Northwestern Passage to Open by Early September

first_img此页面无法正确加载 Google 地图。您是否拥有此网站?确定 zoom Large areas of sea ice still remain in the Northwestern Passage along the Canadian coast. However, based on analysis of satellite images by the Global Ice Center (GIC), ice experts at Japan-based Weathernews predict this should melt away by early September, thus opening the passage for vessels.The Northern Sea Route bordering Russia is now open to commercial shipping traffic as of August 21st, 2014. This is two weeks earlier than last season when lower than average temperatures resulted inslow pace of melting in the Arctic Ocean. Last summer, the northeastern passage opened at the beginning of September.Sovcomflot Group’s (SCF) Anichkov Bridge was the first large capacity tanker to transit the Northern Sea Route this year. The 47,000 – dwt MR vessel completed her voyage along the route on August 18, 2014, the Russian shipping company said.The Northern Sea Route has been in use by vessels escorted by Russian icebreakers since late June. However, enough ice has melted north of the New Siberian Islands (Novosibirsk) to allow vessels to pass through the region with minimal risk of collision from now until early October, according to Weathernews’ Global Ice Center.Use of the NSR by the shipping industry as cost-saving alternative route continues to grow in recent years. My location Print  Close Press Release, August 28, 2014; Image: NATO/Canadalast_img read more

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Taseko Mines Ltd suing Ottawa for blocking development of 15billion gold and

VANCOUVER — Taseko Mines Ltd. (TSX: TKO) is suing the federal government in B.C. Supreme Court and seeking unspecified compensation for a 2014 decision that blocked development of a proposed $1.5 billion gold and copper deposit.The Vancouver-based company claims that the government and its agents — including the environment minister at the time — failed to meet their legal duties to Taseko when they blocked the New Prosperity project.Taseko also alleges, among other things, that its property was effectively expropriated without compensation when a federal cabinet decision on Feb. 25, 2014, made its mineral rights essentially worthless.The company didn’t say how much money it’s seeking through the lawsuit, filed in the provincial court, but said its seeking general and punitive damages, plus interest, and any other relief that the court may choose.The federal government did not immediately return a message seeking comment.Proxy fights get started: Raging River wants change at Taseko MinesTaseko seeks to sue Ottawa for damages over B.C. mine rejectionThe suit was announced Friday, three days before Taseko and the federal government are scheduled to face off in Vancouver with a related dispute before the Federal Court of Canada.The latest claim dated Thursday relates to an open-pit project, 125 kilometres southwest of Williams Lake, B.C., Taseko had promoted as a major economic driver in the Cariboo region of the B.C. Interior.Its suit says the project would have provided about 550 direct jobs and 1,280 indirect jobs and contribute about $459-million annually to the province’s gross domestic product.The project and its predecessor, the Prosperity project, ran into opposition over environmental issues and both were rejected in 2014 and 2010 by the Harper Conservative government on advice from the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency.“Given the conduct of the Government of Canada and its agents we have no other choice but to defend the interests of our shareholders and to protect their assets,” Taseko CEO Russell Hallbauer said in a statement. read more

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