Train carrying water from Jolarpettai arrives in parched Chennai

first_imgChennai: A train carrying 2.5 million litres of water arrived in Chennai, which has been grappling with an acute water crisis over the past few months, officials said Friday.The train with 50 tank wagons (BTPN), carrying 50,000 litres of water in each of them from Jolarpettai in Tamil Nadu’s Vellore district, reached the filling station at the Integral Coach Factory Yard in Villivakkam Friday afternoon. Around 100 inlet pipes installed near the railway tracks would be used to discharge 2.5 million litres of water in all the wagons to be sent to a treatment plant after passing through a conduit, an official of Chennai Metropolitan Water Supply and Sewerage Board said. Also Read – How a psychopath killer hid behind the mask of a devout laity!”After treatment it would be sent for distribution. This arrangement has been made for the next six months until the (advent of the) north-east monsoon,” the official said. The train was supposed to reach Chennai on Thursday, but leakages in the valves led to the delay. Jolarpettai is 217 km away from the southern metropolis. All the arrangements took around 20 days of time to complete. The initiative would be formally inaugurated by Tamil Nadu Ministers later in the day, the official said. Also Read – Encounter under way in Pulwama, militant killedChennai has been grappling with an acute water crisis over the past few months. The southern metropolis is facing a daily water deficit of at least 200 million litres, and the four reservoirs supplying to the city have run dry. The Tamil Nadu government had earlier requested the railways to help them ferry the water to the city. Earlier, Chief Minister K Palaniswami had announced mitigating Chennai’s water woes by getting drinking water supplied from Jolarpettai with an allocation of Rs 65 crore.last_img read more

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EYEWITNESS Goodbye Columbus…

…hello the (genocidal) consequencesIt seems like only yesterday your Eyewitness was in primary school and he learnt that poem by the Englishman JC Squire about the landing of Columbus on October 12, 1492 – from the perspective of the “Indian” or the Indigenous peoples who he stumbled over. Because this present generation has been exposed to a different perspective on Columbus, he’d like to share the poem in its entirety;There was an Indian, who had known no change,Who strayed content along a sunlit beachGathering shells. He heard a sudden strangeCommingled noise: looked up; and gasped for speech.For in the bay, where nothing was before,Moved on the sea, by magic, huge canoesWith bellying cloths on poles, and not one oar,And fluttering coloured signs and clambering crews.And he, in fear, this naked man alone,His fallen hands forgetting all their shells,His lips gone pale, knelt low behind a stone,And stared, and saw, and did not understand,Columbus’s doom-burdened caravelsSlant to the shore, and all their seaman land.So here it was, these people had been living on their own terms for thousands and thousands of years but it was all to change after the arrival of what even a member of the English ruling class would call the “doom-burdened caravels”. And doom it was. Columbus had landed on one of the smaller islands in what we now know as The Bahamas. Columbus ironically named it after Christ, “the Saviour) – San Salvador. But the native peoples were anything but “saved” – literally or figuratively.The “gentle people”, as Columbus described them, along with practically all their other tribes in the Caribbean archipelago from Cuba to Trinidad would be wiped out through the confluence of germs, guns, and steel wielded by the Europeans who followed Columbus. As a contemporary Bartholemew De las Casas wrote, the Indigenous population on Hispaniola, for instance, was reduced from 400,000 to 200 in a few decades. Recently we learnt from news of the hurricane on Dominica, only a few hundred survive there. Elsewhere, they’ve all practically disappeared.But the destruction and genocidal consequences of those “doomed caravels” didn’t stop there. Today, members of the African Guyanese community are commemorating the genocide inflicted on their ancestors who were hauled across the Atlantic against their will and made to slave on the plantations of the “New World”.According to Henry Louis Gates, of Harvard University, “Between 1525 and 1866, 12.5 million Africans were shipped to the New World. 10.7 million survived the dreaded Middle Passage, disembarking in North America, the Caribbean and South America.”That means at least 1.8 million perished. That’s genocide.…hello KafkaMaybe we know the story of Gregor the travelling salesman who wakes up one morning and discovers he’s been transformed into a cockroach? The Metamorphosis. From this new state, of course, Gregor can’t do even the simplest task, much less get on with his life. Which wasn’t much to write home about anyway.But like anything else, the family adjusted – but not without a fatal dénouement to Gregor. Something “Kafkaesque” like this is playing out with the poor folks of Wales. One morning last December, they woke up and discovered 1700 of their breadwinners were made incapable of earning bread. The country tried to deal with this tragedy – but seems to have now “adjusted”. The Government – following their first horrible act to change the people of Wales from employed to unemployed – is ensuring their death.The Finance Minister just announced, no job programmes for Wales in their budget but “No new taxes!”What’s this to the metaphorised folks at Wales, who’ve got no money to be taxed??…hello loose lipsThe Gaming Authority received an application for a casino gambling licence. The confidential info is now in the hands of the AG. But the Gaming Authority head says wasn’t him with the loose lips.So is he going to just bluster or investigate? Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedEyewitness: Changing… …self-definitionsAugust 5, 2018In “EYEWITNESS”EYEWITNESS: A new Columbus…November 22, 2017In “EYEWITNESS”Daily Eyewitness Column – PoetryApril 8, 2018In “EYEWITNESS” read more

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