Oldest business management institute to take measures for 100 final placement

first_imgKolkata: Indian Institute of Social Welfare & Business Management (IISWBM) is taking a slew of measures to achieve 100 percent placement in the institution. Rajagopal Dhar Chakraborti has joined as the new director of the oldest B school in the country in the last week of March.”We want to achieve 100 percent placement. We will be in constant touch with our alumni and seeking their valuable advice for developing our relationship with the industry. We are planning to include the internship of our students as a part of our course,” Dhar Chakrabari said. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsIt may be mentioned that the institute has thousands of alumni based across the world including India. “There are around 2,500 alumni who are in contact with us. A separate cell will be set up to rope in more alumni with the activities of this institute,” a senior official said. He added that the institute will focus on skill development of students and will also recruit at least two more placement officers.According to the placement cell of the B school, there have been 95 percent placements in MBA, 85 percent in Master of Human Resource Management (MHRM ) and 75 percent in other subjects. “We have to achieve 100 percent placement and for this we are also restructuring our curriculum as per job demands in the market,” a senior official of IISWBM said. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedAs per statistics, in 2015-16 the placement rate was 96 percent, and 98 percent in 2016-17. The placement season starts from November and continues till May. “There have been 92 percent placements already,” an official with the B school’s placement cell said.IISWBM has set a precedence in its placement record this year with one of its students bagging a job with Amazon India with a hefty pay package of Rs 12 lakh.The B school was set up by the Calcutta University senate together with the then Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru and the then Bengal Chief Minister Bidhan Chandra Roy and Dijendra Kumar Sanyal in 1953.Companies that had participated in the campus recruitment process includes ICICI, Jio, ITC, Marico, Linde India, Khadims, SBI Cards and of course Amazon India to name a few.last_img read more

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SelfHealing Phones Try Roads That Fix Themselves

first_imgSeptember 16, 2014 Poor road conditions are the bane of drivers. In the U.S., 14 percent of the major roads and highways are in poor condition, according to national transportation research group TRIP. And driving on those cracked, pothole-riddled roads costs drivers a pretty penny: $94 billion a year in extra vehicle repairs and operating costs (about $444 per motorist).Repairing roadways is neither fast or inexpensive. So wouldn’t it be great if, instead of regular asphalt, roads could be made from some compound that can automatically fix and fill in those pesky cracks and holes? Think of LG’s G Flex smartphone with the “self-healing” backside, just on a much larger scale.One Dutch civil engineer thinks he has the answer. Erik Schlangen, from Delft University in the Netherlands, has developed a stronger type of asphalt that, he says, can “heal” itself when heat is applied.Related: Want to Run Faster? This Old-School Concept Might Hold the Answer.Schlangen mixed basic asphalt with strands of steel wool. He discovered that the mixture essentially heals itself of imperfections when subjected to microwave heat (when hot, the steel melts and mixes up the sticky bitumen in the asphalt, leaving a smoother surface as it cools). Watch Schlangen’s TED talk during which he demonstrates the new asphalt concoction:Related: Engineers Are Developing Tech That Could Make Airplanes More HumanBut as expensive as traditional road repair can be, heating up roadways with giant microwaves doesn’t sound very practical either. Schlangen, however, has developed a special vehicle that can heat up the road surface by passing induction coils over it. He says roads made of his steel wool-infused asphalt would require heating approximately every four years to fix and prevent potholes. Dutch officials have apparently backed Schlangen’s project and estimate that roads like these could save the country as much as $116.5 million annually.Anything that keeps my wheels on level ground and saves me money at the same time sounds like a worthwhile innovation to me. Related: A Panic Button and No Steering Wheel: A Look at Google’s First Self-Driving Car This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. 2 min readcenter_img Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now Enroll Now for Freelast_img read more

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How Analytics and Data Can Undermine Leaders

first_imgJuly 23, 2015 Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. 4 min read For business leaders, data can be a best friend and a worst enemy.Our current data revolution is producing more insightful information than ever before. The revolution’s downfall, however, is that it’s also producing a plethora of business leaders unprepared to effectively separate the essential from the interesting.Related: How Data Science Is Fueling Social Entrepreneurship If this sounds like you, know that the misuse of data may hinder your ability to make timely decisions that define your future. So, strive to avoid the mistakes that will turn data into your nemesis — rather than the trusted ally it potentially can be.Today’s most successful business leaders understand how to pinpoint meaningful data, then utilize it to influence future decisions. They know what can be set aside. On the other hand, leaders who can’t discriminate or interpret fall behind — and even fail — when they look to data to give them the perfect answer. They miss the bus by reacting or waiting too long.Case in point: A leader shared with me how the European division of his company had a big strategy decision to make, yet remained at a standstill. Each time strategy was discussed, the conclusion was to do “more analysis” to answer additional questions. Key leaders couldn’t collaborate and reach a decision, and the data being used did not provide a clear answer. Meanwhile, a competitor changed the conversation, affecting the bottom line. While searching for the “right answer,” the company missed its opportunity.So, don’t suffer the same fate. Determine when data is needed, what matters most and when it will give insights — not the “right answer.” Here are four data-related mistakes that may be affecting your business success:1. Overly trusting (or distrusting) dataIt’s important to be aware of both the usefulness and the limitations of data. Some leaders believe that data will provide concrete answers to any and all business problems, while others rely too much on gut feelings without realizing the power of meaningful data as a business tool. Wise leaders know how to strike the right balance.Understanding how to use data and when not to will help you make better decisions, anticipate the future and pinpoint problems that need your attention. More data won’t always give you more information to make a better decision, but the act of analyzing data on a companywide level will shed more light on the true issues.Related: You Need Big Data Now: 5 Professions That Can Benefit2. Looking to data to reveal the futureDespite what many leaders think, data isn’t a crystal ball that knows exactly what the future holds. Data is a merely a collection of current and past trends that, paired with intuition, helps leaders make future-minded decisions. It’s easy to get caught up in analysis, but research shows that analytical thinking reveals only part of the picture. Pairing informed intuition with data analysis results in better decisions that balance facts with insights.3. Believing that “more data” must be better dataData collection is an activity that can easily get out of hand. Sifting through boatloads of analytics is a time-consuming activity that can slow or completely halt decision-making.Smart leaders know when analytics can unlock the answer rather than just provide input. When planning for a substantive change, recognize that using past or current data may not reveal the right clues. Know when to stop and rely on sound judgment.4. Treating all data equallyWhen you ask companies for the key metrics that matter, the answer is often a workbook. The best leaders know how to focus. They understand the essential data that drives their bottom line, employee engagement or customer commitment.The leaders who use data and analytics most effectively have found simplicity and clarity in how they use it. Not all data should be given equal attention or consideration. Focus your time and attention on those that drive business results.Data and analytics play a critical role in today’s business world. It’s easy to become overly dependent upon these things, collect too much or give it all the same attention.Recognizing and correcting these pitfalls is crucial to capitalizing on data that matters, ensuring the longevity of your business and cementing your role as a leader who relies on both information and intuition.Related: 4 Marketing Analytics Tools That Are Shaping the Industry Enroll Now for Free Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Nowlast_img read more

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