CFIA destroying herd linked to TB cow in Alberta brings in more

by The Canadian Press Posted Nov 3, 2016 12:10 pm MDT Last Updated Nov 3, 2016 at 4:20 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email CFIA destroying herd linked to TB cow in Alberta, brings in more inspectors MEDICINE HAT, Alta. – Canada’s food safety watchdog is warning that more ranches may be quarantined as part of the investigation into a case of bovine tuberculosis found in cow that came from southeastern Alberta.The Canadian Food Inspection Agency said only one case of the contagious bacterial disease has been discovered, but 30 ranches in the region remain under quarantine and rules that restrict the movement of cattle.Dr. Harpreet Kochhar, Canada’s chief veterinary officer, said that number could change as the agency brings in more investigators to trace the movement of potentially exposed animals over the past five years, and do more on-farm tests.The investigation involves a significant number of herds and is expected to take months, he said.“As the disease investigation proceeds, additional premises may need to be quarantined while cattle are tested for bovine TB,” Kochhar said Thursday in a statement.“Testing, humane destruction and disposal are carried out as required.”The agency said it has already started to destroy a herd in the area linked to the cow that came from a ranch near Jenner, about 250 kilometres east of Calgary.Kochhar said the CFIA recognizes the quarantines and investigation are having a significant impact on producers, especially on those who were planning to sell cattle this fall.“The CFIA will pay compensation to producers as quickly as possible for any animals ordered destroyed,” he said.Alberta Beef Producers, an association that represents 20,000 producers, has said the CFIA needs to be more transparent with ranchers about the bovine tuberculosis case.Bovine TB can be transmitted from affected animals to people, causing a condition similar to human tuberculosis, but the CFIA website says the risk to the general population is very low.The United States Department of Agriculture reported the case of bovine TB to Canada in September after the disease was found in a slaughtered cow from Alberta.Bovine TB is a reportable disease in Canada and has been subject to a mandatory national eradication program since 1923.The CFIA said Canada is considered to be officially free of the disease, although isolated cases may occur. The agency said this finding does not affect Canada’s current status.— By John Cotter in Edmonton read more

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New UN report finds drop in global foreign direct investment in 2014

According to the 2015 edition of the World Investment Report, FDI fell by 16 per cent to $1.23 trillion in 2014, while flows to developed countries declined by 28 per cent to $499 billion.The report, produced by the UN Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), says this is mostly because of “the fragility of the global economy, policy uncertainty for investors and elevated geopolitical risks,” adding that new investments were offset by some large divestments, the most important being in the United States.In the meantime, inward FDI flows to developing economies reached their highest level ever, at $681 billion with a 2 per cent rise. Among the top 10 FDI recipients in the world, five are developing economies, with China taking the lead.For 2015, UNCTAD projects global FDI inflows to grow by 11 per cent to $1.4 trillion. Expectations are for further rises to $1.5 trillion in 2016 and to $1.7 trillion in 2017.The Geneva-based UN agency is also calling for a systematic reform of the international investment agreement regime in order to bring coherence to the almost 3,300 agreements currently in existence.“The case for reform is clear,” UNCTAD Secretary-General Mukhisa Kituyi said. “We are now faced with a global patchwork of agreements, with unintended and sometimes far-reaching consequences for the right, of developed and developing countries alike, to regulate.”“‘Old style’ international investment agreements have increasingly come to a dead end. Reform should make the global network of international investment agreements better fit the needs and realities of today and tomorrow,” explained Mr. Kituyi, stressing the importance of achieving such harmonization as the international community is in the process of formulating a new development agenda.“Reform should be guided by the goal of more effectively harnessing international investment agreements for sustainable and inclusive development, focusing on key reform areas, and following a multi-level, systematic and inclusive approach,” Mr. Kituyi stated. “Only a common approach will deliver an international investment agreement regime in which stability, clarity and predictability help achieve the objectives of all stakeholders.”Among the areas where governments should undertake efforts, UNCTAD mentions the need to safeguard the right to regulate in the public interest, to reform investment dispute settlement and to expand investment promotion and facilitation in international investment agreements. read more

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