South Asian church women discuss challenges and seek gender justice

first_img Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Knoxville, TN Asia, Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Posted Oct 19, 2015 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID [Anglican Communion News Service] Women from the Anglican and United Churches of South Asia share achievements in their work with women and girls and explore challenges in seeking gender justice in their region.An International Anglican Women’s Network (IAWN) regional consultation for South Asia has brought together the Network’s Provincial Links (contacts) and a number of other women from the Church of North India, Church of South India, Church of Bangladesh and Church of Ceylon who have leadership roles in mission and ministry among women and girls.“This was an important and inspirational conference with stories shared of achievements and challenges in the Church’s work towards gender justice”, said IAWN Steering Group convener, Ann Skamp. “It celebrated the resilience of women in the region and enabled mutual encouragement and a commitment to support each other.“It is clear that women in the South Asia Churches have many challenges in common but that there are also challenges specific to local contexts such as those associated with the dowry system and the continuing significance of caste identities in India, and the support urgently needed for war widows, families of the disappeared, and survivors of sexual and gender-based violence following years of civil conflict in Sri Lanka.“An analysis of power as the ability to create or resist change gave all of us an insight into how advantage and disadvantage works and how strategies are needed to help us remove barriers to progress in improving the status of women and girls.”Church of South India Moderator Bishop Dr Godava Dyvasirvadam joined participants for their opening worship and encouraged them to be a movement of women, rather than a group of women, serving as guardians of the faith, as change-makers and as bridge builders towards a new order.The South Asia consultation took place 6 to 8 October at the Henry Martyn Institute, an international centre for research, inter faith relations and reconciliation in Hyderabad, India.Participants in the consultation shared positive stories about the enabling of women’s leadership within the Churches of South Asia and in their communities. Initiatives of the Church of South India Women’s Fellowship, for example, have included training programmes for rural pastors’ wives and Bible Women, and providing opportunities for younger women to take an active part in church activities.The Church of North India Women’s Fellowship of Nagpur Diocese and the All India Council of Christian Women used the annual International Women’s Day to visit police stations where they honoured the contributions of women police officers. At the same time, they spoke with male police officers and advocated for women-friendly police stations, where those reporting domestic violence are treated respectfully and not dismissed or humiliated.Such hopeful stories however are set against a background of significant challenges. Patriarchal attitudes upheld by many women as well as men, the favouring and special treatment of boys over girls within families, and cultures of rape, domestic violence and sexual harassment were identified as critical and persistent barriers to the human rights and flourishing of women and girls in the region.The participants therefore took a number of steps together in order to understand better the status quo and to consider strategies for the future. Role play showed how wives have a different experience and fewer opportunities than their husbands in spite of having the same social background. Bible studies from a liberative perspective and discussion on the theology of gender affirmed the strong potential for women in the South Asia context, in spite of their broken situation, to be ambassadors of transformation and builders of just relationships in church and community.Since the South Asian Churches represent a religious minority and are most often involved at grassroots level with little voice into the national arena, the women recognised the importance of networking among themselves and discovering their allies in the Churches and in civil society in order to interact with governmental and human rights institutions at national and international levels. They also looked at using existing and emerging movements and campaigns for gender justice.Some churches in the region already take part in the annual 16 Days of Activism against Gender-based Violence (25 November to 10 December) and the White Ribbon campaign which is an international movement equipping men and boys to take responsibility for ending violence against women and girls. Male pastors have been encouraged to take a lead in preaching a Jesus-type masculinity which empowers women rather than subjugating them.This year’s theme for the 16 Days is ‘From Peace in the Home to Peace in the World: Make Education Safe for All!’. The participants therefore reflected on how their Churches might engage with families and communities to transform attitudes and practices that restrict girls’ access to education in South Asia, and that have a negative impact on the safety of girls when they are at school or on the journey to and from school.The participants learned about the new global Faith Movement for Gender Justice and considered how a future regional workshop for faith leaders in South Asia might work in an inter faith setting.A message to Church leadership in the region and to the Anglican Consultative Council is being drafted drawing on the key issues arising during the consultation and seeking solidarity and support.Photographs from the consultation are here.A report and resources from the consultation are being gathered and will shortly be posted on the IAWN website here. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Tags Advocacy Peace & Justice, Gender Justice South Asian church women discuss challenges and seek gender justice Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Events Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NClast_img read more

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RIP: The Rt. Rev. James Malone Coleman, second bishop of…

first_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Obituary, Rector Hopkinsville, KY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Bath, NC Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Rector Smithfield, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Collierville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York People RIP: The Rt. Rev. James Malone Coleman, second bishop of the Diocese of West Tennessee Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET center_img Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Posted May 6, 2020 Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Submit an Event Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags The Rt. Rev. James Malone Coleman, the second bishop of the Diocese of West Tennessee. Image courtesy of the Diocese of West Tennessee[Diocese of West Tennessee] The Rt. Rev. James Malone Coleman, the second bishop of the Diocese of West Tennessee, died on May 4 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.Born in Memphis, Tennessee, on August 26, 1929, and educated at Christian Brothers High School, Coleman graduated from the University of the South with a master of divinity degree. Ordained a deacon by Bishop Theodore N. Barth in 1956, he was ordained a priest by Bishop John Vander Horst the following year. He served churches in Tennessee, Georgia and Virginia and spent 14 years at St. James Church in Baton Rouge. He was rector of St. John’s Church, Memphis, at the time of his election as bishop coadjutor.On June 19, 1993, Coleman was elected the eighth bishop coadjutor of the Diocese of West Tennessee. His consecration by the presiding bishop, the Most Rev. Edmond Lee Browning, took place on Nov. 13, 1993, at Mississippi Boulevard Christian Church.Bishop Coleman’s leadership included a vision for the planting of new churches and a strategic plan to foster growth in the diocese. Using small group meetings and open forums, his episcopacy brought about healing and reconciliation on diverse issues.He initiated several important programs for young people, including the Diocesan Youth Council and the reinstatement of diocesan college chaplaincy. The establishment of the Center for the Catechesis of the Good Shepherd brought an internationally recognized Christian formation program to the diocese. First located at St. Mary’s Cathedral, the Center continues to foster cooperation among several denominations.At the 20th Annual Convention in March 2001, a resolution was adopted that recognized and honored the ministry and service of both Coleman and his devoted first wife, Carter, who preceded him in death.Coleman married Emily Douglass Steward Coleman (“Douglass”) in 2005. After retiring as bishop of West Tennessee in 2001, Coleman served as bishop-in-residence at St. James Episcopal Church in Baton Rouge.^slast_img read more

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Ed Sheeran offers meeting and signed guitar in CharityStars auction

first_imgEd Sheeran offers meeting and signed guitar in CharityStars auction London Irish CentreProceeds from the auction will support the London Irish Centre, which has worked for over sixty years to provide a ‘home from home’ to young Irish emigrants, providing a mix of  services, projects and events to support the changing needs and interests of the Irish in London.CharityStars expects the auction to be one of its most successful to date.The auction is now live and will run until Thursday 14th June at 4:00pm BST. It is accepting bids in cryptocurrencies AidCoin, Bitcoin and Ethereum. Cryptocurrencies, celebrities and auctionsSheeran is not the first celebrity to be involved in accepting cryptocurrencies as a means of funding their campaigns. A “power lunch” with Bitcoin.com CEO Roger Ver not surprisingly accepted bids in Bitcoin, and Naomi Campbell did so for the auction (hosted by CharityStars) at this year’s Cannes fashion show for her ‘Fashion For Relief’ campaign.AidCoin is the cryptocurrency set up by CharityStars.CEO and Co-Founder of CharityStars, Francesco Nazari Fusetti, comments: “2018 has already seen a surge in popularity of celebrities and organisations choosing to accept crypto donations and advocate AidCoin. Myself and the team have every hope in its potential to become the leading name within this new era of charitable giving.”  797 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis15 Tagged with: auction Celebrity cryptocurrency Singer Ed Sheeran is donating a “once-in-a-lifetime experience” to benefit a London charity with online auctioning platform, CharityStars.Two guests will get to meet with Ed Sheeran on 19th June, the day after his four nights sold-out performances at Wembley Arena. In addition the experience will include taking home a guitar signed by Ed, and two exclusive VVIP tickets – not open to general release – to an evening hosted by Dermot O’Leary, Annie Mac, Sara Cox and Ed himself.  Howard Lake | 11 June 2018 | News  798 total views,  3 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis15 About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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TCV offers free membership as part of 60th anniversary celebrations

first_img  288 total views,  3 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis17 Community volunteering charity TCV is offering free membership in celebration of its 60th anniversary, to both new and existing members.Its Community Network Membership usually costs £38 annually and is available free thanks to the funding from the People’s Postcode Lottery.Membership is open to any community group, club, school or local organisation that shares TCV‘s passion for improving green spaces to benefit the community and local wildlife.Darren York, TCV CEO said:“This important funding will enable us to support even more communities, working together to improve the places where people live and tackle the issues that matter most to them.”Will Humpington, Climate Change and Environmental Programmes Advisor at People’s Postcode Lottery said: Advertisement Main image: 2018 TCV Growing Communities in Adur and Worthing   287 total views,  2 views today Melanie May | 27 February 2019 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis17 About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com. Tagged with: Volunteering TCV offers free membership as part of 60th anniversary celebrations “We are delighted that through the support of our players, TCV is able to celebrate this key milestone by connecting and supporting even more conservation groups across the country.”last_img read more

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Black labor: From chattel slavery to wage slavery/ Part 2

first_imgThe following is excerpted from Chapter 2 of Marcy’s “High Tech, Low Pay: A Marxist analysis of the changing character of the working class,” first published in 1986. Note that a few selected words have been updated to reflect current usage. Marcy is the late chairperson of Workers World Party. “High Tech, Low Pay” is available as a free download at workers.org/marcy.The South was a slavocracy based on an ancient mode of production within the geographical confines of a new world social order, the bourgeois social order, with its own mode of capitalist production. One of the fundamental differences between the bourgeois mode and older modes of production so eloquently brought out in the Communist Manifesto is that “The bourgeoisie cannot exist without constantly revolutionizing the instruments of production and thereby the relations of production, and with them the whole relations of society.” 13Nat Turner plans heroic slave rebellion, which he led in Virginia in 1831.How does this stack up with the Southern slavocracy? Marx continued, “Conservation of the old modes of production in unaltered form was . . . the first condition of existence for all earlier industrial classes.” The South tried to retain the old slavocracy not only in unaltered form but in extreme rigidity. It was therefore on a collision course with the new bourgeois order, with the process of capitalist production and its tremendous growth in the North.Slavery vs. capitalist productionAnother and more flagrant contradiction was that one of the fundamental characteristics of the capitalist mode of production is wage slavery, which means a free proletarian, that is, a worker free to sell his or her labor on the capitalist market. Capitalist production and the extraction of surplus value in the interest of further capitalist accumulation is virtually impossible without a free working class, free to be exploited and oppressed, free to be unemployed. Chattel slavery was thus thoroughly incompatible with wage slavery.Slavery as an economic institution has everywhere proved itself uneconomical. This is especially true when it depends on one great crop such as cotton, with diminishing reliance on sugar, rice and other products. The South was turning into a monocultural economy.Over all, the spectacular leap in technology on which the Southern planters depended so heavily to maintain slavery was only one of many scientific and technological developments in an era which was rapidly turning them out in greater and greater numbers. In this respect the South was falling far behind the North.The North was making all the great strides in science and technology. It built up great universities which became centers for basic research. Whatever prominence the South had had in science in the earlier days, it was losing to the North. Seen in terms of the contemporary struggle in technology of the U.S. against Japan and Western Europe, the South was steadily losing ground to the North in what we would call today the technological race.As a competing form of economic and social system compared to the social system based on capitalist production, slavery was hopelessly out of place and had no chance, save by the use of sheer force. Slavery was static, fixed and extremely rigid in its form of production. It was also characterized by the most outlandish forms of cruelty and brutality.The capitalist system, on the other hand, while certainly not characterized by either compassion or humanity, was nevertheless “revolutionizing” its means of production, that is, it was advancing science and technology. The change from chattel slavery to wage slavery was a profoundly revolutionary change, a tremendous social transformation. But historically it constituted a change in the form of exploitation, not its abolition.Thus we see that while the first phase of the scientific-technological revolution brought fabulous profits to the South and gave it the power to expand, it ultimately undid slavery. Just as technological change undermined the Southern slavocracy, so will it make obsolete the present industrial financial plutocracy with its system of wage slavery … .Black labor todayExtrapolating from the population figures provided in the 1986 annual report of the National Urban League on the “State of Black America,” there are about 28 million Black people in the United States. That’s larger than most African countries and larger than most middle-sized countries represented in the United Nations.By always referring to Black people as a minority, the bourgeois press obscures the class significance of the Black population, which is overwhelmingly working class and which, therefore, especially when taken together with the Latinx, Asian and Native population, adds a very significant dimension to the whole character of the working class here.To regard the Black struggle strictly from the viewpoint of minority-majority is to lose much of its profound social and political implications. What should interest working-class students of the Black struggle, however, is that even these figures, which are probably understated, disclose a social viability which has strong revolutionary potentialities given the conditions we believe are developing that will give a fundamentally altered social composition to the working class.To understand the current state of Black labor in the United States, it is necessary to look first at the mass migration of Black people to the North which took on momentum early in the 20th century and reached considerable proportions at the end of the First World War. Mass production industries in the U.S. like auto (especially Ford) and steel were in a period of high capitalist development. When this culminated in the First World War, it opened the gates of some industries and fields of economic endeavor to Black labor, notwithstanding rank discrimination and entrenched racial barriers.These were not relaxed. Instead artificial classifications were created so that Black workers doing almost exactly the same work as whites got far lower wages. Nor were barriers lifted in the skilled trades and American Federation of Labor craft unions. These were as rigidly racist in their approach as they had been before the First World War. But Black labor continually found ways to gain skills and get skilled jobs despite government, employer and union racial discrimination.It should always be borne in mind that even the first boatloads of enslaved people who arrived in this country from Africa brought with them useful skills which were developed even in slavery times. In cities like New York and Philadelphia, before the mass migrations from Europe started, there were a considerable number of Black workers in industry who had developed skills. But as more and more white labor from Europe became available, Black workers began to be relentlessly driven out of industry.These mass migrations from Europe undermined whatever leverage the Black workers might have had in industry notwithstanding discrimination. Things got more and more difficult for them.Capitalism, as the involuntary promoter of the development of the working class, also caused the mass migration of Black agricultural workers from the South to the North. Notwithstanding the racial barrier or the unemployment as a consequence of the capitalist economic cycle, more and more Black workers got into Northern industry even as the pool of Black unemployed grew.That most of the central cities of the North, and now some in the South, have a majority or a very large minority of Black people is objectively due to the transformation of capitalist industry with the First and Second World Wars. World War II in particular was a much longer war for the U.S. and entailed the construction of many defense facilities. In fact, the entire U.S. industrial apparatus was converted for war purposes and for the first time full employment became an artificial phenomenon dependent on war spending.These two objective factors — the First and Second World Wars — also found an echo beginning in 1950 with the Korean War. In the early 1950s and again during the Vietnam War employment was artificially propped up by the continuing growth of the defense industries.If today in cities like Detroit, Chicago, Newark, Philadelphia, New York, Atlanta, Memphis and Birmingham there are large Black populations with some political power, it is not due to any attempt by the ruling class to ameliorate the condition of Black workers or to lighten the burden of discrimination. Rather it comes as a result of objective development arising out of the organic functioning of the capitalist system and the inevitability of imperialist wars and military interventions abroad. This is not to say that the whole industrial structure of the U.S. is due entirely to imperialist wars, but without them it is difficult to conceive how there could have been such a rapid social transformation in the condition of Black and also white workers.The mass migration from the South — and back to the South, especially during times of unemployment — is among the objective factors affecting the development of Black labor. The subjective factors arise from the freedom struggle, especially the struggle of the 1960s … .The Black Freedom struggleIt is utterly impossible to understand the contemporary role of Black workers in this country and particularly their situation in the trade union movement without considering them in a broader political framework. A study of Black labor, especially over the last 25 years, that omitted the general political struggle, the freedom struggle of the Black people as a whole, would make for a very constricted and even distorted view of both the great achievements of Black workers in the trade union movement and the equally great, if not greater, drawbacks of their situation.Racism has permeated every layer of capitalist society; the trade union movement from its earliest times up to the present has been permeated with chauvinism and vicious discriminatory practices. The trade unions are the most formidable working-class organizations in the country. Aside from temporary retreats and taking into account the long duration of the political reaction, they are bound to become organs of the great struggles for emancipation from both racist oppression and capitalist class exploitation.But all of this has to be considered in the broader arena of the overall political struggle of Black people, in which the trade unions have certainly been a significant part, but only a part. In reality, what happens there is a reflection of what is going on in the Black struggle as a whole. The great battles of the 1960s and 1970s in particular must be considered in evaluating and analyzing how this reflected itself in the unions.Just to take one example out of many: In April 1969, some 500 Black workers shut down production at the Ford plant in Mahwah, N.J., for several days. The workers walked out because a foreman called one of the workers a “Black bastard.” Although the official United Auto Workers leadership urged the workers to return to their jobs, they nevertheless stayed out until the foreman was ousted from the plant. This was the famous so-called wildcat strike at Mahwah organized by the United Black Brothers, and it represented a significant victory for all the workers.If this significant victory for the UAW at that period is seen only in the trade union framework, it could present an oddity. But when seen in the larger framework of the overall Black political struggle, one gets a far truer measure of its significance for the local struggle as well as nationally.There were other significant developments in the UAW that came on the heels of the great 1967 rebellion in Detroit and ushered in a series of electoral victories for the Black workers in the UAW. “Suddenly the UAW leadership stopped the practice of mobilizing opposition to Black candidates in local elections. Within a few months after the formation of the League of Revolutionary Black Workers, Black workers were elected as presidents of Local 900 (Ford’s Wayne plant), Local 47 (Chrysler Detroit Forge), Local 961 (Chrysler’s Eldron Gear), Local 7 (Chrysler), Local 51 (Plymouth), and even Local 1248 (Chrysler Mopar), where only 20 percent of the plant’s 989 workers were Black. A Black was elected for the first time as vice president of Briggs Local 21. …”16Before the Mahwah struggle took place, there were a considerable number of political rebellions and insurrections of Black people. There was the Harlem rebellion, followed by Watts, Newark, and Cleveland, to name only a few, and of course the largest of the mass insurrections took place in Detroit. Following the assassination of Martin Luther King in 1968 there were a total of more than 500 rebellions throughout the whole country.How then can the struggles of Black workers for equality be seen as strictly trade union struggles? Few if any of the very significant gains made by Black workers could have been attained without the so-called outside struggle, that is, the general political struggle put up by Black people. That was the real catalyst, the basic generator for the trade union gains, many of which were not only vital but indispensable, considering the long and difficult task to attain equality which still goes on.What is said about the Black struggle applies equally and to some extent even more to the Latin struggle, the women’s struggle and the [LGBTQ2+] struggle. Any gains made in the unions must be related to the broader struggles which generated them. It would of course be fruitful to speculate on how different it could have been had the struggles been initiated by the trade union movement rather than being forced upon it. But this is the music of the future, not of the past.There are about 110 million workers in the U.S. today. In the mid-1980s, only about 17.3 million belonged to unions, as we’ve discussed earlier. However, there can be no doubt that the union movement will become the fundamental lever for working-class struggle. The anti-labor offensive which has been sweeping the country for several years is bound to produce one of the truly great upsurges of the working class, and this time the union movement will not be in the rearguard but in the vanguard of the struggle as regards Black, Latinx, Asian, and Native people, women and [LGBTQ2+ people].The tardiness of the working-class response to the offensive of the ruling class in the face of such profound political and social reaction can be explained in part by the lack of a mass political party of the working class. The response from the working class, both organized and unorganized, is likely to come as the result of spontaneous outbreaks which will take the form of trade unionism but not necessarily in the way the trade union officialdom presides over the union movement. What more concrete form it will take we have to leave for events themselves to reveal.Suffice it to say that the very intensity of the political reaction, generated by the Reagan administration and prepared earlier by the Carter administration and its predecessors, has created the conditions for a tumultuous social upheaval, not a controlled one that could be easily manipulated by contemporary bourgeois politicians and the trade union bureaucracy. The very tardiness in preparing a party of the working class, which in Europe and other areas has taken generations to build up, makes inevitable that the pent-up rage at the oppression and exploitation endured by all strata of the working class will break out in another form. It would seem to emanate most easily from the workplace and from the vast pool of unemployed. The special oppression of women, Black, Latinx, Asian, Arab, Native and [LGBTQ2+] workers will make them a magnet for one another.A former science adviser to Reagan in late 1985 told a Cable News Network (CNN) interviewer that “unemployment in Western Europe constitutes the greatest danger to Western civilization.” Of course, it’s true! But not only in Europe.The capitalist “recovery” here in the U.S. has been taking place amidst some 15 million unemployed, if comprehensive calculations are made. Social peace cannot be maintained on such an explosive material base.References13. Marx, Karl and Frederick Engels, “Manifesto of the Communist Party,” Vol.16. Foner, Philip, Organized Labor and the Black Worker, 1619-1981. International Publishers (New York, 1982), p. 417.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Free Ant Smith! Drop the charges now! Defend the Philly rebellion!

first_imgAnt Smith leading chants in Philadelphia at the Oct. 3rd “Fists Up! Fight Back! Rally & Teach In” in honor of Breonna Taylor and in solidarity with Louisville and all communities mobilizing in defense of Black lives.Workers World Party strongly condemns the outrageous arrest of Anthony “Ant” Smith, a high school teacher, community leader and organizer with Philly REAL (Racial, Economic and Legal) Justice. On Oct. 28, federal officers arrested Smith on trumped-up charges related to resistance activities that occurred earlier this summer during the rebellion after the police murder of George Floyd. These types of bogus charges parallel the racist police tactics that have led to the incarceration of countless Black liberation leaders. They must be urgently resisted. Smith has been a prominent organizer of the Black Lives Matter movement since 2015, leading countless marches against racist police brutality, to tear down the statue of notoriously racist Mayor Frank Rizzo, and to free political prisoner Mumia Abu-Jamal. Smith’s leadership, whether in serving food every week with Food Not Bombs Solidarity or in the founding of the Philly Black Radical Organizing Collective, has put a target on his back. Now the federal officers and local police want to make Smith a political prisoner.Like many Black people, Smith has been terrorized by the police throughout his entire adolescence and adulthood. He has been stopped-and-frisked, given rough rides, and brutalized by police during protests. The state recognizes his leadership and his abolitionist politics and is now trying to shut him down, along with the entire Black liberation movement. We cannot let this happen.The timing of Smith’s arrest couldn’t be more politically motivated. The people of Philadelphia continue to rise up against endless racist police terror, centuries of racist oppression and decades of abuse. On Oct. 26, the Philadelphia police murdered Walter Wallace Jr. in front of his mother and neighbors, who frantically urged police not to shoot. Since then, thousands of people have protested and rebelled against systematic racism and capitalist exploitation, leading to mass arrests and more police riots. The Pennsylvania National Guard arrived on Oct. 28 to enforce a military occupation of the city. As the capitalist election promises to bring more of a spotlight to Philadelphia and Pennsylvania, we understand that the ruling class and their agents want to send a clear message to the movement: We will shut you down by any means necessary. Our movements must unite in defense of the most oppressed, in defense of brilliant Black fighters like Ant Smith, by any means necessary.Workers World Party will do everything we can to support the righteous demands of the self-defense movement:Free Ant Smith! Drop the charges now!It is right to rebel against racist police terror! Drop all charges against those arrested during this rebellion and free all the prisoners!Reparations to the Black community!Tear down the prison walls! Free them all! Abolish the police!FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Donegal TD to investigate medical card delays

first_img WhatsApp Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Newsx Adverts Pinterest By News Highland – February 27, 2012 Google+ Pinterest Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire Previous articleIrish Cancer Society’s Care to Drive scheme already a successNext articleLetterkenny well placed to benefit from New Frontiers programme – Enterprise Ireland News Highland Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Donegal TD Charlie McConalogue has committed to visiting the central unit for processing medical cards in Dublin this Friday to investigate why such lengthy delays exist for processing medical cards.He says he wants to see first-hand the system used for processing medical cards as part of a delegation from the Joint Oireachtas Committee for Health and Children.It is estimated that up to 3,000 people in Donegal are still waiting for the cards to be renewed or for new applications to be processed.Deputy McConalogue says that applications are supposed to be processed within 15 days and that simply isn’t happening:[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/medi1pm.mp3[/podcast]center_img Twitter WhatsApp Facebook 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Google+ Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Donegal TD to investigate medical card delays 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Twitterlast_img read more

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UPSC Objects Plea Seeking Postponement Of Civil Service Exam, SC Asks UPSC To Affidavit

first_imgTop StoriesUPSC Objects Plea Seeking Postponement Of Civil Service Exam, SC Asks UPSC To Affidavit Radhika Roy27 Sep 2020 11:18 PMShare This – xSupreme Court will now hear the plea seeking for postponement of the upcoming Civil Services Examination, 2020 on Wednesday, that is, 30th September. A Bench comprising of Justices AM Khanwilkar, BR Gavai and Krishna Murari directed Advocate Naresh Kaushik, appearing on behalf of the Union Public Service Commission, to file an Affidavit by tomorrow, and listed the plea for day…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginSupreme Court will now hear the plea seeking for postponement of the upcoming Civil Services Examination, 2020 on Wednesday, that is, 30th September. A Bench comprising of Justices AM Khanwilkar, BR Gavai and Krishna Murari directed Advocate Naresh Kaushik, appearing on behalf of the Union Public Service Commission, to file an Affidavit by tomorrow, and listed the plea for day after. In today’s proceedings, Senior Advocate VK Shukla, appearing for 20 UPSC aspirants, informed the Bench that a copy had been served to the opposing counsel. Kaushik, appearing for UPSC, then submitted to the Bench that it would be impossible to agree with the contentions of the Petitioners as postponement would hurt the process of recruitment. Further, UPSC had already considered the issue and had deferred it once. The Bench then asked Kaushik to file a short Affidavit listing down the logistical reasons for not postponing. Advocate Anushree Kapadia, appearing on behalf of a father of a government officer who is desirous to attempt the exam, was directed to serve a copy of her Intervention Application to Kaushik and all the other parties. The matter will now be taken up on 30th September. On 24th September, a Bench of Justices AM Khanwilkar and Sanjiv Khanna had posted the matter for 28th September, but had not issued notice. The plea has been filed by 20 UPSC aspirants through Advocate Alakh Alok Srivastava against conducting of the Civil Services (Preliminary) Examination 2020, on October 4. They have submitted that this 7 hours long Offline exam, which will be taken by approximately six lakh aspirants at test centres in 72 cities across India, is likely to be a big source of further spread of the Covid-19 virus. It is therefore submitted that the Revised Calendar for UPSC exam is utterly arbitrary and patently violative of the Right to Health and Life of the aspirants, under Article 21 of the Constitution. The Petitioners have submitted that for fear of risk of illness or death, they may not be able to take the captioned examination. Thus, it is contended that the Revised Calendar violates their right to practice their chosen profession/occupation of serving the public, under Article 19 (1) (g) of the Constitution. It is further contended that the Revised Calendar suffers from class-based discrimination and violates Article 14 of the Constitution, inasmuch as students belonging to the middle class and/or lower middle class will not be able to afford transport, accommodation, or other expenses to take the examination amid a pandemic. Furthermore, it violates Article 16 of the Constitution as it deprives many of the aspirants from equal opportunity in public employment. The Petitioners therefore seek postponement of the Civil Services Exam for 2 to 3 months, so that the flood/ incessant rains go away, the COVID-19 curve may flatten and the State Governments, who are otherwise “admittedly unprepared” as of today, get more time to prepare themselves for implementation of SOPs of the said Exam. It is highlighted that Civil Services Exam, being a recruitment examination, is altogether different from an academic examination and thus in the event of its postponement, there would not be any question of delay or loss of any academic session. Other grounds taken by the Petitioners are listed below: · Many Civil Services aspirants, who are already working as Frontline COVID Warriors in different hospitals and/or administrative departments. It would not only be difficult for them to leave their place of work and travel to their Examination Centres, but their absence at their workplace at such critical times may lead to immense suffering to the COVID patients and/or COVID management. · In many of similar large-scale examinations conducted recently, virtually there were no SOPs followed, no social distancing maintained and every tall claim of the Respondents have virtually failed on ground. · Due to lack of at least one examination centre in every district of India and due to the fact that many students have returned back from their place of study to their hometowns, today there are many students whose Examination Centres are 1000 KMs apart from their present place of residence. · COVID-19 has been found to be airborne and in many cases it is asymptomatic. This is increasing the possibility of its spurt at the large gatherings of students/ their parents at the Exam Centre. · Many districts/ municipal bodies are still imposing Complete Lockdown in their respective areas. Many big cities have several containment zones. Free movement of students is restricted in such areas, causing a lot of harassment. · Students would be required to wear the masks for more than 7-8 hours on the date of examinations and thus would be forced to reduced oxygen level, resulting into slowed down brain function and thus it is even in the interest of justice to postpone these Exams in the interest of health of the students. · Even as per the Unlock-4 Guidelines, all libraries, colleges, educational and coaching institutions are also closed and hence many of the aspirants have been deprived from adequate preparation of the said Exam. Next Storylast_img read more

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Department of Social Protection activates Humanitarian Relief Scheme

first_img Pinterest Facebook Twitter Social Protection Minister Regina Doherty says her department is working to provide immediate financial supports to families and individuals affected by the severe weather and flooding in Donegal.The department has activated its Humanitarian Assistance Scheme which is available to assist people whose homes are damaged by flooding and who are not in a position to meet costs for essential needs, household items and in some instances structural repair.Financial support under the Humanitarian Assistance Scheme will be initially targeted at the immediate needs of those who may have been directly impacted by the flooding ( such as clothing, food) with further support available  (financial support for household items and structural repair) as the clean-up operations begin. People and families in need of assistance are being advised to visit the local Intreo Centre where Community Welfare Service Teams are waiting to assist them.  To ensure we can quickly and effectively meet the needs of those who need our help, the Department has redeployed staff to the offices serving the worst affected areas, notably the Inishowen Peninsula.For those unable to travel to our offices they can contact Buncrana Intreo office on (074) 9364600 or Ballybofey Intreo on (074) 9130490.Staff from the Department will be on the ground today in Donegal to assist in the coordinated Government response. The Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government is the lead Department for severe weather emergencies and the Department of Social Protection’s local Community Welfare Service is in contact with the Local Authority. This interagency response ensures that supports are provided to those affected as swiftly as possible.Minister Joe McHugh is continuing visits today to homes, farmers and businesses affected by the floods. He was in Clonmany and Carndonagh earlier today with Minister Kevin Boxer Moran.A short time ago, Minister Regina Doherty spoke to Greg Hughes on the Ten to One Show……Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/regdoherty.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Google+ Homepage BannerNews Twitter Facebook By News Highland – August 24, 2017 Google+ Pinterestcenter_img DL Debate – 24/05/21 WhatsApp News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Department of Social Protection activates Humanitarian Relief Scheme Harps come back to win in Waterford Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Previous articleFoyle Ferry to extend service tonight as work continues on Quigley’s Point to Muff RoadNext articleMichael Murphy looks forward to the challenge of his first managerial job News Highland RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODAlast_img read more

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Anomalous temperatures in central Scotia Sea sediments – Bottom water variation or pore water circulation in old ocean crust

first_imgWe report low temperature gradients (from 60% to 12% of geothermal), and extrapolated temperatures offset from modern bottom water temperatures, in sediments from the central Scotia Sea. We examine possible causes, bearing in mind similar anomalous measurements 18 years previously, attributed at the time to instrumental error. Small temperature offsets (±0.1°C) may reflect short‐term bottom temperature variation within eddies of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Low sediment temperature gradients may be caused by horizontal advection of cold water within the upper oceanic basaltic layer (documented in younger ocean floor elsewhere), or by northward encroachment of colder bottom waters (from the Antarctic Peninsula shelf or Weddell Sea) for several years prior to measurementlast_img

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