Awilco LNG Adds One More to Its Fleet

first_imgzoom The second of the first two liquefied natural gas (LNG) carriers to be ordered by Norwegian LNG transportation provider Awilco LNG has been delivered on time and on budget after concluding a successful sea trial. The Wilpride, like its identical sister the Wilforce, was built by Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (DSME) at its shipyard near Busan, South Korea.Both are tri-fuel diesel electric ships incorporating induction-based electric propulsion motor technology from GE’s Power Conversion business.The Wilpride was handed over in late November, two months after the Wilforce completed a similarly incident-free sea trial.For both vessels, GE supplied a complete system comprising of two 12.5 MVA and two 6.2 MVA generators, main and cargo switchboards, four transformers, two converters, two 11.5-megawatt motors and remote control.GE provided its expert project management, system and equipment engineering, commissioning and assistance for sea and gas trials.Awilco LNG now has five LNG carriers in its fleet; its first three are all steam powered.In recent months, GE and DSME have partnered on no fewer than 14 LNG carrier projects, four of which have recently been completed (two for Awilco and two for Maran Gas). The majority of the remaining 10 carriers will be delivered during 2014.Press Release, July 3, 2014last_img read more

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Health gap between rich and poor in the spotlight at UN forum

19 October 2011With the health gap between rich and poor at its widest level in recent history, the United Nations today opened a three-day forum in Brazil to tackle the social, economic and environmental root causes of health inequities. With the health gap between rich and poor at its widest level in recent history, the United Nations today opened a three-day forum in Brazil to tackle the social, economic and environmental root causes of health inequities.“The differences, within and between countries, in income levels, in opportunities, in health status, and in access to care are greater today than at any time in recent history,” UN World Health Organization (WHO) Director-General Margaret Chan told representatives of some 120 governments, including 60 health ministers, experts, and civil society organizations in Rio de Janeiro. “A world that is greatly out of balance in matters of health is neither stable nor secure.”The conference, convened by WHO and hosted by the Brazilian Government, comes amid mounting pressure on governments to reduce social inequalities, which have further widened as a result of the global financial crisis. At present, the life expectancy gap between countries is 36 years and there is ample evidence that in all countries – whether low, middle or high-income – an individual’s health is largely determined by his socio-economic position. With the right mix of government policies and coordinated action on local, national and international levels, existing gaps could be narrowed. “Many countries are taking action to reduce socially-determined health gaps but not enough is being done.” WHO said in a news release.“In the context of the global financial crisis, increasing food insecurity, and the challenges of climate change, new strategic approaches will be needed to address the determinants of ill-health.”On Friday, at the end of the conference, governments are expected to endorse a Rio Political Declaration on Social Determinants of Health outlining their agreements and pledges to improve the broader social conditions that affect people’s health. read more

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