and achieving sustainable development,” Jenkins said. “In a world where differences in faith often lead to conflict and destruction, this dialogue draws us together as one human family in conversation about our common home. Let us make this conference a shinning example about how this dialogue about our world can draw us together in solidarity and common commitment.”While the conference focuses on the complex issues, it is important to remember that all these problems are solvable, Jenkins said.“An adequate response to the challenges before us will demand the very best science and technological innovation available,” Jenkins said. “It must call on experts to develop sophisticated and effective policies at the national and global level. It must influence governments and institutions around the world, yet it also must address the deeper moral, spiritual and theological questions about who we are individually and collectively — and who we want to be together.”Scott Appleby, Marilyn Keough Dean of the Keough School of Global Affairs, said the inaugural conference was created to underscore the convergence of three current events.“The first [event] is the promulgation of ‘Laudato Si’: On Care for our Common Home,’ Pope Frances’s bracing, widely discussed and debated encyclical, calling for nothing less than ethological and ecological convergence of all peoples and nations in response to a global crisis precipitated, the pope argues, by the intertwined dilemmas of rapid environmental degradation and unjust global economic practices, both of which take their largest toll on the poor,” he said.The United Nation’s adaption of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) is the second event the conference emphasizes, Appleby said.“[This goal] has an ambitious and comprehensive agenda to end poverty in all its forms, everywhere, eliminate hunger, ensure healthy lives, promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, build peaceful and inclusive societies, provide access for justice to all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels,” Appleby said. “And here, I mention only seven of the sixteen SDGs. And for the sake of brevity, I include the Paris Climate Agreements within this category of remarkable steps forward.”The third event is the founding of the Keough School, Appleby said.“The first new school or college established at Notre Dame in nearly a century, the Keough School aspires to become a recognized world leader in globally oriented research, teaching and the education of professionals dedicated to advancing sustainable development, the alleviation of poverty, good governance and the peaceful transformation of violent conflict,” Appleby said. “Notre Dame has never been shy in endeavoring to do great things with the dedicated people and plentiful resources that God has blessed this place with.”Rev. Marcelo Sánchez Sorondo, chancellor of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences and the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences in the Vatican, also spoke at the conference. He highlighted the importance of science to the modern world.“It is impossible to understand the modern world if we don’t understand science,” Sorondo said.This merge of Catholic tradition with modern science is new and is breeding a special culture of philosophical and moral reflection within the Catholic faith, Sorondo said. One tangible example Catholics can look to when understanding this new doctrine is the pope’s acceptance of evolution, he said.The pope agrees with the scientific community regarding climate change and is folding the scientific community’s unique respect and development of natural things into church teachings, according to Sorondo. The pope’s motivation lies in the beatitudes and the Gospel, he said.In his address, Jeffery Sachs, director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University, said he wanted to focus on the economic implications of these programs.“The economy needs to be surrounded by science and scientific realities, by ethics and faith, and then by learning,” Sachs said.“Because if you let the economy roam free … it can make a terrible mess. The economic part of this may be the smallest part of the story. That is because the result of 250 years of technological progress and economic development means that the economic parts of our story are probably the most solvable problems.”A. Atiq Rahman, executive director of the Bangladesh Centre for Advanced Studies, said it is economically feasible to implement programs that would alleviate the suffering of those living in abject poverty.“We cannot have a home where one-third of our family is in poverty,” Rahman said. “No house would function if one-third of its members were in abject poverty.”Sara Sievers, associate dean for policy and practice for the Keough School, said it is urgent to implement the programs described above.“So if we have the opportunity because of this historic moment, and we have an urgency because, like it or not, this world is going to change, and it’s either going to change in a direction where we try to do something about it and succeed or where we let things run amuck and deal with problems in some sort of dystopian consequence,” she said. “But it is possible to get all these things done.”Working together, Sachs said, is the only possible way to create solutions to these problems.“We have an accurate view of what needs to be done. It gives us a spirt and a direction. So, we have our work cut out for us,” Sachs said. “The Keough School will make a profound difference — you are coming at exactly the right moment. The idea of a school of global affairs that takes on the challenges not only analytically but morally and spirituality, to turn to the learning and results is exactly what we need.”Tags: For the Planet and the Poor, Keough school, poverty, sustainability read more

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