Fairtrade charity to auction sending #OneBigTweet to supporters’ Twitter followers

first_img Howard Lake | 21 September 2015 | News Cafedirect Producers Foundation General Manager, Claire Rhodes added:“Our programmes with farmers look to support them in developing and sharing their innovations and knowledge with fellow farmers across our smallholder network. #OneBigTweet is designed to reflect this by leveraging social media to create a new kind of crowd-funding movement.”How do you control the content of the tweet?Of course, CPF will be careful about what kind of tweet is sent out. They are hoping that it will be bought by a philanthropic individual who would buy the tweet in order to support their work. This could of course benefit their personal or social brand.Google Impact ChallengeCafédirect Producers’ Foundation won the Google Impact Challenge in July 2014 and used the £500,000 to launch their first subsidiary social Enterprise, WeFarm.Could other charities do this?The technique to carry out this campaign is possible for other charities to emulate. CPF worked with with Enso on this project, who have previously been involved in an online campaign with Greenpeace. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The Cafedirect Producers’ Foundation is running a fundraising campaign by auctioning the one-off opportunity to send a tweet to hundreds of thousands of Twitter followers – or more.Their #OneBigTweet campaign enables Twitter users to donate access to their followers for one message, thereby reaching a potentially vast audience. It won’t cost Twitter users anything, but the Foundation will know exactly how many followers it can reach – and then invite bids for the right to contact them with a single message.By signing up, Twitter users permit the Foundation to auto-retweet their #OneBigTweet from their account. As they point it, it takes just three clicks to join in.When authorising your Twitter account, the Foundation will be able to add the number of your Twitter followers to their total reach.Comforting words (on the right) from OneBigTweet confirming how they’ll use your Twitter account.They also invite you to take more action to make the tweet even bigger:My followers were valued at $188.58 by #onebigtweet.There have been several other donate-a-tweet initiatives including JustCoz.org, which lets you donate a tweet a day to a worth cause, but they don’t have a fundraising element. Thunderclap runs a similar tool where an organisation can gather lots of Twitter (and Facebook) followers to allow their account to send one message on a certain date or time. Again, this access is not offered as a fundraising tool.Support for #OneBigTweetThe novel campaign has already attracted support from inventor of the hashtag Chris Messina and charity Restless Development, together with musicians and activists.In the first three days the campaign attracted over 320 people signing up from around the world, ‘donating’ 700,000 followers.Katie Messick Maddox, Business Development & Investments Manager at CPF, explained:“When we looked around at the saturated fundraising market, we felt that there’s not much chance for a small charity struggling to be noticed in this environment. Rather than wanting to resort to the same old tactics, we at CPF want to set ourselves out from the crowd.” Advertisement Tagged with: Digital Twittercenter_img  36 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Fairtrade charity to auction sending #OneBigTweet to supporters’ Twitter followers About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Arrests of Journalists In Ferguson Further Fuel Debate About US Press Freedoms

first_img“The real reason I’m doing this is for the future of journalism,” Risen said, according to McClatchy.Risen isn’t the only journalist caught in the Obama administration’s crosshairs.There’s also the case of the government seizing Associated Press phone records amid a leak probe and the labeling of Fox News reporter James Rosen as a co-conspirator along with U.S. State Department Adviser Stephen Kim, who was indicted for allegedly revealing information about a North Korean nuclear test.Obama also oversees an administration that has charged more people—eight—under the Espionage Act of 1917 than all administrations combined.And then there is Barrett Brown, a Texas-based journalist, who has been jailed for 23 months, and who up until early March faced more than 100 years in prison for allegedly trafficking stolen authentication features, access device fraud and identity theft—all related to his sharing a link of publicly available information, albeit hacked information. Brown later pleaded guilty to several charges and now faces 8 ½ years in prison.But his prosecution—and the Obama administration’s so-called “war on whistleblowers”—caused the international press freedom group Reporters Without Borders to drop the United States’ ranking in its yearly “press freedom index” last year, from 32 to 46. #453803802 / gettyimages.com Was arrested— Wesley Lowery (@WesleyLowery) August 14, 2014 Committee to Protect Journalists, a press freedom organization, has condemned what it called the harassment of journalists in Ferguson.“Ferguson is an international story and journalists are going to cover it. They have a right to do so without fearing for their safety or liberty,” CPJ Deputy Director Robert Mahoney said in a statement. “The harassment and detention of reporters must stop. From senior commanders on down, the word must go out to security forces to let journalists do their job.”The arrests of Reily and Lowery was widely reported the next morning, and prompted public outrage, as well as this response from President Obama during an unscheduled statement to reporters in which he addressed the unrest in Ferguson:“There is never an excuse for violence against police, or for those who would use this tragedy as a cover for vandalism or looting. There’s also no excuse for police to use excessive force against peaceful protests, or to throw protestors in jail for lawfully exercising their First Amendment rights. And here, in the United States of America, police should not be bullying or arresting journalists who are just trying to do their jobs and report to the American people on what they see on the ground. Put simply, we all need to hold ourselves to a high standard, particularly those of us in positions of authority.”Here was the president standing up for press freedoms. But, not everyone was heartened by those comments, especially supporters of Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporter James Risen, whose freedom currently hangs in the balance. Police come into McD where me and @ryanjreilly working. Try to kick everyone out.— Wesley Lowery (@WesleyLowery) August 13, 2014 Video of my arrest: http://t.co/baiYPQGfc7/s/ZHkX— Wesley Lowery (@WesleyLowery) August 14, 2014 Last week, press freedom groups handed the DOJ a petition signed by 100,000 Risen supporters, urging Obama and U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder to “halt all legal action” against the journalist. “Before Obama took office, only three whistleblowers have been charged,” Delphine Halgand, U.S. director of Reporters Without Borders, told the Press in March. “That really reminds us that leaks are really crucial, are the lifeblood of investigative journalists, given that nearly all information related to national security is considered secret and classified, so that’s why we really see this war on whistleblowers [as] a clear strategy. This crackdown against whistleblowers is clearly designed to restrict all but officially approved versions of the events.”For national security reporters like Risen—who along with the Times’ Eric Lichtblau in 2005 broke the story about illegal wiretapping of U.S. citizens without warrants—anonymous sources are key to shedding light on government activities.“It’s obviously had an effect, but I’m trying to keep working,” Risen said of the government putting legal pressure on him to reveal his source.Before petitioning the Supreme Court, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth District also declined to hear his appeal.Judge Roger L. Gregory, who wrote the dissenting opinion for the court, criticized his colleagues and said: “Democracy without information about the activities of the government is hardly a democracy.”He continued:“The public, of course, does not have a right to see all classified information held by our government. But public debate on American military and intelligence methods is a critical element of public oversight of our government. Protecting the reporter’s privilege ensures the informed public discussion of important moral, legal, and strategic issues. Public debate helps our government act in accordance with our Constitution and our values. Given the unprecedented volume of information available in the digital age—including information considered classified—it is important for journalists to have the ability to elicit and convey to the public an informed narrative filled with detail and context. Such reporting is critical to the way our citizens obtain information about what is being done in their name by the government.”That’s all Risen and the reporters in Ferguson are trying to do.James Risen US Court of Appeals Decision Officers decided we weren’t leaving McDonalds quickly enough, shouldn’t have been taping them.— Wesley Lowery (@WesleyLowery) August 14, 2014 #453605958 / gettyimages.com Released without any charges, no paperwork whatsoever— Wesley Lowery (@WesleyLowery) August 14, 2014 Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The chaos that has erupted in the streets of Ferguson, Mo. following the fatal shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown by a local police officer on Aug. 9 has ignited long-simmering racial tensions in the St. Louis suburb and has also brought to the mainstream another question that has been boiling in recent years: How free is the press in America?At least a dozen journalists have either been arrested or detained without charge for reporting on the deteriorating conditions in Ferguson. The first two reporters handcuffed by police there were the Washington Post’s Wesley Lowery and the Huffington Post’s Ryan J. Reily, who both tweeted about the experience. Lowery wrote a firsthand account a day after his arrest. Both were inside a McDonald’s when they raised the suspicion of police. They were released after a Los Angeles Times reporter called the Ferguson police chief and notified him of their arrest. Risen faces jail time for refusing to identify his source in his 2006 book State of War: The Secret History of the CIA and the Bush Administration, which revealed “a failed attempt by the CIA to have a former Russian scientist provide flawed nuclear weapons blueprints to Iran,” according to court documents from Risen’s federal appeals court hearing.The Department of Justice can call Risen to testify and ask him to reveal his source, even though the government has already indicted former CIA agent Jeffrey Sterling for disclosing classified information about Iran’s nuclear weapons operation to Risen. If that happens and the reporter refuses to reveal his source, he could potentially be jailed on charges of contempt of court. But, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder has said, “As long as I’m attorney general, no reporter will go to jail for doing his job.”The classified information in question was originally going to be reported in the Times, but the government asked the paper not to publish it. Risen then decided to publish the material in his book.From court documents:“Although The New York Times had agreed not to publish information about Classified Program No. 1, Risen published a book, State of War: The Secret History of the CIA and the Bush Administration (“State of War”), in January 2006, which did disclose the classified information. J.A. 721. Specifically, Chapter 9 of the book, entitled “A Rogue Operation,” reveals details about Classified Program No. 1. J.S.A. 219-32. In the book, Risen entitled the program “Operation Merlin” and described it as a “failed attempt by the CIA to have a former Russian scientist provide flawed nuclear weapon blueprints to Iran.” J.A. 722. Risen does not reveal his sources for the classified information in Chapter 9, nor has he indicated whether he had more than one source. However, much of the chapter is told from the point of view of a CIA case officer responsible for handling Human Asset No. 1. The chapter also describes two classified meetings at which Sterling was the only common attendee.”Risen exhausted all his legal avenues after the Supreme Court declined to hear his appeal. Despite his precarious situation, Risen has vowed to never reveal his source.In a recent interview with his colleague Maureen Dowd, Risen called Obama “the greatest enemy to press freedom in a generation.” He had the same choice remarks for Obama during a panel discussion as part of the George Polk Awards conference back in March.last_img read more

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Tipp denied win over Kilkenny in Nowlan Park thriller

first_imgPremier Manager Michael Ryan says despite the loss, the team are walking away with a stronger squad after incorporating lots of new blood in yesterdays panel. He spoke to Tipp FM’s Stephen Gleeson about his decision to keep players like Paudie Maher on the sidelines: Photo © Tipp FM Tipperary’s hopes of a win against Kilkenny in the National Hurling League were denied in a thrilling finale in Nowlan Park on Sunday.Brian Cody’s side won a cracking Division 1A contest by 2-22 to 2-21, with the loss meaning that Tipp must beat Cork next Sunday to reach the quarter-finals.Kilkenny’s Richie Leahy sealed the winning point for the Cats in the last minute of extra time.last_img

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